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Migraine Comorbidities: Fibromyalgia

Migraine disease is not only painful, but can put Migraineurs at an increased risk of having additional illnesses. Migraine is found to be comorbid (diseases that occur at the same time, but do not cause one another) with many conditions including fibromyalgia, heart disease, stroke, and depression.

Fibromyalgia is described as a chronic pain condition which can produce all-over body pain, exhaustion, stiffness, depression, sleep disturbance and anxiety. Many people with Migraine also suffer from fibromyalgia. In fact, Dr. Dawn Marcus reports that “fibromyalgia affects 17 in every 100 people with episodic Migraine” and 35 out of 100 people with chronic Migraine have fibromyalgia.

Currently, the thinking on fibromyalgia seems to be that it’s a neurological condition with an atypical pain reaction not found in healthy people. The exact source of fibromyalgia has not been determined; however, it may be caused (or triggered) by physical or emotional trauma or an infection or virus. This atypical pain reaction produces radiating pain from areas in our bodies called tender points. Some tender points are located in the shoulders and the soft tissue in the back of the neck; other spots are found in the lower back area, hips, elbows, knees and shins.

There are no laboratory tests used to diagnose fibromyalgia, just as there are no tests to diagnose Migraine, so it can take several years and traveling to numerous doctors before an accurate diagnosis is achieved. Due to the non-specific nature of its symptoms, fibromyalgia can mimic other conditions like hypothyroidism, Lyme disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and various sleep disorders. These symptoms typically include:

  • bowel issues (irritable bowel syndrome)
  • chronic widespread pain
  • fatigue
  • memory/concentration issues
  • tension headache
  • unrefreshed sleep

Some of the initial management strategies used to treat fibromyalgia include a regular exercise program (as tolerated), getting a good night’s sleep, eating a balanced diet, stress reduction, massage, acupuncture, and dietary supplements. Other types of treatment include yoga, Tai chi and behavioral therapy. If these treatments don’t seem beneficial, there are now three prescription medications FDA approved to treat fibromyalgia; Cymbalta, Lyrica and Savella.

I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia in 2001 by my doctor who called the situation I was in “desperate,” words I’ll never forget. It was such a relief to have the daily chronic pain validated. But I can also tell you that having fibromyalgia and Migraine is confusing at times. When I have head pain, is it fibromyalgia or Migraine? The times when I have ridiculously bad head pain, nausea, photophobia (sensitivity to light) and phonophobia (sensitivity to sound) there is usually no doubt that I am having a Migraine attack. If this is the case, I usually take Midrin, a Migraine abortive in hopes it stops the Migrainous process. Things aren’t as clear when a tension-type headache (TTH) crops up or if I’m not sure my head pain is a related to Migraine at all. When I suspect a TTH, I place my TENS unit on my shoulders and upper back to see if this will help reduce my pain. To manage my fibromyalgia, I try to keep my stress to a minimum, use my training in biofeedback when necessary and attempt to get enough sleep each night.

Do you experience symptoms of fibromyalgia? Have you been diagnosed with by a doctor? What things do you do to manage your fibromyalgia; I’ve love for you to share them with me.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

1. Ifergane, G. Buskila, D. Simiseshevly, N. Zeev, K. Cohen, H. “Prevalence of fibromyalgia syndrome in migraine patients.” Cephalagia 2006; Apr; 26(4): 451-6. 2. Ader, D. Ph.D., Amour, K,. Matallana, L., Boutaugh, M.L., Clauw, D., Crofford, L., Liller, T. “Questions and Answers about Fibromyalgia.” National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. NIH. July 9, 2012.

Comments

  • AZReynolds
    9 months ago

    No. I have good balance and a very strong voice. I used to sing in a bluegrass band…up against banjos and basses. I have a strong voice. Plus, I used to do the yoga crane pose so my balance is great. I think simply, my neck and back were injured along with my brain. My husband works for the Brain Alliance of Kentucky, and he agrees because of the prolonged fatigue and vision problems after my fall. But he said what they had me do- lying still and sleeping was the best way to heal my brain anyway. There’s just not a lot to do to heal a brain. Unfortunately I developed side effects of migraines and my vision is bad now. I had to start wearing glasses after the fall, but at least my vision came back!

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator author
    9 months ago

    I hear you AZ! When I fell in 1996 and sustained a TBI, my life changed forever. This seemed to trigger additional conditions which leave me in daily pain. Some days are better than others, as I’m sure you know, and I’ve mostly accepted I’ll be in daily chronic pain.

    Hoping you have a low pain day!
    Nancy

  • Rosei
    9 months ago

    I wonder if you could have what I have Arnold’s Chiari Malformation. You have described of my symptoms..

  • Rosei
    9 months ago

    @azreynolds. Previous comment from me

  • AZReynolds
    9 months ago

    I’ve had migraines since the age of 10 when I had a bad fall off a platform onto the back of my head. Lost my vision and was knocked out for 4 days. Obviously a head injury, but the doctor told my mom to just let me sleep it off. I slept for a week. That was the beginning of my pain and fatigue. First just migraines and back/neck aches, followed by a host of illnesses, and eventually diagnosed with MPS in 1985, fibromyalgia in 1992. I have taken more meds than I can remember. I used to rely on pain meds to keep me working, but with these new strong perfumes and detergents, I was chased out of my job due to daily migraines. Insurance only gives us 9 pills per month, but we have to work 20+ days with migraines. Math, anyone? Now that I was forced to retire, I am off most pain meds, but I live isolated. Thanks to all these plug-ins and perfumes, I can’t go shopping, to church or even to the post office. Seldom go out to eat. Even walking my dog is dangerous because of dryer sheets. But I manage ok. I take CBD oil and use CBD lotion daily, take magnesium chelate, Omega-3 fish oil, niacin and gabapentin. I use T-Relief for painful FMS days. The combination of higher CBD oil doses and T-Relief often break migraines. If not, then I go to Relpax and promethazine. Seldom do I break down and take oxycodone. I have learned to accept that I will always live in pain, but that pain is not who I am. I find joy everyday inspite of it.

  • Fredrick Machel
    4 years ago

    My dear brothers and sisters, I am about to tell you how God through the help of an herbal doctor saved the life of my only brother. Fredrick Machel is my name I live in Boston, USA. My brother’s name is John Machel. My only brother four years ago fell ill, and at first was diagnosed of high fever which resulted into him having critical health issues. Two years ago, he was diagnosed of FIBROMYALGIA he was having chronic muscle pain, fatigue, sleep problems, and painful tender points or trigger points, we tried so many medications but none worked for him. I search the internet for possible cure but none was found until i came across a note of testimony made by a man named James Watt on the internet where he claimed that a herbal doctor by name Doctor Uwadia Amenifo cured his cousin of a chronic disease that is worst than FIBROMYALGIA. So I tried to reach the testifier James Watt to ask if there could be any hope from this herbal man towards assisting my brother to finding cure to his ailment. So he emailed me after two days and gave me the contact details of the said doctor. So I emailed the doctor and explained to him what my only brother is going through. And he said no problem that my brother will be healthy again. At first I doubted him because he said it so easily, and at this stage I was so curious and I asked him what he meant by my brother will be healthy again. So then he told me that he have some powerful herbs that can cure FIBROMYALGIA. To cut the long story short, I akin to his advise and counseling. So he told me all I would do, and after all arrangement was made, he started sending herbs to my brother. Behold just two weeks after my brother started using his herbs he began to improve, and as I speak to you today my brother is healthy and free from FIBROMYALGIA. So when I see that my brother have regained back his health I contacted Doctor Uwadia to tell him of the good news. And he asks me to help tell people across the world how powerful his herbs can be. And that is exactly what I am doing now. Brothers and sisters i want you all to help me say a big thanks to God and also to Doctor Uwadia Amenifo. He is really a wonderful herbal doctor. So in case you wish to treat yourself or your close one of diseases please i strongly recommend Doctor Uwadia Amenifo to you all. You can either reach him on his email (doctoruwadiaamenifo@gmail.com), or you call him on his cell (+2349052015874). God bless you all.

  • M_otown
    4 years ago

    I’ve posted some of my story thru Facebook feed but the biggest issue for me now is dealing with poorly equipped health care people, particularly office staff. I’ve taken ambien daily for 15 years, and while I know that’s not recommended and I’ve certainly watched a parade of side effects go by, it’s still the only thing that can give me 6-8 hours of sleep. I’m curious about Elavil and may ask my new doctor about it. It seems fairly easy going and attentive. Need to get back to using my TENS unit as it is hard to determine what kind of headache I’m having a lot of the time. Thanks for the info and support.

  • KarenMarie
    4 years ago

    I have chronic migraines as well as fibromyalgia. I am 56 years old. I was diagnosed with chronic migraines when I was 20, but had been suffering with the widespread pain as well as depression, non-restorative sleep and fatigue for several years before that but did not find a doctor that diagnosed my fibromyalgia until I was 51 after I had a spiral fracture on my ankle and had surgery and the pain got worse over the weeks instead of better. The doctor believes that the fibromyalgia was actually triggered after being thrown by my horse and trampled on when I was 14. I have since been diagnosed with CRPS. I have a spinal nerve stimulator and am currently on a Fentanyl patch, Gabapentin (which I call my “miracle drug), Nortriptilyne, Topamax and Fioricet as a rescue for the migraines. I can’t say that the fibromyalgia or CRPS are well controlled right now as I have a broken finger that has had 2 reconstructive surgeries and next week will have a third one so both have been flaring for over a year at this point due to my finger. I have my good days and my bad…

  • Sarah
    6 years ago

    I have fibromyalgia as well as chronic migraine. I also have hypothyroidism. Psychologically I deal with it all by being light-hearted, cracking jokes, rather than being miserable, woe-is-me despondent. The latter just makes everything seem worse. I wouldn’t wish fibro and migraines on anyone-unless they work for atos, then I might make
    An exception lol. X

  • Melisa71
    7 years ago

    I haven’t been on the site for quite some time since there has been so much happening. I FINALLY just today saw a temp. replacement for my GP that prescribed me Elavil for sleep/migraine/fibro pain.
    I’m in the process of applying for disability and since I can’t work, my kids and I may be moving from Oregon to New Mexico to stay with my parents for awhile. No income means bills can’t get paid. Maybe the heat would be better for me instead of the cold and rain here in Oregon anyway.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator author
    7 years ago

    Yes, Melisa71,life has a funny way of getting difficult! It may take a while to adjust to the new medication, and if you find yourself still to sleepy after a few months, talk to your doctor about adjusting the dose or the time when you take it. That may be helpful.

    Good luck and let me know when you get to New Mexico!!

  • Melisa71
    7 years ago

    Hi Nancy,
    Thank you so much! The Elavil has me sleeping quite a bit the last few days so I don’t have a choice but to take care of myself lol It is a little frustrating because I’ve tried so hard to not wind up in bed and/or just sitting around doing nothing all day; then the meds put me to sleep. I’m still learning to prioritize and not do everything at once. Hard when there’s so much going on 🙂

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator author
    7 years ago

    Hi Melisa71,

    Nice to hear from you. I’m keeping my fingers crossed for you on all fronts; new treatment plan, SSDI and your move!! Try to find time to care for yourself, which many of us forget to do.

  • Julie
    7 years ago

    I did check it out. It is interesting. My MD did a series of blood tests to rule out other illnesses. She said they diagnose Fibryo by a process of elimination but in the 18 tender spots I was tender in 16 of them. The aches and stiffness seem to be getting more pronounced since late Oct when it’s getting colder and the IBS is flaring up and I’m still sticking to my diet since I’ve followed from 2001 that were my IBS triggers but not it’s not helping anymore. And my memory has gone to heck so to speak. The constant aches and pains seem to let up when I take a hot epsom salt bath but I can’t be in the tub all day. I feel more prone to being chilled than before, like I should put on 2 sweatsuits instead of just 1. Geese, is this what it’s like getting old? LOL. But they will call me in for a definative treatment plan when all the bloodwork comes back in.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator author
    7 years ago

    Hey Julie,

    It absolutely may be worth your while to talk to your doctor about changing your medication regime. Cymbalta or Lyrica have been beneficial for some with both migraine and fibro. Did you have a chance to take a look at the link for more information from Dr. Marcus? If not no worries, but when you can, it’s very interesting reading.

  • Julie
    7 years ago

    I had not known about this until just a few days ago, that Fibro and Migraines were Comorbidities. Looking back now through my medical history I can now see a pattern, and one I’m not too thrilled about, as my health declined and in May of 2010 where my Migraines turned to daily Chronic Migraines-there is not a day that goes by. Now I’m wondering with everything else going on, now that I’ve become more atuned to my body, are my headaches (and I hate to use the word headache) really migraines or Fibro related tension head pain?I have constant pains that won’t go away and I feel stiffer and takes me longer to get up and harder to fall asleep but I thought that was part of growing old. And I’m so much more sensative to chemicals, light, sounds, smell, heat and cold than I ever use to be before. I called my family MD but she’s out of the office until next week. I think I need to get to the bottom of this. When I was in the hospital this past summer the doctor assigned to me wanted to put me on Cymbalta to help w/the migraines but I was on Nardil at the time as a migraine preventive and it would seriously counteract. I’m off the Nardil and I think Cymbalta is the right thing to try now. I’m on Topamax 300 mg at bedtime as well as Amitrytaline 100mg at bedtime. I wonder if Lyrica is worth a try or just try Cymbalta for now. I know the Trazadone I’m on now for the muscle relaxer is doing diddly squat, so that has got to go bye bye.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator author
    7 years ago

    Hi Melissa,
    You are correct, Lyrica and gabapentin are both antiseizure medications and understand your concerns about weight gain. Good luck with your appointment, let us know how it goes. If you’d like some information getting ready for the appointment with your neurologist I can provide you with that too! https://migraine.com/blog/6-tips-for-optimal-results-at-your-doctors-appointment/

  • Melisa71
    7 years ago

    I found this site not long after I had a migraine related stroke in February ’09. Since then I’ve been on an increasing dose of Topomax (currently maxed out at 200mg/day) to prevent migraine with Imitrex as a preventative. My neuro and ophthalmologist diagnosed my migraines as “complex”. I went back to work 3 months after my stroke, and did my own forms of physical therapy by just walking and doing every day activities. A little at a time my health got better, but some body parts seemed to be getting worse. I developed bursitis in my right shoulder, my left knee became weak even though the stroke affected the right side of my body, my hands don’t always work right…
    I lost my job in June’11 because I missed too much work due to my migraines and other health issues. Since then I haven’t been able to find another job. Alot of the problem due to the economy, or so I thought. The last denial letter I received stated that I was un-hirable because of my absence history.
    Since I’ve been out of work I’ve had sleep issues, either sleeping all of the time, or not being able to sleep, but still being exhausted either way. Odd pains, no energy…I finally saw my neurologist about refills for my meds and increasingly worse migraines, so asked him about the rest of my symptoms. He immediately said, “You have fibromyalgia.” THEN he checked my pressure points which about sent me through the roof. He prescribed Gabapentin and all it did was cause me excrutiating headaches so he took me off of it after 3 days, but hasn’t prescribed me anything else. I’m trying to stay on a regular sleep schedule, I eat fairly healthy and regularly, but have found that even a little exercise does me in for the day. I fall asleep at night quickly, but staying asleep is awful. I still wake up feeling like I haven’t slept and hurting. I don’t know what else I can do.

  • Melisa71
    7 years ago

    Thank you so much for the information. I have thought about seeing a headache specialist and/or a fibro specialist. My biggest issue at the moment is not having insurance and no income. I’ve re-applied for state healthcare for the third time and am hoping that I am accepted this time.
    I will be looking into Dr. Marcus’ book. I have another appointment with my neurologist Nov. 2nd, and am going to ask him about Cymbalta or Savella. My understanding is that Lyrica and Gabapentin are similar so I’m leary to try Lyrica. And quite frankly, I don’t need help to gain weight LOL
    I believe that everything happens for a reason, whether we understand why or not. I try not to complain or whine or ask ‘why me?’ I’m thankful that I found this site that I can come to for information and support 🙂 Thank you!

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator author
    7 years ago

    You poor thing, you’ve had an awful time. Sleep can be a real issue for those of us with fibromyalgia. You may want to take a look at the book Dr. Marcus wrote about it, we have some additional information on fibromyalgia in this link; http://migraine.com/blog/research-opportunity-aches-pains-fibromyalgia/. “The Woman’s Fibromyalgia Toolkit”(I’m not trying to sell it, I just thought it had some good ideas in it) might be something to look into. Have you given any thought about seeing a doctor who specializes in fibromyalgia or migraines? Cymbalta, Savella and Lyrica are medication that have been used to treat fibromyalgia and also treat migraine. Hang in there and let me know what you think about this information, ok?

  • daiseedeb
    7 years ago

    This is news to me that migraine and FM go together! I was diagnosed with FM in 1996 by a Rheumatologist. He subscribed a nightly muscle relaxer, and at that time Celebrex. We discovered that my asthma was contributing to the FM, as during the night I would have asthma attacks which would not allow my muscles to rest at night. I continue to take a muscle relaxer every night, but have switched to Ibuprofen..two in AM and two in PM. When I am a good girl and do my yoga, take my meds, and walk…it seems to help considerably. Due to fatigue, I have not kept the yoga up as much as I should.
    I have migraines as well. It is also related to when I don’t get enough sleep. They are visual migrains and if I don’t treat it immediately (two ibuprofen and a bunch of diet pepsi) I eventually will lose my ability to see. I write this so that it might help someone else as I have figured out how to deal with my issues for the most part.
    I wish everyone well, and hope for future improvements. ; )

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator author
    7 years ago

    Hi diaseedeb,

    Thanks for reading and sharing your experience with us.

  • Cass
    7 years ago

    My 13 yo daughter has been diagnosed with fm because the doctors in Nevada can not figure out what is wrong with my daughter. She lost her long term memory on 9/27/11. She suffers with severe migraines. We were told confusional migraines because she is unaware of her surroundings when she has her migraines. She is aphasic, and can not communicate with us. She also has chronic joint pains, chronic constipation, chronic ha, we have taken her to UCLA and that is where they diagnosed her with fm. She has the markers for RA but the number is not high enough for the doctor to diagnose her. Any information that any one can give us would be appreciated. It is hard as a parent to see my daughter go through this and the doctors keep saying that there is an underlying psychiatric issue. We now know that light especially flickering or flashing lights are her trigger. Exacerbates her migraine ten fold where we have to rush her to the hospital for DHE medication.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator author
    7 years ago

    Hi Cass,

    Thanks for reading. I’m sorry to hear about your daughter’s severe Migraines. “Confusional” Migraine is not really a diagnosis, but in her case more of a descriptive term. Aphasia is when “one loses the ability speak or understand speech, read or write, perform or understand mathematical tasks.” Take a look at Ellen’s article called Migraine symptoms: Transient Aphasia http://migraine.com/blog/migraine-symptoms-transient-aphasia/

    It sounds like your daughter has a lot going on with her health right now. Maybe the next step would be to see a rheumatologist. Another great article by Ellen to look at would be Triggers and Comorbidities, http://migraine.com/blog/triggers-and-comorbidities-autoimmune-disease/

    Good luck with your daughter and keep us in the loop!

  • Pepper
    7 years ago

    I have been living with migraine for as long as I can remember. I also have heart disease. I have not been diagnosed for Fibro but there are times when I have pain in places where there shouldn’t be any. Then there are times when the pain is in my joints. I always figured it was arthritis.

    I have found the moderate exercise relieves the intensity of my migraine attacks, however, it does nothing for the frequency of them. I still get around 10 attacks a month. I’m glad I found your site. Keep up the good work.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator author
    7 years ago

    Hi Pepper,

    I’m glad you found our site too and am pretty sure you will find lots of useful information here. Thanks for reading.
    Many of us have multiple health issues and exercise can be helpful. It can also trigger a Migraine for some others. I’ve also found that trigger identification and management can be very helpful in an overall Migraine plan.

  • Meljoenic
    7 years ago

    My son is 16 and has migraines,fibro and iBS.he doesn’t tolerate the meds well and has been trying to feel better naturally,with exercise and rest he feels Better in the summer but the winters trigger a flare up,it’s good that I found this site,I feel he is not alone.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator author
    7 years ago

    Hi Meljoenic,
    Thanks for reading. That is a tough road for a 16 year-old, he is absolutely not alone. Maybe reading some information here for himself might feel empowering to him.
    Caregiver support is also important. I’ve written a few posts on this, have you seen them? https://migraine.com/blog/living-with-migraine/tips-for-caregivers/

  • Myth1977
    7 years ago

    I was diagnosed with FM when I was 22, but was symptomatic quite a bit earlier. The slow progression gave me time to cope with the increase in severity and onset of different symptoms generally although it got a great deal worse when I was around 19. I was diagnosed but told I was ‘too young for drugs’ and that was that, so I just coped as best I could. Ironically I was getting migraines at a fairly young age as well but they were not diagnosed until quite a bit later… just sort of added to the massive amount of odd symptoms I had. Until one doctor asked specifics about those migraines and it was obvious they were migraines because of the nature of them and the pretty standard visual aura. By then the migraines were about three to six times a month, mostly hormonally triggered, but adequately handled by triptans. I rather blame the lack of FM treatment for the increase in migraine severity. But also when my migraines became frequent I was not on preventatives for a time either. Unfortunately when it became apparent they were necessary my migraines had made the leap from episodic to chronic. My FM was quite severe at the time as well. Very unpredicable flare ups, as well as severe IBS, nausea, horrible sleeping problems. As a result I was unable to continue my academic persuits and got a full time job… which is when I discovered how FM and lack of sleep can cause migraines to became daily. My doctor tried frantically to come up with a preventative and gave me a temporary rescue med but it has been downhill since then. I think the whole FM brain being wired for pain just made the migraines easier and they just compounded on each other, lasted days and I became more and more sensative to light and other triggers. The two conditions are so meshed together. About five years ago I was put on Lyrica as a migraine preventative, that might just help with FM… it did help with FM as it does with a certain percentage (does with my father as well). So I don’t get those severe flare ups any more, I have a lower base line pain, I can tolerate more exercise, walk farther, and when I do things the resulting pain does not last as long. Doesn’t do anything for all the other symptoms, of which some seem to just pop up over time, but it does help with the pain. Not the migraines though. The migraines are still completely out of control. In fact they are getting more neurologically weird with more intense episodes of migraine associated vertigo and prolonged auras. I have permanent nerve damage in my hand (peripheral neropathy) which is comorbid with FM, so I think it is that, but my neuro thinks it was caused by a long lasting status migraine. Whatever. It is all crazy in the brain at this point. I’ve been having issues with anxiety and depression these last two years; mostly associating with the attempt to cope with the pain and working full time and the fact it is impossible and yet apparently my doctors think it is achievable. So my main focus is emotional stability right now. FM is a complex syndrome and the research going on right now is fasinating, and long overdue… but I’ve never really had any doctors pay any attention to it and I think it severely complicates my migraines.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator author
    7 years ago

    Hi Myth, thanks for reading. Anything that helps reduce fibro flares is a good thing in my mind. Coping with the emotional difficulties of being chronically ill is another story.

  • dawnschell
    7 years ago

    I’ve had migraines all my life, and was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia at 19. It’s a hard life, with the constant pain. None of the approved fibro meds work for me.

    I don’t tolerate exercise well, and along with hypothyroidism, I am mostly a slug on the couch. I do try to walk, but no matter what I do, I have pain and weight gain.

    The migraines I can mostly kill with Zomig. The rest of the pain is something I generally just have to live with, and I take the occasional pain med or muscle relaxer to sleep or get relief.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator author
    7 years ago

    Thanks for reading, dawnschell. Fibro pain is the pitts. I am not a great fan of exercise either, but I’ve been walking – I can’t say I feel better though. Maybe a tad more energy- but certainly it has not diminished my pain.

    You may want to think about walking, starting very slowing at first and of course, check with your doctor to make sure it is ok to exercise.

  • sheilasmith
    7 years ago

    I have had migraines for over 20 years, and diagnosed fibro for 10. I have found that if I feel a fibro flare coming on, I can hold it down a bit with mild exercise (walking, swimming). It takes willpower, but it can keep a flare down to manageable level with minimal medication. As for migraines, even when I know one is coming (auras), I haven’t been able to prevent it from getting stronger without taking something like Zomig.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator author
    7 years ago

    Hi sheila,
    Thank you so much for reading. It’s great that you are able to fend off a flare some of the time with mild exercise. Do you by any chance know what some of your Migraine triggers are? Some of them we can avoid, some we can’t such as changes in the barometric weather pressure and hormones. Keeping a Migraine diary is very helpful. I found out lots of interesting things each time I’ve kept one!

  • sylmar444
    7 years ago

    I have had both migraines an Fibro for years with very little that helps. I just do a little and take a break an then do a litle more. I live in pain every day and have tried every med and even tried botox and nothing helped.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator author
    7 years ago

    Hi sylmar,
    Thanks for reading! Moderation is a must when dealing with any chronic illness. I’m not sure if you know, but there are over 100 different medications available to treat Migraine.
    http://migraine.com/migraine-treatment/prevention-medications/
    How many sessions of Botox did you have? Were you injected in all 31 recommended sites?

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