How to Afford Acupuncture for Migraines
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If the idea of having small needles placed in various spots on your body doesn’t scare you*, the cost of acupuncture might. Unlike many Western medical treatments, acupuncture is rarely covered by insurance. Each treatment can cost anywhere between $50 and $120, and you may need to come in two or three times each week for the most effective treatment for your migraines. The money adds up fast.

Here are some options for making acupuncture more affordable:

Community acupuncture – Community acupuncture is treatment in a group setting. Costs are kept lower in this kind of setting, enabling you to receive more frequent treatments from qualified professionals. The Community Acupuncture Network offers a search engine to help you find a group in your area: Community Acupuncture Network Search.

Negotiate – Ask the treatment provider if you can get a discount by paying in advance for a package of sessions.

Check with your health insurance provider – Make sure you know what your policy will and will not cover. It’s rare for insurance companies to cover acupuncture, but you’ll never know for sure unless you ask.

Visit a school – Being treated by an acupuncturist in training is an affordable way to get treatments in a safe environment. Find a school near you by searching here: Acufinder.com.

Creative coding – If you see an acupuncturist who is also an MD or DO, the provider may be able to code your treatment in a way that your insurance company will cover the sessions.

Flexible spending account – If your employer provides a flexible spending account program you can pay for your treatments with pre-tax money.

Tax deduction – If you can’t make any other option work you can still try to deduct the cost of any medical treatments not covered by insurance, including acupuncture, from your incomes taxes if you meet certain requirements.

To find a qualified acupuncturist visit: NCCAOM Certified Practitioner Search.

* It really doesn’t hurt. I promise. It’s nothing compared to a migraine, and the needles are small.

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