10 Things I Want to Share About Migraines

 

Much about Migraines is poorly understood, and there are still many misconceptions about Migraines. To help you better understand what Migraines are and their impact on the lives of those who have them, here are the top 10 things I want to share with you about Migraines:

 

1Migraine is a genetic neurological disease. Although the cause and pathophysiology of the disease is not yet fully understood, current research indicates that it’s caused by genetics and overly sensitive neurons in the brain that fire in a wave when someone with Migraine disease encounters a Migraine trigger. At this time, there is no cure for Migraine disease.

2According to the World Health Organization, a severe Migraine attack can be as disabling as quadriplegia.

 

3Migraine afflicts more than 37 million Americans, including 18% of women, 6% of men, and 19 percent of veterans of the Iraq war.

 

4Migraines have other symptoms in addition to the headache. Some of those symptoms can be as debilitating as the headache or even more debilitating, depending on the person. Symptoms of a Migraine attack may include:

  • Mild to severe headache that is often one-sided and pulsatile or throbbing.
  • Nausea and/or vomiting.
  • Increased sensitivity to light, sound, and odors.
  • Difficulty in concentrating and thinking clearly.
  • Aphasia — impaired ability to use or comprehend words.
  • Hemiplegia — one-sided paralysis.
  • Extreme fatigue.
  • Visual symptoms including blurry vision, partial loss of sight, seeing flashing lights, and more.
  • Decrease in or loss of hearing
  • Allodynia — hypersensitivity to feel and touch
  • Dizziness or vertigo.
  • Dehydration or retention of fluids, depending on the individual’s reactions.
  • Many more.

5Migraine attacks are precipitated by the Migraineur’s exposure to Migraine triggers. Migraine triggers are physiological, not emotional. Each Migraineur’s triggers are different from those of other Migraineurs. Potential triggers include:

  • Perfumes and fragrances. Just being around someone wearing fragrance can trigger a devastating Migraine attack for some people.
  • Bright and/or flickering lights, including fluorescent lighting. Some Migraineurs cannot work in fluorescent lighting. Some need to wear sunglasses at times, even indoors.
  • Loud noises and crowded places.
  • Changes in the weather and/or altitude.
  • Cigarette smoke; exhaust fumes; odors or fumes from chemicals, including some cleaning products.
  • Certain foods, especially foods prepared with MSG and other preservatives.

6It’s a myth that people with Migraines can’t handle stressful situations or high-stress jobs. Stress is NOT a Migraine trigger. It’s what’s called an exacerbating factor that makes Migraineurs more susceptible to their triggers just as stress makes anyone more susceptible to the virus that brings on the common cold.

7Migraineurs often feel alone, isolated, desolate, and even guilty. They often feel guilty because they aren’t able to “be there” for their family and friends as much as they want to be and because they may have to miss days of work.

8Not all doctors have the experience, training, and knowledge to treat Migraine properly. Contrary to what most people think, neurologists aren’t necessarily Migraine specialists, and Migraine specialists aren’t necessarily neurologists. Finding a doctor to properly treat Migraine is one of the most important, and sometimes most difficult, steps in treatment. There is a shortage of qualified Migraine specialists, so many Migraineurs must travel significant distances to find adequate care.

9Migraine disease can be disabling for some Migraineurs to the extent that they qualify for Social Security disability benefits or qualify for accommodation under the Americans with Disability Act. There are Migraineurs whose disease is so severe that doctors are unable to help them adequately control the attacks, and the Migraineur is unable to work or participate in “normal” daily activities. When a Migraine attack strikes, many Migraineurs desperately need a dark, quiet place to lie down.

10If they had a choice, the Migraineurs in your life would like nothing better than to be “normal.” They want to feel well and be present in your life and in their own. But it’s not a matter of choice. Migraineurs must accept that they have a disease just as they would if they had diabetes, asthma, or any other disease. They need your help, support, and understanding.

We’ve prepared a PDF version of this document to make it easy for you to email to others or print it to share with others. Download the PDF.

To help you better understand Migraine disease and those who have it, here are links to some helpful information:

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

View Comments (89)
  • Lori23
    6 years ago

    Thank you! Especially the parts about stress and relationships. I just was dx’d with status migrainosus along with cutaneous allodonyia (sorry if my spelling is a little off). Im a psychotherapist and my job is very stressful but I enjoy it. My husband doesnt understand how I can work in that environment. Just today he got mad at me for still having a migraine after 5 days! It feels very lonely because I push myself to work and crash when I get home. I plan to show him this article.

  • debbiewheaton
    6 years ago

    Would like to kmow if anybody else has chiari malformation. I have had migraines all my life and at age 52 just within the last few years starting to understand them and by lots of education being able to prevent some of them. Also thanks to a great Dr and surgery have only 2-3 a month much better then almost every day.

  • zoobooks
    6 years ago

    Thank you for this article. It puts into words, what I cannot.

  • Teri-Robert author
    6 years ago

    You’re very welcome!

  • body
    6 years ago

    Hi Teri,
    I agree. I am having that trouble with my niece. We visited over Thanksgiving and she had a migraine the whole time. Kept telling me was the stress of the holiday season, etc. She is a wellness nutritionist and is careful about what she eats and drinks but does not pace herself and burns out. The fatigue is often what triggers her attacks. What I also discovered, and have experienced with many people that they really don’t know what stress is. The term is tossed around loosely and what stresses one person does not stress another. What a number of people seem to be unaware of is that stress is the physiological response of our bodies to a perceived stressor. The body’s response is the same whether we have migraine disease or not. It is how we manage this response that affects our susceptibility to many illnesses including cancer and heart disease. The difference for migraineurs is that we already have the disease. In our case, how we manage our body’s response can decrease our suceptibility to our migraine attacks. I think as migraineurs we are particularly sensitive to the term “stress” because of the stigma that has been attached to us. You have done a swell job bringing this to the public’s attention. I love physiology and pathophysiology and stress and adrenal crisis was one of my passions in my work with critically ill patients and staff. I never did a swell job on myself though and have learned in these last few years to apply these principles to myself in the management of my migraines.

  • body
    6 years ago

    For years I thought migraines were “really bad headaches” I was cursed with because I couldn’t manage the hectic pace of my lifestyle. Many people who suffer from migraines still name “stress” as their number one trigger. The only thing I would like to add is that stress can lead to tension-type headaches and if persistent (chronic stress) can deplete stress hormones, which in turn can decrease estrogen levels and thus decrease serotonin levels. This process can then contribute to chronic migraine attacks.

  • Teri-Robert author
    6 years ago

    Sharron,
    Stress definitely can plan a role. What I don’t want for people is for them to assume that stress itself is the culprit and not look for things they do or don’t do or other things related to stress that are the actual triggers. That’s what I had done until someone challenged my belief that stress was a major trigger for me. Now that I know that stress itself is not a trigger for me, and I know what the real triggers are, I have no more Migraines during stressful times than any other time.

  • kristisprague
    6 years ago

    Going to share this article with those who love me. There is much they know and much yet to understand. This format is very user friendly! Thank you. Kristi

  • Clear Spaces, LLC
    7 years ago

    Many of my friends, colleagues and clients deal with migraines. The effect of migraines can be profound. This article makes it clear – a migraine is not just another headache. Thanks to the person who sent the article my way.

  • Kathy Jo Horton Bishop
    7 years ago

    love it so sharing with everyone.

  • Molly Johnson Herbert
    7 years ago

    that was very informative…..and I know a woman who will feel better reading this….I will send it on to her….thanks Molly Johnson Herbert.

  • Jennifer Collins-Gonzalez
    7 years ago

    at times I think people like being ignorant about migraines, gives them good excuse not to do any of those 10 things to help us out. even a friend can & will be indifferent to it,,,

  • Shellie Hollibaugh Eaton
    7 years ago

    Very accurate…as a migraine sufferer of 24 years…and the mother who passed this on to her daughter, I would like people to understand mirgaine sufferers more. Its not fun! Though I am thankful…and know that I could be so much worse off.

  • Kathy Buchanan Hughes
    7 years ago

    I’ve had migraine headaches for 35 years now….it’s a whole body experience…not just the throbbing head pain but the non stop throwing up from nausea…you have no idea what it’s like until you have one…

  • kristisprague
    6 years ago

    It is so true about a migraine being a whole body experience. I think that is misunderstood by folks. Even when I take my medication for the migraine, if it works, I still have other symptoms that it does not address.
    I have had daily migraines for just 8 years, I can’t imagine 35 years. I hope you have been able to try medication for the vomiting and nausea. Wishing you peace and a pain free day. Kristi

  • Jodi Heethuis
    7 years ago

    I have had migraines for several years! I went to the headache clinic at the University of Michigan Hospital in 1996 and it did help. My regular practitioner has done the most as medicine advances. I take Topomax twice daily to prevent them and it has been a miracle drug. It is actually for seizures but works great for preventing migraines!

  • kristisprague
    6 years ago

    Were you at MHNI? I spent time there…3 weeks. I also use Topamax, but can just take 30 mgs. My cognitive functioning and memory are really affected negatively by this medication. My best to you!

  • Karen Brandt-Williams
    7 years ago

    I was on Topamax for a long time memory loss bad:(

  • Linda Castellano
    7 years ago

    I would like these facts from this article printed with really nice lettering and then framed and I would hang it in my home (kinda like a piece of art) so people could read it and get this info from something other than my usual moaning and complaining that I cannot hepl:) But they are sick of it so I would like them to have another option to hear about this illness!

  • brianne
    7 years ago

    Love your idea! And, this article is a piece of art!

  • Marinelly Echevarria de Rosado
    7 years ago

    Thank you foe explaning migraines so crystal clear! As a sufferer for many yrs I often wondered if my fam really understand what I go tru. I think this article will help!

  • Cindy Hickman
    7 years ago

    Migraines suck! I have had them since I can remember..my father suffered from them and passed them onto me and several of my sisters and brothers.

  • Cindy Hickman
    7 years ago

    thats right!!

  • Michael Rosa
    7 years ago

    read it but it didnt tell me nuttin i dont already know and live daily. lol. have had migraines bad now for years. some people have thought i was drunk when i had bad ones lol. if they only knew the pain that goes with the numbness they wouldnt laugh…..

  • Natasha Frye
    7 years ago

    To the cold Christina Yang, (and this dr. was MUCH worse) at the Washington DC, VA who just told me to up my dose of inderal needs to read this! I’m glad I kept my civilian dr., because he is on the chronic migraine commercial for the list of dr’s who specializes. I wish that cold blooded witch could have one and know what we go through, because she thinks they are easy just get over. What she doesn’t understand, is the when the weather changes, I CAN’T control that, so then what?

  • Lisa Jurcich Kovach
    7 years ago

    It has been 20 days or more since my attack, and my Migraines are starting to ease up a bit. My Topomax was increased, and the pollen has backed off a bit too. Esp the grass. I couldn’t even go outside without breaking out in hives. Gotta go back to my allergist as well, and to get my botox in May. Let’s hope it works this time.

  • Denise Crosby
    7 years ago

    I have suffered for migraines for years, lost a very good job because of it, called off too much, and I am still getting h/a’s, this past week I had one 4 days out of the week. I hate it, and if I knew why I was getting them I would do anything to prevent them. I hate telling my family I have a headache, and I know they are use to it, but probably sick of hearing it, I am sick of saying it all the time, it messes my life up so much.

  • Carla Fox Quick
    7 years ago

    Great article as usual! Sending a copy to my family!

  • Selena McMurray
    7 years ago

    10 things you should know about Migraines.

  • Selena McMurray
    7 years ago

    Dana Kero Cvitanovic Thanks, miss you too! xo Happy Easter, hope you had a lovely Easter xo

  • Dana Kero Cvitanovic
    7 years ago

    I hope you getting better Selena. Miss you!! Happy Easter xx

  • Wanda Mitchell
    7 years ago

    Melissa, I read your post..The Article I mean! And want you to know this..# 7….Broke my Heart! Don’t ” feel quilty”…Let others ” Be there” for you~ And…#10-I want to help, support and understand! And what is this word -*Normal*?
    < 3 wanda! P.S. Happy Easter!

  • Pamela Curtis
    7 years ago

    Gotta disagree with #6. Stress is a trigger, but it can be both the ramp up of stress, or the ramp *down* from stress. I would always get my migraines once the stress went *away*. I found that out when I didn’t pop a migraine when I found out my father was going in for emergency heart surgery, and then popped a migraine that sent me to my knees mere seconds after hearing that he was okay. I relaxed, and BOOM! Splodie head.

    Also, I’ve written an article on the pathophysiology if you’d like to check it out. I’ve got a ppt presentation too. http://makethislookawesome.blogspot.com/2011/11/what-is-migraine.html

  • Lisa Jurcich Kovach
    7 years ago

    I too suffer from awful Migraines, and was doing really well with my botox injections after 9 months, but this spring they have come back. After having maybe 1 to having a whole lot is really hard to deal with. I have gone back to taking migraine medicines that I haden’t had to use, but they aren’t helping. I’m just so frustrated.

  • Joy Peters
    7 years ago

    I am so sorry that they are back.

  • Mutlu West
    7 years ago

    Thank you! The descriptions precisely fits with me and it’s also a like reading meself on about this. I also appreciate the fighting factors and/or relative aids. Thanks

  • Jan Happer Wolke
    7 years ago

    They sure do run in our family!

  • Cherie Kim
    7 years ago

    pretty accurate…im glad mine don’t cause paralysis!

  • Patti Taylor
    7 years ago

    Very accurate. I suffered with migrains for 10 years.

  • Bonnie Stone Russell
    7 years ago

    Great article, thank you so much! Is it OK to run off some copies for me to hand out to relatives, etc, who want more information?

  • Migraine.com
    7 years ago

    Hi Bonnie – Please feel free to share! There is a downloadable PDF (linked to in the article) that should be easy to print and email.

  • Sharon N Ty Burdette
    7 years ago

    Wonderful article…I have suffered from migraines since I was 19 and now at 42 still suffering…and my daughter has servere ones too. This was great information, thank you!

  • Mintando Wonnyer
    7 years ago
  • Craig Talley
    7 years ago

    I think its worth reminding that a migraine is dangerous to those of us with other chronic disease like hypertension or COPD. The pain can trigger spikes in blood pressure leading to fatalities. I have a kit of medications from my very good doctor to treat the migraine and blood pressure that can be used by injection and other non oral means. The nausea and vomiting from migraine can prevent the use of normal meds so alternate administration must be ready. As soon as the aura and pain starts my frontline remedy is sumatriptan and it thankfully works wonders.
    Great article and very informative!

  • JeffnLisa Wagner
    7 years ago

    Great article Teri. I have had this disease since I was a young girl but we were always able to control them. The past three years, they have become debillitating and have ruined my life! I lost my job, friends. I never attend social events. But the worst is that my family and especially my husband still does not understand. He has gone to appointments with me and asked questions. I have printed off articles before. I am at my end. I know a lot of marriages end when migraines become chronic and debilitating but where do I go, what do I do, how do I live? I am going to print this off and put it on our fridge for my family. I have five grown kids so maybe something will click! Thanks Teri!

  • Teri Robert
    7 years ago

    {{{{{{Lisa}}}}}} Thank you. Oh, honey, I’m been nearly where you are. Ten years ago, I couldn’t work or attend social events. Friends disappeared into thin air. I was luck though – my dear husband learned about Migraine and worked to understand. He’s been my rock. Get your family to read this piece, and let me know if there’s anything I can do to help. I just sent you a friend request. Let’s put our heads together on how we can get your family to understand. OK?

  • Kimberly Rice
    7 years ago

    Thank you for all the work you do, and everyone you help to educate, on our behalf! After 30 years of this, I am ready for a little more understanding and a little less doubt!

  • Teri Robert
    7 years ago

    You’re welcome, Kimberly! I’m with you on more understanding and less doubt! Let’s make 2012 a year to make some of that happen. 🙂

  • Sara Batchelder
    7 years ago

    Thanks Teri!

  • Teri Robert
    7 years ago

    You’re welcome, Sara!

  • Josie Hernandez Janz
    7 years ago

    Thanks to Ashlie for this.

  • Lijdia Voogdt-Koole
    7 years ago

    Great article, thank you Teri!

  • Teri Robert
    7 years ago

    You’re very welcome!

  • Emily Glasson Craig
    7 years ago

    Great article.

  • Debra Parnell Turberville
    7 years ago

    I feel terrible for my daughter right at this very moment. She has suffered since her teen years with migraines and I haven’t always been as understanding as I should have been. We need to get the word out for all migraine sufferers. This has been in our family for generations.

  • Diane Rivard Hart
    7 years ago

    I have a friend who had migraines for years … turns out she was allergic to carpeting. She removed the carpeting from her home and within a week or 2 the migraines were gone … one can’t always avoid carpeting, though.

  • Diane Rivard Hart
    7 years ago

    This was an interesting paragraph. People think perfumes and cologne are benign … to MANY, they are not: Migraine attacks are precipitated by the Migraineur’s exposure to Migraine triggers. Migraine triggers are physiological, not emotional. Each Migraineur’s triggers are different from those of other Migraineurs. Potential triggers include:

    •Perfumes and fragrances. Just being around someone wearing fragrance can trigger a devastating Migraine attack for some people.
    •Bright and/or flickering lights, including fluorescent lighting. Some Migraineurs cannot work in fluorescent lighting. Some need to wear sunglasses at times, even indoors.
    •Loud noises and crowded places.
    •Changes in the weather and/or altitude.
    •Cigarette smoke; exhaust fumes; odors or fumes from chemicals, including some cleaning products.
    •Certain foods, especially foods prepared with MSG and other preservatives.

  • Debra Parnell Turberville
    7 years ago

    Every time I see one of your posts about your migraines I pray for you. I think you and BJ have them almost the same. She has them over 15 times a month. We went to a seminar about the Reed Procedure where they implant a battery with the electronic stimulus that you can control that has been very successful. Most insurances pay the cost and you try it out first to see if it works and you can tolerate it. There is a doctor in our area that is affiliated with Dr. Reed. Dr. Reed is from Texas. You can check them out on the web.

  • Deb Bair
    7 years ago

    Yeah, i hope not. =/

  • Debra Parnell Turberville
    7 years ago

    My mom had them real bad for years, BJ the same and Erin, but not as bad as BJ. Hopefully they won’t increase as she gets older

  • Deb Bair
    7 years ago

    Aw, it’s been in my family for generations as well. Which daughter has migraines?

  • Christine Busby
    7 years ago

    I was the only person I knew of locally that actually has migraines, until my son and niece started having them too. We see a neurologist to help, but they just handed us pills. I take so many pills that my stomach is torn up most of the time.

    I’ve searched for a migraine specialist near by but cannot find one. If anyone knows of a specialist near SC, I’d appreciate the information. I’ve had them for 23yrs and they are getting worse.

    Also, I hate having to explain to my son that his true friends will still be there after each headache is gone. It is lonely when no one else is going through the same things. You start to feel as if you’re crazy, which is crazy.

    Thank you Migraine.com for showing us that we aren’t alone.

  • Teri Robert
    7 years ago

    Christine Busby, you’re very welcome.

  • Christine Busby
    7 years ago

    Teri Robert thank you. There were three in NC

  • Teri Robert
    7 years ago

    Hi, Christine,
    Check out my list of patient recommended Migraine specialists at http://www.helpforheadaches.com/doctors/migraine-headache-specialists.htm
    Hope this helps!
    Teri

  • Cherise Bratcher Enterline
    7 years ago

    I got a migraine Thursday, threw up, felt better, and then it came back. Is that possible? It’s been three days now of it being really intense and then feeling better. Medication has not helped. In fact I have had reactions to most so far. Just want to cry, but that hurts too much,

  • Anne Callister
    7 years ago

    My migraines began when I was 13 and for the first year, I always told my parents that I just had a bad headache. I had of course secretly convinced myself that I must have a brain tumour and I felt so alone and afraid. My migraines were full-blown, with every classic symptom, and I always had to leave school when I saw the “aura” flickering. I knew that I had about 15 minutes to get home, and hopefully fall asleep before the nausea and throbbing pain began. (no medication was available at that time) That first year, I had an attack every 2 weeks, so eventually the school notified my parents, implying that I was skipping school! They met with my teacher who intuitively asked if anyone in our family suffered from migraines! My father suddenly recalled that as a teen, he had been diagnosed with what was known at that time as “sick headaches”! So finally we knew that there was a hereditary connection! The frequency and severity of my migraines subsided during my parenting days. However, I’m now 62, and lately I have been experiencing auras without pain, but I understand that this is normal for my age. This migraine website is a wealth of information, and has certainly answered many of my questions! Its a real blessing to all of us, and to those who care about us! Thank you!

  • Teri Robert
    7 years ago

    Thanks to all of you who commented. I keep copies of this in my purse so I always have one with me to share with people who need a bit of educating about Migraine disease.

  • Nikki Wills
    7 years ago

    I keep a copy in my desk at work.

  • Pam Horgan
    7 years ago

    Very informative! Thanks for sharing, Teri and I hope you are having a nice thanksgiving. I did.

  • Kristen Fitzgerald
    7 years ago

    good idea Teri! Happy Thanksgiving!!!

  • Dawn Forrester Price
    7 years ago

    This is a good introduction for people who think migraine is just “a bad headache.” There is so little real information available that even some migraineurs don’t understand the extent of their disease. They continue to put themselves at risk by trying to “tough it out” through devastating migraine attacks, since people (yes, even some doctors) keep telling them that it is all in their head. No folks, even the symptoms are not all in our heads. Please share this information. If 37 million Americans suffer from this disease then no doubt you know a migraineur who would benefit from your understanding and support!

  • Bear Peterson
    7 years ago

    Thanks for another great article Teri!

    On Mom’s side of the family my grandparent had 27 grandchildren, 17 of us have moderate to extreme problems with migraine, That’s just a hair under 63%, I think that is pretty good anecdotal evidence that #1 is correct.

    When it comes to doctors, one thing that happens to us that shouldn’t is if we have bad luck with one doctor after another, we often get accused of being a “drug seeker” and get documented as such in our medical record. I don’t know of any other group who get treated that way when seeking relief from their ailments, do you?

  • debbiewheaton
    6 years ago

    yea worse when you have to go to the ER

  • Rebecca Ellerbrock Adcock
    7 years ago

    Having worked in a pharmacy and the medical field for over 20 years, yes, there are many other groups that get labeled as drug seekers. It is not even close to being limited to migraine sufferers. There are chronic pain patients whose ailments cant be “proven” just like us. Fibromyalgia is another disease that can’t be proven. Yes, living with migraines is beyond difficult and I am blessed to have a fantastic migraine specialist who does happen to be a neurologist and he listens to his patients and treats accordingly. Wish everyone was as lucky as I am in that respect.

  • Teri Robert
    7 years ago

    You’re welcome, Bear, and thank you! There was Migraine on both sides of my family. My brother and I both have it as do both of his children. My kids aren’t mine biologically, but they both married Migraineurs, and four out of nine grandkids have Migraine so far. 🙁

    You’re right about the issue with doctors. Migraine is invisible, and there’s no diagnostic test to confirm it. So many people HAVE lied about having a Migraine to get meds in the ER that we’re now all paying for it.

  • Val Milo
    7 years ago

    Very important info to share with those who care about someone with migraines…They’re scary for us, so imagine how scary they are for friends or our kids who don’t understand.

  • Laurie Nueske Weil
    7 years ago

    Thanks for sharing.

  • Jennifer Kessler
    7 years ago

    I recommend all my fellow migraine sufferers read and share this.

  • Teri Robert
    7 years ago

    Thanks, Jennifer!

  • Joanne Glynn
    7 years ago

    I’m sending this to all my friends and family in hopes the read and comprehend it. My guess is they still won’t get it! I started a blog for them too but the depth of it all is very hard to put into words. This article came very close. Good luck with the holidays fellow sufferers. Migraine-madness.bloodspot.com

  • Rebecca Chase-Keates
    7 years ago

    So true! Everyone, please read.

  • Ginny Weltzin
    7 years ago

    Great Article. Migraines can be so scary when you get the aura symptoms, they mimic a stroke. For years I worried, it nice to finally understand, know what to expect & know there are many others who experience this.

  • Gabrielle Mickels Brooks
    7 years ago

    Great article about how a migraine sufferer feels and what we want to tell our friends & family… Please read if u have someone with this disease.

  • Teri Robert
    7 years ago

    Gabrielle Mickels Brooks Thanks!

  • Gabrielle Mickels Brooks
    7 years ago

    if you don’t read the article, here is one of the most important….”Migraine is a genetic neurological disease. Although the cause and pathophysiology of the disease is not yet fully understood, current research indicates that it’s caused by genetics and overly sensitive neurons in the brain that fire in a wave when someone with Migraine disease encounters a Migraine trigger. At this time, there is no cure for Migraine disease.” migraine.com

  • Rhonda Jarvis Budd
    7 years ago

    Great article. It’s an awful disease.

  • GodsGirl IsReal
    7 years ago

    this is a great article.

  • Maxine Portugal-Mackey
    7 years ago

    Lot’s of good information. Thank you.

  • Poll