Part 2: How should I plan to take my Migraine medicines with me on vacation?
By Ellen Schnakenberg—December 22, 2010

In Part 1, we listed how to plan and pack your medicines if you’re going on board an airplane to get to your destination. In Part 2 we list more details about other precautions and plans you may want to consider when you need to carry medicine while traveling for the holidays:

  • Consider carrying an additional prescription for your medicines from your doctor. This assures that, should your medicine be lost, broken or confiscated, you won’t have to go without your needed treatment. Should this occur, you can ask at the airport information booth, or the hotel information desk or concierge where to go to replace them. If you are abroad, you will find your medication list with generic names helpful, and locating a pharmacy is usually not difficult when you know that they may have signs saying Farmacia or have a mortar and pestle or a green cross on them. Even antiquated looking pharmacies in third world countries will carry more than jars of herbs or over the counter remedies — just ask them.
  • If you are traveling in the US and have your prescriptions normally filled at national chains like Walgreens or CVS, you may be able to pick up your medication or other supplies (like syringes or needles) once you arrive at your destination. These companies keep your prescription on file nation-wide and are one good reason frequent travelers like to use them. If you plan to do this, call them ahead and be sure to bring a few doses “just in case” your medicine is temporarily out of stock or the store is closed when you arrive.
  • If your medicine requires compounding, find out where the nearest compounding pharmacy is before you leave and note it somewhere you won’t lose it. If necessary, your doctor can send your prescription to the compounding pharmacy before your arrival, and your medicine can be waiting for you when you arrive. In case of emergency, a prescription at another pharmacy can be transferred to the pharmacy where you’re visiting, and replacement medications can be obtained.

There are other more detailed tips and tricks that might be helpful to Migraineurs taking their medicines while traveling. Please share your ideas here!

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About Ellen Schnakenberg

Migraine.com’s patient educator/advocate, writer and community leader Ellen, is a lifelong Migraineur. She has been chronic since the mid 1990′s.

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