Completely unofficial made-up migraine types: The Creeper

Completely unofficial made-up migraine types: The Creeper

*Unofficial migraine type.

There are all types of formal diagnoses for illnesses, and even in dealing with migraine disease, there are myriad ways the disease can present itself from person to person, episode to episode.

Today I would like to describe a type of migraine I tend to get a lot, one whose made-up name will not be found in any textbook or medical papers because I made it up.  Despite my never having read explicitly about this type of migraine episode, I have confidence that at least some of you out there have had the kind of migraine I’m about to describe. I call it…The Creeper.

You know those days when you are feeling clear-headed, positive, and healthy? Few aches and pains, no headache, no suspicion that one’s coming? (Sadly, chronic migraineurs have fewer of these days than do episodic migraineurs, but I hope we all know the feeling of having had a symptom-free day.)  Well, those days are fabulous. I am not here to talk about those days.

I’m here to talk about a certain type of migraine that can be part of an in-between day (an idea I’ve described on Migraine.com before in a post called “The In-Between Days: When You Don’t Have a Full-Fledged Migraine But Aren’t Yourself Either”).


The Creeper is the migraine that is sneaky.  It will perhaps greet you first thing in the morning, a twinge behind your right eye.  “Hello!” it says. “You haven’t forgotten me, right? Cause I’m here!”  With dread, you climb out of bed, expecting that this will be a migraine day. But, lo and behold, after having breakfast and coffee you realize with a start that the migraine is showing no signs at all.  Maybe that was a fake-out!

A little bit later that morning, you drop a sock on the floor when doing laundry. You bend over to get it and—boom!—you feel a little twinge in your head.  Is that…is that the migraine? Is it coming today, or just creeping around the periphery?

Perhaps, if you’re like me, the afternoon is a hurry-up-and-wait game you play with the migraine.  A friend calls to see if you want to meet up for happy hour, and you’re not sure if you should say yes, cause what if this turns into a full-fledged attack?  The back of your neck is throbbing off and on, and your phonophobia (sensitivity to sound) seems to be kicking in every time the phone rings.  But still…the nausea, the head pain, the other parts of the migraine aren’t showing up.

The Creeper, in my warped imagination, is like this mean little leprechaun figure who wants to just remind you that it’s here, that at any second it can highjack your entire day or your entire week.  Feeling good for a few minutes? Well, have a dose of this photophobia and sense that uneasy feeling you get shortly before a so-called “real” migraine sets in.  The Creeper may never show up that day, but it has let you know, beyond the shadow of a doubt, that there’s no way you’re safe from migraine today.

Have you ever met The Creeper?  What kinds of other completely unofficial types of migraine do you consider yourself to have? (I have a list of a few silly types like this I may write about, but I’ll write about your suggestions, too, if I can identify!)  Let me know your thoughts in the comments below.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

View Comments (120)
  • nehcterg
    7 months ago

    I have The Thumb. It’s not severe. At least not at first. Some pressure at the temple. Then most of the day just like a thumb pressing right in at the temple. Everywhere else is ok most of the day until I can’t habdke the Thumb anymore

  • taraceleste
    2 years ago

    I get those as well. The best way I can describe is that it’s just lingering somewhere in my head. Making sure I don’t lose focus on the possibility that I could be attacked at any moment. But I do have to say…. If given the choice of what I had to deal with everyday…. I would choose the lingerer. Hahah.

  • UKuser
    2 years ago

    It never ceases to amaze me how much we all identify these unofficial type of symptoms

  • 1t0y0db
    4 years ago

    I totally get these. I thought I was just crazy. Thank goodness and I’m sorry I’m not the only one.

  • julie
    4 years ago

    Yes yes and yes to almost every post. This is my life also

  • julie
    4 years ago

    Julie

  • msruff
    4 years ago

    Actually, I’ve changed my mind. It’s not a Creeper, it’s a Lurker, forever playing hide-and-seek. ‘Here I am, but I bet you can’t catch me!’ it taunts throughout the day.

  • Jack
    4 years ago

    I know the Creeper very well. It is always problematic when I’m planning to go out. Either to run an errand or to meet a friend. Do I stay home, or do I take a chance?

    At least the Creeper shows himself. My arch enemy is the Hammer. The Hammer strikes without warning, no advance notice at all. Just BAM! instant 9. Hammer always hits when I’m not in reach of my dark, quiet bedroom. I dislike all migraine, but I hate the Hammer. One day, the Hammer is the one that will be the end of me.

  • msruff
    4 years ago

    The Creeper. What an apt description. I’m having one of those days today, and it’s driving me nuts. Just when I think I can take a breath, there it is — “You haven’t forgotten that I’m here, right?” Yeah, right.

  • Angel
    4 years ago

    Yes, I’ve met The Creeper – he’s usually hiding around the corner, waiting for just the right trigger, a bright light, a loud noise, a strong odor, etc to show his ugly face.

    However, my least two favorites (b/c there are many) are The Killer and The Toilet Hugger. The Killer sneaks up on me from out of nowhere & rams an ice pick into my right temple – then he hangs out for a few weeks. (Yes, I said weeks – his average visit is 3 weeks.) Then there’s The Toilet Hugger – I’m lucky that I USUALLY do not get nauseous w/ my migraines; however, when The Toilet Hugger comes around, I can’t hold down anything, not even water, for a day or two or three.

  • maxgordon
    4 years ago

    Yes, I know The Creeper. It is the opposite of the Bolt, which seems to occur with no warning at all (“What did I miss? Where did THIS come from?”), and closely related to the Nag, which is the migraine that hovers at level 2-4 for days before finally flaring up into a screaming 8-10. All of these make working (I am a writer and editor) difficult if not impossible. You know you have chronic migraine when the first thing you do every morning is rate your headache, and when you partner asks (multiple times every day), “How’s you head?”

  • Kim DH
    4 years ago

    I know the Creeper well! When it comes, I think, “Maybe I can avoid taking meds today, since it’s just a mild headache?”, because of course with 20+ migraines a month, my neurologist tells me to try to cut down on the Almotrex. So, I don’t take anything, then, Bang! the Creeper goes from being a mild annoyance to a full-blown attack! So much for cutting down on meds!

  • Chellie
    5 years ago

    Being the only person in my family with chronic migraines and after reading this article I thought to myself, “Finally, some one understands me!” Don’t get me wrong, my husband and the rest of the family try to understand and learn but they just don’t truly grasp what it’s like to be a migraineur.
    I get this type of migraine a lot but I call mine “The Shadow!” Just like you stated, I wake up with “The Shadow” lurking around the side of my head. He tries to hide but I know he’s there hiding, waiting for me to make slightest wrong move so he can slowly show his ugly face.

  • msruff
    4 years ago

    Nobody can truly understand unless they go through it themselves. I never understood my mother’s chronic headaches for thirty some-odd years until I got one, and which didn’t go away for 15 1/2 years (yes, YEARS).

  • msmarguet
    5 years ago

    ooo my this is so helpful! . .. since my migraines are episodic i thought these creepers were the result of some other ailment / or what some refer to as a little “bug”. i didn’t know we can have some symptoms without having the full-on attack. i have always attributed these “creepers” as hyper-sensitivity to my environment . .. sometimes i even think it’s my fault for being “nervous”.

  • Angel
    4 years ago

    Google “silent migraine” – the symptoms of a migraine w/o the headache – could be that… but it isn’t you or anything you’re doing.

  • Patricia Themaras
    5 years ago

    I think I have the doppelganger to the creeper, mine I call the sneeker! The day goes well then, wait, there is something terribly wrong here, what is, what is happening to me, Oh, Oh no! I’ve got to get to bed because I think a 747 has just crash landed on my head! It just sneaks up on me and suddenly I am feeling really, really bad. I’ve got to throw my head on a pillow, in bed and stay there. I never even had a headache until I reached 36. Now, I feel I have just lost the last 20 years of my life. My last boyfriend’s parting words were to simply call me a “lazy sloth”. Insult to injury.

  • Kevin Laufer
    5 years ago

    My Creeper rarely starts with pain but does “Creep” with auras. Boy, do I ever hate that loss of site, then i am all prepared to take my “Creeper” meds then my vision returns with no Migraine! Sometimes i will even take my meds and nothing happens and I have wasted a precious pill. Frustration!!!!!

  • Rose
    5 years ago

    Can’t tell you how much this resonates with me! The Creeper always causes me to dither on whether or not to take my (expensive) Relpax. When I do decide to hold off on “the big guns” and then get a headache, I beat myself up for “allowing this to happen.” Thanks for giving this type of chronic migraine a name — I think it will help me cope with it in future(and blame “The Creeper” instead of myself!)

  • Bill K
    5 years ago

    The creeper sounds like the typical, non-migraine day for me. Kind of a postdrome until the big one strikes a day or two later. Then the cycle keeps duplicating, like an endless loop. I’ve tried so many prevention meds, but my provider may not offer the right meds for me. I love this forum because I can see I’m not alone & it gives me some good ideas that I’m unable to think of myself due to these stupid cognitive problems.

  • Silergrace
    5 years ago

    I also call mine “creeper”. Mine crawls up the back of my neck; then I know it’s coming. I know then to get things in order because I’m going down. My sense of smell is also very sensitive. I take Topamax 3x/day @ 100mg ea for prevention. I’ve tried other meds for whenever I feel “creeper” coming but none of them work; therefore, my migraine and I settle in for our fight together. 🙁

  • Angiestl
    5 years ago

    I’m so well acquainted with this type of migraine that we are unfortunately on a first name basis! I’m very lucky that nausea is pretty low on my list of symptoms, but when the creeper has come out to play, and oh how it likes to play!, nausea is definitely one of the things it likes to throw into the mix every once in a while to tease me, to get my attention. Such a playful but oh so mean little thing the creeper is!! Great article!!

  • mjosef
    5 years ago

    I know could have been writing this post myself, it rings so true! At 46, I’ve had migraines for 4 decades although they were not diagnosed accurately until I was 32. I am now a teacher and when I see those few kids who are exhibiting the symptoms I’ve experienced my heart breaks for them. Unless you have migraines, have REALLY studied them (I have an amazing set of docs), or have experienced them through an intimate relationship (my entire family finally gets how bad it is), you just can’t really understand how much it affects us.

  • Marjieoc
    5 years ago

    I know The Creeper well. It’s a rare day when he or one of his nastier accomplices (The Jackhammer or The Brain Inflator) fail to make an appearance.

    However, I occasionally have truly terrific days! I’m full of energy and feel almost euphoric. Unfortunately I’ve discovered that feeling so great is usually part of a prodrome, and I’ll have a migraine within 12 to 24 hours. (Maybe I should dub those good days The Delusionist and the ensuing migraines The Blindsiders.)

    I try to enjoy those happy, healthy-feeling days as much as possible and avoid thinking about what’s coming. At least they serve as a warning to do as much as I can while I feel good. Who knows when it will happen again?

  • larubia66
    4 years ago

    Delusionist and The Blindsiders – great names for bands, bad names for migraines – UGH! >_<

  • Angel
    4 years ago

    I have those truly terrific days sometimes, but I never thought of them as prodome. I almost always get a migraine the next day(s) – I’ve always thought its punishment for doing too much the previous day. Thanks for the insight.

  • Javalin
    5 years ago

    This is my first post! 🙂 I was diagnosed a year ago and since then I’ve called these days nagging headaches. If I wake up and it’s a “creeper” kind of day I will wait to take my abortive medicine unless I know I have something going on. My son (six) is visiting me for Christmas and today was bound to be one of those days. Does anyone else find that your medication will help creepers from becoming full fledged attacks, but doesn’t keep the creeper at bay?

  • Angel
    4 years ago

    Kristin Carty,

    I take Relpax as well – you can get a discount card from your neurologist or the company that makes it, which will drastically reduce the co-pay, $10, I think.

    Hope that helps,

    angel

  • Kristin Carty
    5 years ago

    Hi Javalin. I was diagnosed 16 years ago, and from 2007 until this past September I’ve had one every day. I started getting botox a year ago and found that when the creeper comes a relpax, a a promethazine, darkness and sleep work the best. Is stilla couple days stuck inthe house, but at least i can be social! Relpax is new for me and it’s really expensive, as is the botox, but I always fill all my migraine meds even if I don’t take them (I have imitrex tabs and the shots too) so I always have a back up. As a last resort you can ask your Dr if these expensive treatments are an option. I wish you the best of luck. My daughter is 18 and I feel like I’ve spent most of her life in bed. Good luck! 🙂

  • Ann Bailey-Schreier
    5 years ago

    I am very familiar with “The Creeper” My constant companion. My own unofficial type is the ICEPICK headache. Sudden stabbing, piercing pain that feels like it goes thru your head. You expect to find entry and exit wounds. Always sudden, and can last from 30 seconds to 2 minutes. Leave me feeling exhausted and anxious. I have been dealing with migraines for 30 years now, with varying degrees of success. The headaches them selves have changed periodically , but have never left. Feeling like I have run out of options and just try and manage to have a life.

  • Susan Wonderly
    5 years ago

    I have tried many homemade remedies that have not come to fruition. I wore a lemon slice on my forehead for a day, drank tea, used cinnamon in tea, drank lots of water, and on and on. What I have found to help, possibly in my mind only, but I no longer have to try to wrap my hand and arms around my head, is a long ice pack for the front and a small one for the back. I wrap them in towels so not to give myself a brain freeze. Sometimes they do get warm, but I have realized this after I have been sleeping. Sleep is Good when I have a migraine. I don’t have to focus on the head pain. I have had less since I have gone through menopause, and I thank God for that. Those had been hormonal driven. I also am wearing a night guard to stop episodes from occurring in the night. I was clinching my jaw waking up with full blown migraines. Talk to your dentist and see what he/she says about that. My migraines have decreased by at least half. So to you that are pre-menopausal there is some hope down the road. If my suggestions help just one of you I will be happy, Best to you all.PS I hate the hangover!

  • Catherine
    5 years ago

    Reading this makes me SO happy, because you have just described six out of seven days for me. The whole issue of “do I take medication now or hold off” and “should I take the Zomig since it feels like a migraine or the Norflex in case it’s really a tension HA,” etc., etc. is such a huge part of chronic migraine, and no one without Creepers understands. Thanks for a good laugh and the sense that there are others out there who are sitting here at this very moment thinking, “Is Monday too early in the week to start using my supply of Zomig”? 🙂

  • JaneG
    5 years ago

    I am so familiar with the “Creeper”. It hangs around all day. I wrangle with the decision to medicate or not. Is this headache going to be medication-worthy? You are stuck. If you dose too early, you waste a precious dose of your only two days, two doses/day allowed per week. If you dose too late, the med might not even be very effective. And of course, I can never get through the night with my head down without the headache flaring out of control so I always end up medicating at 2am. Why didn’t I just do it earlier and avoid the suffering? I guess it is still that sense of denial and hope so many of us have that keeps us going through the days which is really just delusion. If only meditation and relaxation would Really make it go away, not just make it a little better. If only we didn’t have to worry about rebound.

  • Cannon1455
    5 years ago

    I know exactly what you mean about “wrangling” with the decision to medicate or not. It might work and it might not – and if it doesn’t , I always feel like I’ve made the migraine angry because it gets much worse! When that happens I have to exceed dosage over a period of days to finally get rid of it.

  • Mojoforme
    5 years ago

    I call mine “popcorn neck” because when I turn my head it pops when I am getting a migraine. Sad to say I am chuckling at everyone’s responses because I can relate to a lot of them. Question – has anyone heard noises in their head when they get a bad migraine? Don’t laugh – I get light saber sounds. Its like having my own star wars movie.

  • Brooke Collins
    5 years ago

    I have “popcorn neck” too! The light sabers, no. haha

  • anita.a
    5 years ago

    Ok here’s one for you. ‘Migraine hangover’ technicaly the ‘postdrome’ effects. That horrid wrung out feeling you know means it could start up any time. I forget the proper name for that phantom feeling. Like there is something on your head, or even worse IN it! I was lucky. Neurologist # 2 knows head pain. He TAUGHT me all about this bloody evil condition. Did you know just having a minor virus in your system, barely bad enough to trigger a fever can trigger a vascular migraine ? We migraine suffers live on a knifes edge. But we are tough!

  • anita.a
    5 years ago

    My dr told me thats called a ‘predrome.’ Basically an early warning that conditions are right for one. I avoid all triggers and maybe take my abortive med just in case. I also call it an evil shoulder riding gnome with a sledge hammer. Got one right now in fact. Grr!

  • carla-fisher
    5 years ago

    Ralph- headache that comes on strong than tones down after you talk to ralph on the big white telephone Then comes strong till you talk to ralph again then Tones down. Repeating the phone call to ralph that Lasts for days and days. Lasts so long you might as well add ralph to the family tree.

  • Wendy
    5 years ago

    I have the same “creeper” days but I call them “sensitive.” As in, “How does your head feel today? It feels very sensitive.” Thanks for posting about this. When I try explaining this feeling, it just sounds like gobbledygook. Chronic migraine is difficult to explain and even harder to understand…I still don’t know how a person’s head can hurt as often as mine/ours does.

  • Val Frost and Bubbles
    5 years ago

    After 52 years of the “variety pack”, your “creeper” is my “sleeper”. It sleeps quietly for most of the time and then when you least expect it, “BANG!”, it “spikes”. This happens off and on – just reminding me that it’s still there. Annoying? You bet. But a cup of fresh Salada Orange Pekoe tea, my pills, and just resting for a bit on the veranda with my Newf Service Dog, Bubbles, and it generally gets the hint to cease and desist – or else. Val Frost and Bubbles

  • patD
    5 years ago

    I didn’t know there were others who had the ‘Creeper’ too. Most days, I feel like I’m going nuts. Just trying to determine if it’s a migraine or not and whether or not I’m going to be wasting my pain meds that I could be saving for the full blown migraine. I have ‘super sonice hearing’ (my husband says that) and when I have a migraine the noises are amplified so much more. Even the sound of the air blowing out the vents when the central air kicks in–:)

  • Brooke Collins
    5 years ago

    YES!!! me, too! I hate the struggle over whether to medicate or not!

  • not so joy
    5 years ago

    The Creeper frequents me and brings his friend, the Stalker. Where the Creeper hangs out and makes you feel that you are one trigger short of having a full blown migraine; the Stalker likes to jump up and down on a symptom. Whether it is my eye twitching for long periods of time all day or being nauseous all day or any one of a myriad of discomforts/annoyances/aggravations/pains he can find. For me Creeper and Stalker are conjoined twins that are never far away.

  • sammijohnson
    5 years ago

    YES!! This describes the majority of my severe / migraine headaches.

  • mindzfuleez217
    5 years ago

    The ‘Creeper’ is a feature of migraine that not only taunts but somehow warns, that at any moment, a full blown episode is around the corner. I find that weather or swift barometric pressure changes precipitates that process.So preparing to look out for the “Creeper” goes hand in hand with the atmosphere.

    Light, sound, movement, smell, visual or speech becomes slow motion yet magnified by extreme sensitivity.Creeper? Nope-just plain ‘Creepy’. How about when the words you want to say come out different than intended? I call that part of my chronic migraines the “Jumble-Mumble”. For example, want to say “whose new red car is that?” Instead it comes out “big blue truck over there”.

    Oh the elusiveness of visual aura warnings, those are what I call “blinking lens negative’s” where any image or anything looked at, when blinking it turns into an image like an old fashioned photo negative.

    Sounds…oh those are actually like fingernails on a chalk board. Like my cat, whose meow pierces my ears to the point of needing to wear earplugs. (also have a set of moldable plugs just in case need to muffle noises)

    The most difficult aspect of “migraines” is that they are completely invisible to others unless of course they render you incapacitated, vertically resting with your hands or arms wrapped around your head as you lay motionless, voiceless, and simply unable to move.

    Yet, there are so many medication options…hey what about the injection into your leg? Simply does not work quick enough. The dissolve-able wafers seem to work the best.Or listening to the bodies cues to take the “creepiness” to “creeping” into a place of silent motionless existence, even just long enough to thwart off that little ugly leprechaun.

  • Jacquelyn Davis
    5 years ago

    OMG… this is exactly what I go through. I don’t know how many times I’ve had to slink as softly as I could to the bedroom, pull the blinds, slip into bed without making any kind of sudden movement, place a pillow on both sides of my head and one under my head, pull up the covers, then wrap my hands and arms around my head and try my best not to cry (which makes the pain even worse). Have to lay as still as possible. Then realize that the silence is deafeningly loud and making my head pound even worse, so I roll over and turn the radio on to the bare minimal volume. Then pray that I can just get the pounding to slow down enough to fall asleep (which usually takes forever – sometimes never). The NEVER days I have to go ahead and take the Ketorolac and Phenergan so I can just pass out. The rest of the day is ruined for good at this point.

    I’ve also woke up and had this little voice tell me not to move, but I don’t listen and as soon as I move my head the pain starts in – how I hate those days. But I get up and try to go about my normal day, but the “creeper” keeps reminding me that I’m not out of the woods. Sometimes the pain is just about to the point of being unbearable (but not quite) and this goes on all day long (off and on). Makes the whole day miserable.

    This morning I woke up feeling fine, and sat down to read the newspaper when I realized something was wrong with my vision – I could see shimmering effects from my left eye. I tried to ignore it, but it kept getting worse. When I shut my eyes I could see a “C” shaped line of yellowish gold lights with black zig-zag lines running along it. I couldn’t get away from this crazy light, it was there when my eyes were open and it was there when they were closed. Very irritating. This lasted about 20 minutes. In the meantime I got up to go to the bathroom and felt horrible – the only way to describe it was like I had little tiny toothpick legs and the rest of my body was a huge watermelon. I felt so unbalanced and felt so top heavy. That lasted about 8 minutes. Then I was standing at the counter and my left leg began to tingle then go completely numb, the my left hand started tingling. This lasted for about an hour. I honestly thought I may have been having a stroke or something. I’m going in to see my doctor soon about what happened. But after I did some research this morning I think what I experienced was an aura that precedes a migraine attack (visual and sensory). I’ll still go to the doctor just to make sure though. My head hurts off and on, but it’s not bad.

    Just thought I’d share my experience.

  • anita.a
    5 years ago

    Mumble jumble is actually called ‘aphasia. ‘ you sound like we have similar conditions.

  • janenez
    5 years ago

    “cement neck” and “marine compass head”. That’s two common ” made up” types for me. Cement neck is when the migraine reaches down into my neck, my muscles get so tight I can’t move it. “Marine compass – or boat compass head” – have you ever seen a boat compass? It floats in a round orb of water kind of like a magic 8 ball. Sometimes my brain feels like that. I move my head and my brain sort of “catches up” – usually goes too far and has to come back to center.

  • evon
    5 years ago

    has anyone had memory issues from having a migraine?

  • carla-fisher
    5 years ago

    By the way I call that one amnesia or CRS-cant remember stuff migraine.

  • carla-fisher
    5 years ago

    Yes, i do. I had one Cmas day last year, my son said I told him to bring the kids over early for hot chocolate. I had no recollection of that conversation at all.

  • evon
    5 years ago

    I have the creeper almost every other day. I have had a mild to moderate migraine since 2007. I have been to numerous doctors and they cant figure out what is causing this. It also hurts that I am allergic to the prescription migraine meds on the market. I have been told by multiple doctors that it is all in my head, lol. I tell them no shit Sherlock. Have any of y’all been able to find some kind of relief besides drugs. I take to many now as it is.

  • anita.a
    5 years ago

    Biofeedback and meditation helped me for years. Now I take migravent (otc supliment) and its given me control. Plus my meds work better so I take less. I take that daily. I take Fiorcet when one starts ( actually double dose, dr approved as I have drug resistance issues) and migranal inhailent if it hits 10

  • spryor
    5 years ago

    Hey evon – see my post below. I love biofeedback. I’m not very good at it myself yet but I’m learning. My Psychologist (referred by my neurologist) does an amazing job of it. I always feel amazing for a few days after a session.

  • spryor
    5 years ago

    WOW – you just described my day today!! No one understands that you feel like that or worse (a full blown migraine) and still just keep working. I don’t talk about it when I don’t feel well. I just fake it best I can. No one understands that you can function with a full blown migraine headache. That when you have them so often, you don’t get the luxury of just going to bed. You learn to function through it. I have Vestbular Migraine and sometimes I get so dizzy I have to “hold a wall up” to walk down a hallway and hope that you don’t throw up before you get back to your desk. Or my favorite, dying with a bladder spasm because the associated neuropathy has kicked in and you’re praying you don’t pee your pants. No one wants to hear you complain, they can’t do anything for you anyway, and they don’t understand, so you just do it alone. Don’t get me wrong I have a good support group but how can they really get it anyway. I’m in the middle of it and I don’t always understand it. Those ‘halfway there’ days are the worst (I like ‘creeper’ to describe it.) You don’t know whether to take meds or not. Such is life it could be worse. 🙂 at least now I know what it is. Much better than worrying about what it could be. Phew – that felt good to spill all that :).

  • spryor
    5 years ago

    Evon – I go to a neurologist that specializes in migraine. How’s this for a diagnosis: chronic complicated vestibular migraine with aura, hyperacusous and periphial neuropathy. I have also tested positive for Meneres. I have gluten, almond, chocolate, and caffeine intolerances. For 10 plus years I’ve had neuropathy including bladder spasm and incontinance without severe headache. the predominate symptom being vertigo probably 80% of the time. I’ve been tested for MS four times, tons of therapy and a surgery for the bladder issues. The severe headaches started approximately 1 & 1/2 years ago. They were so bad I had to wear ear plugs 24/7 for four months. I went to Disneyland with my grand kids and had to run out of the future land in so much pain because of the sound. I went to an ear specialist thinking it was superior canal dehiscence. That’s when I was diagnosed with migraine. I had migraine lesions on my brain. The headaches got so bad that my doctor said they were indistinguishable as separate headaches. They were not healing before the next one began. I was lucky to have a few hours at a time in between headaches. It’s taken several months to get it to where I generally get 10 or so headaches a month. I can feel it coming on by the lightening storms that start in my brain with every sound. I have to sit in the very back at church and have only recently began to sing again. I’m on lamotrigen, verapamil, spironolactone (for Meneres), aspirin – all daily with butalbitol as a back up. All of this coming from someone that could count on one hand the times I’ve been on antibiotics in the first 40 years of my life. I felt like a hypochondriac all the time. I was praying for some horrible diagnosis just so a doctor would believe me. I had one neurologist get mad at me when I had tears because he said nothing was wrong with me. Today I fully function albeit I do it in the midst of a truly painful headache and dizziness at times. It comes from lots of practice for a lot of years. I’m usually very careful about any triggers especially during tax season as I work in a busy accounting office. I wear flat shoes to keep from falling. I’ve learned through balance therapy how to work through and live with dizziness even when walking. I have anxiety which may cause or may be caused by the migraine (a vicious circle) but I practice stress relief methods (breathing, relaxation, and things to sidetrack me.) Currently I’ve been treated with biofeedback which is awesome. We are gradually getting in complete control with a team of great doctors and therapist. I’ve actually gone 5-6 days in a row without headaches and even then they aren’t as bad. As far as it being in your head, my neuropathy is under control when my headaches are. Migraine is a nerve disorder that can affect every nerve in your body. I hope you can find a group of doctors and therapists willing to listen and support you. Meanwhile don’t quit trying. Yoga, meditation,enough sleep, light to moderate exercise (I walk) and diet all help. It’s all a learning process and each person is different. I know this is long but I hope this much of my story helps you in some way :). Good luck!

  • mindzfuleez217
    5 years ago

    Vestibular migraines with aura. That was my official diagnoses, supposedly only 2% of the population have that.So after months of occupational rehabilitation, or re-calibration my severe migraines went from at least 20 a month, to 15 a month. The level of intensity is such a elusive variation there’s just no way to pinpoint symptoms precisely. Chronic migrainer’s, know that these are all real symptoms, that really impact daily life. We are not alone, we are not making it up and eventually our efforts to bring the “Migraine” world to light will be at the forefront of ‘brains’ other than our own.

  • evon
    5 years ago

    I didn’t know what some of my migraine symptoms were called. So with your vestibular migraine, what other types of symptoms do you have as well. I have to wear a Scopolamine patch to just be able to sit up most days. My doctor I have now says it is partial psychological, and he calls them Chronic migraines, I wish someone would be able to help me without saying I am making it up. :(, thanks for listening.

  • Lauren
    5 years ago

    ABSOLUTELY. I don’t know that I could’ve said it better myself. (I hate that other people have the same thing I do/vice versa – but I hope for all of us with migraines that we find something that works for each of us…) I love that I know I’m not just psycho when I say my real symptoms and that I CAN find other people that have them too only to HOPE that maybe all of us will find something that helps so dramatically that it changes all the upcoming migrainers as well as us that will be dealing with it for the rest of our lives (**PS hopefully not the rest of our lives).
    I have “creepers” ALL THE TIME**the name is so true, stressful daily situation will bring daily migraines, weather will cause more issues than I thought previously (believe it’s the pressure differences), when I know I have a lot to do the next day (I’m also ADHD so major stressor for me), also those days when you know that day is going to be crappy anyways from the migraine you woke up with, you take your meds go back to sleep with multiple ice packs on your head hoping it will just freeze it to where you can’t feel anything anymore, but then sadly, wake up to a super-sized enormous one hours later. 🙁
    I hate describing migraines because I feel like I can only relate to the people that have them (1st in my family to have migraines OR anything close to “brain issues” if you call it that.) Sucks and totally know what everyone/most-everyone goes through when that time happens when you “just can’t do it anymore” = just can’t do anything for the rest of the day/night (including plans cancelled, family dinner, etc).

  • Jacquelyn Davis
    5 years ago

    I understand also. I have a person who tells me all the time that I’m not having a migraine. Says “you’ll know when you have a migraine because you won’t be able to raise your head off the pillow”. I used to get mad when I would hear this, but now it doesn’t bother me anymore. I know I have migraines, I know when I’m having a migraine.. but like other’s with this same problem I’ve learned to live with it. I can guarantee you that I can function under a lot more pain than people who don’t suffer migraines. But the main point is that you suffer so much and for so long that there are days when you just can’t take it any more. I don’t know how many times I’ve wished that I could just cut my head off. And I’ve been in so much pain that I can’t understand how a person can continue living like this, wondering what keeps your head from bursting apart. How can a person live with so much pain is beyond me… but we do.

  • evon
    5 years ago

    understand completely Lauren. My family of origin don’t understand because they have never had one. Even my sister who is a RN don’t believe that I am having them, or she says suck it up like I can just tell it to go away.

  • Shani
    5 years ago

    The Creeper lives here too…”nasty being”. Always lurking waiting…..like a robber ready to steal my day, my sanity, my hold on a level 5 pain…slipping…..the pain just exponentially increasing….6…7…til boom!!

  • tinallee
    5 years ago

    Such a fitting name – “The Creeper” is an all too familiar visitor.

  • marti
    5 years ago

    I know just what you mean – I get Creepers all the time. I wake up feeling OK – maybe a little queasy, but not too bad, and after breakfast I feel a little better. I go to work, get busy and distracted, and things continue to build. And by mid afternoon I suddenly realize I’m in agony. I know that sounds impossible; how could I not notice, but I have chronic migraine, so I’m used to hurting all the time, so I’m pretty good at tuning out pain. I try to make myself slow down and pay attention so I can take action, whether it’s a few minutes to meditate or to take medication before it’s too late and the pain gets out of control.

  • 5 years ago

    When I have a ‘Creeper’ I can knock it dead in it’s tracks when I use the headache app on my Iphone. My bio-feedback therapist (who also suffers migraines) showed me. It uses brainwave therapy and relaxation therapy and can take the edge off a full migraine or banish a creeper.
    The App is only $3 and I use it all the time. It is called Brainwave 3D Binaural Programs. Choose the headache brainwave and then choose an Ambience to listen to and drown out the brainwave tones. I use flowing creek and visualize stress or pain being washed away, flowing down inside my skull, through my body and out my feet.

    Also nice is the euphoria program which has Gamma waves. Gamma waves are usually produced during deep meditation. My head feels much better after 15 minutes of listening to this.

  • Evie75
    5 years ago

    This sounds so interesting. I tried to see if I could download the app but I couldn’t find the one you listed. Are you sure that’s what it’s called or is there another name it goes by? I would love to try it. Thanks for the suggestion!

  • arden
    5 years ago

    I get the Creeps after a migraine has been aborted by meds the day before. Its like a hangover mini migraine just to remind me I have not really conquered this miserable demon. It does not put me to bed, it just hangs around making me feel depressed, irritable and touchy for a couple of days.

  • John Jobling
    5 years ago

    I have creepers too, also flashers. The sudden flash of pain, middle of the head, over so fast you just remember it happened. It makes me duck my head. From what I have read on your site it’s probably the Trigeminal nerve just saying Hi! The flashes don’t necessarily precede a full-blown migraine, at least not immediately. The only real harbinger of a migraine that I can identify is life.

    A little history: I am 65. I have had migraines since I was 9, they were one or two a year back then. They became worse 25 or so year ago, and now I have maybe 4 or 5 free days a month. I live on sumatriptan tablets. I am now scared of the sumatriptan injections as the last one caused a vasospasm in my heart and I though I was having a heart attack. It was weird – over the years I must have had nearly 1000 injections, and this was the first time I had any side effect at all.

  • Paulaff
    5 years ago

    Most days I have this kind of ‘migraine’. What’s hard is trying to determine if I should take something for it or not. They say take a med BEFORE it gets too bad, but when can you know if it’s going to get ‘too bad’ to be helped?

  • Marge Kelly Moriarty
    5 years ago

    I too, get these creeper headaches. Had one Sunday evening into Monday. By Monday night my husband had to take me to doctor for an injection as the Maxalt did not help. I have missed work for two days now….. On the mend with prednisone and increasing Nortriptyline to 30 mg at bed. My brain feels swollen, my ears are ringing. I can only tolerate short conversations and minimal tv and computer. I am feeling discouraged as I try to take care of myself and do what’s right…… There is no rhyme or reason to these things….I’ve kept journal and everything…..cannot identify triggers.

  • Kristin Carty
    5 years ago

    Marge Kelly I’m so sorry you’re having trouble with your triggers. There’s a page on this site that lists triggers and symptoms. I also googled symptoms and types of migraines and compiled my list from that. The one on migraine.com is the best. Good luck!

  • kajsa
    5 years ago

    Dealing with one of those right now – twinging behind my eye, intermittent aura, photophobia (as I sit here at work with Theraspecs and a sun hat on), trying to decide whether to soldier on and try to get some work done, despite the distraction of the pain, or to give in and go home and just deal with it before it gets any worse. This gets so wearing.

  • lauriestewart
    5 years ago

    My mother always called this the creeping tiger, every now and then he may roar, but you ALWAYS feel him padding around restlessly at the edges of your mind.
    This is my most common one, i don’t have more than 4 or 5 full blown migraines a year (though they can last up to a week), but this little stinker is a regular visitor.

  • lisamariemary
    5 years ago

    Yep, I know the creeper well. It used to be so confusing to me, but lately he’s here almost daily so I’m getting a bit used to him. He’s a real PITA. Thanks for the article, really helps to know others are in the boat with me. 🙂

  • jessicamadore
    5 years ago

    I have a creeper all the time. I always have that nagging feeling hanging out in the back of my head or tickling my right eye reminding me “hello, don’t do too much…or you will regret it!” Loved this article thanks so much for sharing!

  • K_ot
    5 years ago

    I very much sympathize with you and your poor right eye being inhabited by The Creeper! For the past 5-6 months I’ve had it lerking in my own right eye. Going off the BC pill helped immensely, and starting a prophylaxis has helped a little more, but everyday – whether it’s driving to and from work into the sun, dealing with a crummy client, or treating myself to a little cocktail on the weekend – it always comes back to remind me it’s not gone.

    Great article, I take comfort in hearing everyone’s stories.

  • tricia2990
    5 years ago

    Great article! I’ve had a hard time trying to explain these to my doctors, its like that sound right before the alarm clock goes off (old-school kind) – its there, ready to ring. Usually they are accompanied with teary eye or runny nose on one side.

    I live with “the creeper” almost daily, 50-75% of the time they turn into a full blown migraine. When explaining the “creeper” I say my pain is about a 2 constantly. Co-worker with too much perfume can walk by and Bam! Creeper is now an full blown migraine.

    Sometimes its hard to know when to take the meds but I try to push through until 5pm then make the call. Its hard to plan activities in the evening.

  • Chip&Dale
    5 years ago

    Perfume! Ugh! That and a whole aisle of scented candles in a store! Surefire way to get me going!
    Bath and Bodyworks is a store I have to stay far far away from!

  • Gabymassey
    5 years ago

    For posts and comments like these is exactly why I’ve come to value this site. People who don’t live with this have no possible way of understanding what we all go through. I’ve often said that I wish that there was some kind of rash that accompanied them (sick thought in itself) – but just so that other people can see the invisible monster that’s either stirring, lurking or roaring. Occasionally my husband can see that my eyes, or the right eye, are slightly different, which I don’t see in the mirror.
    I had a wonderful nearly six weeks just now, after I put myself on a(n almost) self prescribed regimen of 5mgs of diazepam every night, since not one single doctor-prescribed preventative over many years has ever made a substantial difference. I think there were only 3-4 full-blown migraines during that time. My doctor warned me that possibly the dosage would need increasing after a while and we’d need to discuss it when it happened. Then a looming trip, heavy humidity, the trip and flights themselves and my return home three days ago…well, it was back to the daily Imitrex(es) and both lurking background migraines as well as more full blown ones than I was hoping for. I’m on my way in a minute for a massage, which will only help really whilst it’s happening and haven’t yet increased the diazepam – but I’m disappointed. Their arrival always disappoints me – I was so proud of having come up with what seemed like a fix (after a horrendous weeks-long phase of daily big ones). I know I need to take an Imitrex right now – to drive away what I know is coming and I’ve just realized that typing this is a way of stalling on that. I’ll stop stalling.

  • carla-fisher
    5 years ago

    I worked with a mean nasty coworker for 8 1/2 years. She self diagnosed her headaches as migraines. I don’t think she did though, she didnt have any of the symptoms. So she would compare my migraines to her tension headaches. So the days when I would have to leave because of one so bad I just couldnt stay at work or have to call in. She would send a message to all our stores degrading me and my migraines. She made it so intolerable that all my fellow employees were calling me a baby. I came to work one time and found a pacifier and diaper on my desk. If she was sick she expected all kinds of sympathy. She would burn vanilla and other candles that had nauseating smells knowing it could cause a migraine for me. Since she knew that highlighters were triggers she would use them intentionally and write all my messages on fluorescent sticky notes. She knew my migraines made it very hard to concentrate so she would do things to get my attention off conversations with customers so they would get flustered with me and I would sound like a blithering Idiot. If i toned down the overhead light at my desk which wouldn’t in any way affect her work area she would complain to my boss and I would have to put the tubes back in. I really thought my daily headaches would decrease when I left there but they didn’t.

  • Janet
    5 years ago

    Are you actually taking Imitrex or the generic sumatriptan? Imitrex helped me greatly but when the generic came out that was the end of the relief.

    Curious……

    Blessings
    Janet

  • lisamariemary
    5 years ago

    The disappointment – yes. OMG, I get that, too. I’m so glad you said that.

  • Chip&Dale
    5 years ago

    I get these quite often but here’s another version.

    I’m irritable, kind of queasy, every single noise is irritating. Every question from anyone (no matter how innocent) seems like a jab or direct hit to my intellect. I’m overly sensitive. I argue with everyone around me. I’m tired and tearful. All I want to do is sleep.
    Then it hits me full on… as soon as I accept the day is a wash and lay down my head throbs. Sometimes it’s accompanied with cyclic vomiting that crashes like waves over me. Always it is accompanied by severe nausea.
    All I want to do is sleep but quite often my migraine is positional. If I lay down not only does the pain get worse but also the nausea and/or vomiting.
    Triptans don’t help. Narcs sometimes do as long as I include an anti-emetic. After about 12-16 hours I finally give up and have someone drive me to the hospital 30 miles away with a bucket between my legs.
    The next day is a fog… usually including gastrointestinal issues ranging from constipation, diarreah, or both. I feel like a zombie.
    Between this and Fibromyalgia I’m never pain free. The odd thing is that when my fibro flares my migraine episodes decrease and when the fibro flare ebbs away the migraine episodes come back with a vengeance.
    I wouldn’t wish this on my worst enemy.

  • carla-fisher
    5 years ago

    Id wish it on that lady i worked with

  • Chip&Dale
    5 years ago

    Lisabfl:
    You’re not crazy and you’re not alone.

  • lmbrackett
    5 years ago

    Sherry, thank you so much for your post! I can relate to most of what you said, but the part about when your FM flares your migraines seem to decrease and vice versa. I have thought I must be crazy when that happens! This site has helped me feel a little better about what I’m going through. It seems that someone shares even my strangest symptoms.

  • aspenmarks
    5 years ago

    OMG, you have just described my headaches to a T. I usually have been getting mine either just before,or during, or just after my menses. But that didn’t happened in the last 3 cycles. During these last 3 cycles I had exactly what you described. I call them ‘teasers,’ like the leprechaun you shared. I have just basically given up on any pain meds. The vicodins, I think, are making me sick to my stomach, the morning after. My headaches also like to be shared be both sides of my head, sometimes simultaneously. I blame that damn leprechaun….

  • Janet
    5 years ago

    Migraine girl,
    I lived with “the creeper” yesterday all day until the migraine monster reared its ugly head. I had a blood test a couple weeks ago that revealed a low glucose level of 56. Had the glucose tolerance test yesterday. Once “downing” that disgusting syrupy drink you have to have, I felt the slam of what I feared would be a whopper migraine. Fasting is never ever for a migraineur..and water alone won’t kill the monster. Being in Atlanta you kow yesterday was an ugly rainy damp cool day…perfect migraine weather…..I held out hoping and praying. By the time bedtime came around the Advil didnt help and out came the frova. As I lay in bed I could hear the ceiling fan motor whirring downstairs in the family room. I have superman hearing, sense of smell..even smells I couldn’t possibly smell…my husband couldn’t believe it helped to go downstairs and turn the switch for the ceiling fan to go off. I have awakened from my cave, 2 frova’s later, klonopin and flexeril to juice a special migraine drink to keep the “creeper” in check….my eye is twitching and I have to wash that new shampoo out of my hair before its too late.

    Blessings
    Janet

  • Janet
    5 years ago

    Arden,
    Forgot to tell you I put in about 1-1/2 cups of water in that juice and some ice cubes….can’t juice without the liquid…you won’t get juice…….ooopsss….sorry.

    Janet

  • Janet
    5 years ago

    Arden,
    It depends on the juicer you have how much of the vegetables you need…I have a vitamix …depending on the size of the beets I use usually 2 beets, tops intact, 3 carrots, 1 Granny Smith apple (always only Granny Smith apples in any juice drink I make because they’re the lowest in sugar) and a good size piece of ginger root.

    Beets are a healing agent and a friend gifted me a book entitled The Juicing Bible…this book lets you know what fruits, vegetables and herbs are good for any particular ailment. I have found some relief in the recipe above….but as we all know…it doesn’t work all the time.

    Let me know if you try it.

    Blessings
    Janet

  • arden
    5 years ago

    What is your special migraine drink?

  • kim716
    5 years ago

    I deal with this all the time as part of an “in between day” or a “real” migraine day. So I never know if it will progress to something serious or just be really annoying. And, like zippy36, are the reason I don’t always take my medication in time – cause I never know.

  • lara
    5 years ago

    All the time. I deal with this all the time. Sitting in class and something is telling me that by the time I get home, I’ll be on my way to a migraine. I strange smell and I’m sick to my stomach and vertigo hits…. then it’s gone only to return again 30 minutes later and bam – headache to migraine. Or I get a regular headache that I think I’ve beaten only to have it return in the night as a full fledged migraine. And I have weather creepers… as weather is a trigger. As the weather begins to change… the migraine starts its pattern. Horrible.

  • zippy36
    5 years ago

    “Creepers” are the reason I do not take my medication in time on many occasions.

  • lmbrackett
    5 years ago

    I struggle with when to take a triptan as well. My insurance only covers so many a month (even with my doctor’s override), they are very expensive to pay for them without coverage, and then there is the rebound concern.

  • michellespeer
    5 years ago

    I have the same problem. I have creepers almost every day. If I took my medication every day I’d end up with more rebound headaches. I have no idea what the answer is.

    I’m having a creeper again today and just feeling so depressed and frustrated all over again.

  • kim716
    5 years ago

    same here.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    5 years ago

    As confusing at it is to determine when to take a triptan, it is recommended by migraine specialists to treat early. You may find this information interesting; http://migraine.com/blog/are-you-an-early-jumper-or-a-waiter/.

    Hope it helps,
    Nancy

  • Marsha
    5 years ago

    I have episodic migraines and I do indeed get creepers! A brief, jabbing pain in my head when everything else feels great; a passing sense of nausea; a tightness at the base of my skull that I can’t shake. It makes it confusing, because I’m left to wonder all day whether a full migraine is on its way and whether I should take a triptan right away to prevent it. Sometimes (probably more often than not), I eventually get the migraine by evening; but sometimes, I don’t. You’re right — creepers give a sense that a migraine is always lurking in the background.

  • kathyhorton-bishop
    5 years ago

    I do not know what a symptom free day is …..chronic almost daily and if not a migraine excruciating pain from fibro….and yes the creeper is real and I know it all too well…it keeps me company on any day I’m not in a full blown attack ……thanks for the analogy and little story it was cute and so true ..if we lose our ability to laugh then we are really in trouble … love your posts … 🙂

  • Chip&Dale
    5 years ago

    Ditto & Amen!

  • Nina Rose
    5 years ago

    I feel like that all the time unless I have a full on migraine. I rarely get an “I feel absolutely perfect” day

  • lara
    5 years ago

    Exactly. I rarely have an “I feel perfect” day. I’ve forgotten what those feel like. It makes me feel like some sort of hypochondriac. My room-mate reminds me constantly that no, I am not blowing things out of proportion or being paranoid.

  • Rhonda Myers
    5 years ago

    I also get the creeper…a lot! But, my worst is the Baseball bat or 2×4. I am sitting there, minding my own business when WHAM!!, I literally feel like I’ve been hit in the head with a bat or 2×4. Instant, excruciating pain hits me like a ton of bricks. It’s the worst ones I get. The second worse ones I get is the Waking Giant. You know, when you wake up to a horrible, throbbing, nauseating migraine. I’m always like “What the hell!!! How do you wake up to a migraine!!” Anywho, does anyone else experience the 2×4 and/or Waking Giant? Wishing you all a migraine free day!

  • carla-fisher
    5 years ago

    I do, its hard to treat early when it comes on that way. A new doc i was seeing said to take a triptan any way. Sometimes it works sometimes it doesnt.

  • mo
    5 years ago

    The Waking Giant is THE WORST for me –cannot move, cannot open my eyes, and if my husband isn’t home to bring me morphine, I’m in bad shape!! How can you wake up in so much pain??? The Waking Giant never gives you a fighting chance…

  • michellespeer
    5 years ago

    Yes, I totally know these two! Thank goodness I rarely get the 2×4, but I get the Waking Giant all the time. I’ve more recently been trying to train myself to wake up before it’s gotten to insane pain, while it’s still working it’s way to that, so I can take something and hopefully catch it early enough. Works sometimes.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    5 years ago

    Hi Rhonda,

    In reading over these responses it’s pretty clear Janet has brought up a great topic. It is so hard to determine when the right time is to take a migraine abortive. Dr. Marcus addresses this issue here; http://migraine.com/blog/are-you-an-early-jumper-or-a-waiter/.

    Nancy

  • simplygourdjus
    5 years ago

    yes! I get “those” a lot! I call mine the “SLEDGE HAMMER”!!
    I’ve been in the mix of the Sledge hammer for about 5 days now. I can feel “okay” for a few hours, then POW!! Slam! to the back of my head!! Instant nausea also follows. Just the slighted bend of my head…..then Mouth Vomit! Not enough to put me to the floor hugging the toilet…….but….enough to push me to take my Promethazine…which will surely bring on sleep mode.

  • slov13
    5 years ago

    Oh yes, my good/creeper times are few and far between, as a Chronic Migraineur for the past 32 years, when I I am blessed enough to have a few hours of respit a couple times a month its great but after 35 years of marriage my husbands is being less supportive than ever…especially during creeper time. But those creepers are righlat the surface waiting to pop out any second and boy do they. If I am lucky enough to have a couple of hours before another full blown migraine hits with the whole Aura, Numbness, Vertigo and nausea and pain throws me back down in bed in my dark “bat cave” trying to help the photophobia and phonophobia. But I tell you, I count my blessings during those few times of creepers (even knowing another migraine is on its way) because at least I am able to spend a little quality time with my precious family and grandkids. My heart goes out to all of you because no-one understands migraine unless they live the disease. Best of luck to all.

  • kathyhorton-bishop
    5 years ago

    i escape to the dungeon that’s my vampire room..super dark cold and quiet most days except for noisy neighbors …looking for a new place with noone living over me ..or right next door ..wish renting a house was more affordable ..

  • windyj2308
    5 years ago

    Love it… I have the creeper too. Never thought of it this way but certainly like this thought.

  • Rex
    5 years ago

    Totally! My sister and I both have had migraine from an early age… we experience one that sounds like the Creeper, but we call it the Pokey. Its like a tightness on the migraine side of the head but hasn’t gotten worse…yet. In emails/text “day was o.k. yesterday, I had a pokey”. The pokey can sometimes go away (usually with Excedrin) or progress into something worse… only the Pokey knows! haha

  • Lisa Riley
    5 years ago

    The Creeper resides in my head too. He’s skulking around already this morning, and is going to get the boot. I love the description.

    My students are recognizing when I have Creeper days vs. full-fledged days. Yes, I’m a teacher. If I hadn’t learned to function through the pain, I’d be in my bed hiding in the dark. I teach Special Education, and they all have special issues. So…we all soldier on together.

  • Katie Smith
    5 years ago

    You just described most of my life that doesn’t have a full blown migraine. And today is no exception. I’ve always been told to take meds at the first sign of a migraine. If I did that there would be no meds left for you! 🙂 My strongest supporter and best friend, my husband, just asked me how I was feeling today. And my response was, ‘vulnerable’. Sometimes I use the term ‘fragile’. He knows what those terms mean. Now we’ll refer to that demon as The Creeper! Being vulnerable and fragile makes me sound weak, so thanks for giving me back that part of my self worth!! Still smiling…hopefully all day! Even with daily chronic migraine I still pray and have hope for a ‘normal’ day.

  • Ricki
    5 years ago

    Great post. I get The Creeper all the time. I find it difficult because I have to change the way I behave, yet to my partner I look pretty normal. For example, I’d need to take an elevator, not stairs. Or, if we’re hiking, I need to do a flat trail, not elevated. I explain by saying that I’m on the verge of a headache, I feel some twinges — but it’s so hard to explain all of the things my body is doing at that time.

  • michellespeer
    5 years ago

    I totally know what you mean. A lot of times I just say I feel “weird”, I don’t know how else to describe it.

  • Clay Fimmel
    5 years ago

    I certainly have those ones. I had named them ‘backgrounders’ Always there just ready to blow up like a balloon. A reminder here, or there, a little pain just to “remind” you that you’re not quite well. I may get several of those during the ‘almost well’ days. The completely well days are quite few, and its so amazing to have them. You can walk with a spring in your step, feel so glad to be alive… that, is quite different from the days when you have the creepers or backgrounders… and then, heaven forbid, the big ones come either like a dark storm gathering, or sometimes like tonight, I’m sure someone hit me on the front side of the head with a hammer..

  • Cindy
    5 years ago

    I had a regular appointment with my Headache Doc on Monday. I told her about this site and the blog about the creeper. I told her that the author of that blog must live in my head or something cause she described it to a T. She said that almost all of her Chronic Migraine Pts. describe the in- between days the same way. She said she was going to check out this site, maybe recommend it to her other pts.

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