Migraine Hangover

Migraine Hangover

“Postdrome” is the official term for that wrung out, exhausted, headachy feeling migraineurs experience after the most painful and intense phase of their migraine attack has passed. Calling this stage, the fourth in a migraine attack, a “migraine hangover” strikes a chord the clinical definition does not. The most active, intense part of the experience is over and you’re left dealing with the not-quite-right aftermath. All without the fun of drinking delicious adult beverages and laughing with your friends.


Not every migraineur experiences postdrome, though most do. In one study, 68% of participants had migraine hangover symptoms that lasted from a few hours to a couple days, with an average duration of 25.2 hours. Symptoms include of tiredness, difficulty concentrating, weakness, dizziness, lightheadedness, decreased energy, head pain, skin and scalp sensitivity, and mood change.

I first wrote about postdrome in 2007 and have collected more than 250 accounts of migraineurs’ experiences with it. People describe the physical sensations as weighted down limbs, moving through mud, walking through quicksand, heaviness and numbness. Some say they feel like they’ve just run a marathon or been beaten up or hit by a truck. Though the pain isn’t as severe as in the height of the migraine, head pain is common and often exacerbated by coughing or sneezing, some say their head and brain feel bruised. Emotionally, people describe being easily agitated and annoyed, impatient, sad and depressed. A dense mental fog or haze, difficulty making decisions, mental confusion, and forgetfulness are also frequently reported symptoms.

Many migraineurs, both in studies and the stories I’ve collected, say that postdrome interferes with their work as well as their family and social relationships. Because the worst of the migraine is over, many feel like they should be able to get more done and feel guilty for not being productive. If you fall into this category — I certainly do — remember that the migraine is not over. You’re still experiencing symptoms, though not as intense, so try to go easy on yourself.

While knowing the medical terms used for migraine is helpful for talking with your doctor about your symptoms and experience, referring to a migraine hangover in social situations can help non-migraineurs understand the severity of the LEAST painful part of a migraine attack. Non-migraineurs think “hangover” and they think horrible headache and feeling wrung out. After I explained the similarities between alcohol and migraine hangovers to a friend, she asked, “You mean the migraine is even WORSE than that?” She was appropriately horrified when I said yes and that the hangover is actually a relief after the pain of the attack.1-3

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This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.
View References
1. Key Concepts of Migraine Postdrome: A Qualitative Study to Develop a Post-migraine Questionnaire. Headache. January 2011. Available at:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21198571 2. The Postdrome of the Acute Migraine Attack>. Cephalalgia. February 2006.Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16426278 3. Migraine Hangover (aka Postdrome). The Daily Headache. April 6, 2007.Available at: http://www.thedailyheadache.com/2007/04/migraine_hangov.html

Comments

View Comments (51)
  • Ayl88joanie
    6 months ago

    Previously I joked about the migraine hangover. Now I see others get it too. What a relief. Yes, I also feel I should be doing stuff but it’s impossible and I can’t make good decisions. I feel so guilty because my husband has to do so much more.

    Thank you for this article.

  • Mugsy
    9 months ago

    I describe it like wearing a heavy coat.

    There is a detachment from everything.
    I often think I’m fine but can say and email things that make little sense.
    The other interesting aspect is although I spend the day exhausted I don’t sleep very well that night.

    As a rule if I can stop the migraine I will prevent the postdrome. So I’m only usually caught out when the migraine strikes at night.

  • Elizaleona
    2 years ago

    I never thought I experienced postdrome with my migraines because the description just didn’t fit. I’m pretty sure I do, just not always and mildly (thankfully). The only symptom I experience is a sore head afterward, which I used to attribute to the aftermath of vomiting (before I knew about the postdrome part of a migraine).

  • zippy36
    4 years ago

    Thank you for this well written article. I copied it and sent it to my boyfriend via e-mail today. I had a terrible migraine yesterday and stayed home from work. Today, I feel tired and as though I just woke from bed. I can’t think or really comprehend. I am worn out. This guy has been with me 20 years and still doesn’t get it. He accused me of being on too much medicine. I took one Zofran at 4 p.m. That was it for the entire day. I used to think that this stage of migraine was from the after effect from taking the medicine the day before but since joining the site, I know it is postdrome. Thank you for giving me a place to go to feel understood and to feel “normal”.

  • Nicola
    4 years ago

    In the hangover stage right now and having to look after a sick child. Of course i don’t resent my child being ill – she can’t help it. We were supposed to go away on a much anticipated weekend by the coast but are stuck at home again. I find the worse the migraine, the longer the hangover. Usually need at least 2 days to recover. I want to scream and shout to make people understand but of course they can’t or don’t want to.

  • 100dollarheadache
    4 years ago

    hangover is always the way i explained it. i put it in those terms so others around me could understand how i felt. my post migraine hangovers linger for 1 to 2 days after the onset of migraine. its not a good condition. sound and light sensitive, head pain comes and goes. dizziness, fatigue and sun light is my enemy. i have slept 14 hours following a migraine attack. i throw up uncontrollably. the aura leads to the onset of sever pain, blurry vision, cold sweat, confusion, shaky legs then vomiting to the point of dehydration. it feels like i have been in a car wreck after a migraine. it is traumatic. then the hang over sets in. nausea, fatigued, tired and very dizzy and sensitive to my surroundings. i get 5 to 7 migraines a month. every migraine i say, that was the worst headache i ever had, because it feels like the worst migraine i ever had every time. i lose 15 to 18 days a month to migraine and recovery. i take precaution to avoid triggers, bright sun. even then i lose 1/2 my month. i have missed many life events due to migraine. my children do understand cause they see first hand how much suffering i take. relationships are different, my former girlfriend could not grasp how bad this really is. there were times i had to cancel visits and plans and she just did not understand even though i had migraines in her presence. she realized i could not control what was happening to me. it was one of the issues that led to our split. i am a single dad of 2. my kids go into migraine motion when an attack sets in on me. getting my needle or pills. they keep noise down and cook for themselves and pick up the slack. my daughter recently began driving and that has helped. there were times when i was sick and stuck in my car with the kids, for hours because i was the only one to drive. i have missed weddings, sporting events school plays and even doctor appointments to migraine. in all i feel bad for those who suffer more than me. i believe 1 migraine is too much to go through. i have a history of head trauma due to concussion. i am a former football player and i have had a couple of bad accidents with concussion. my doctor said my concussions are related to head trauma. i am paying the price well after the events.

  • tiphoenix
    5 years ago

    Thank you so much!
    I am 21 now and I have been having migraines since I was 7. As a child, I never understood what was happening. Even the word headache was a nightmare for me,it still is. And since no one else had it, I was often told that I was being lazy.
    Only a migraineur understands the point behind hiding in a dark room, behind the curtains. I feel nauseous,irritated, get sensitive to light and noise, have mood swings, lose all my energy and concentration even before and after the attack. The attack is so bad that even after taking my medications the pain never goes away completely. The pain is so unbearable at times that I have to constantly remind myself I won’t die from a migraine. I feel so drained of life even after the attack. It feels like my head just ran a thousand miles!
    The postdrome lasts a day or two. When I finally think it’s over, there’s a next attack on my way.
    It just helps so much to know that I am not alone.

  • MahtaMouse
    5 years ago

    For years I thought I was just being “lazy” because of the exhaustion I felt after a migraine. Describing it as a hangover is the perfect description. For me, a migraine hangover can last anywhere from a full 24-72hrs, depending on the severity of the migraine. During this phase, I want to do is sleep; but if I sleep too much, then it triggers a headache which if left untreated, slides into another migraine. Right now because I’ve been waking up for the past several weeks with an “on the cusp” morning migraine… baaad headaches teetering on the brink of a full blown migraine… I’ve been suffering from extreme exhaustion with an easily ignored low grade headache. I hate this feeling. I keep the lights off, I don’t want to go anywhere, do anything, talk with anyone or even get dressed. Sometimes I don’t even want to eat for a full day. Being able to finally give what I’m feeling a name and description that people can actually relate to is great. It’s also a relief to know that I’m not “lazy” or a hypochondriac or alone.

  • Gemini
    5 years ago

    I have noticed a significant change since I have had 3 or 4 acupuncture treatments. I have had no migraines in over a month whereas I previously had up to 4 a month. I have had only two headaches, both milder than a migraine and I got rid of them by taking aspirin and having a nap. I am still keeping the Imitrex tablets on hand, jic migraine symptoms return.

  • sufferer since 1972
    5 years ago

    Having read your article, I’m feeling extremely relieved with the knowledge that I’m not the only one who has “migraine hanovers”. I’ve actually referred to them as such for several years, or I say, “now I’m in the stage of getting over “getting over” a migraine. During this stage, I generally feel “washed out” for at least several hours, if not a day. And for those who can’t understand what it means to have a migraine….they assume that once the migraine is gone, that you should be back to a state of full functionality. I think that the term “hangover” can help them to relate to how you feel.

  • Tracey A
    5 years ago

    I sent a text to my mom and sister today about my migraine hangover. I had a 3 day migraine and now the lovely hangover. I am starving, the back of my head is sensitive to the touch, dizzy, nauseous and too tired to talk out loud. I usually can sleep like crazy but am having difficulties sleeping this time. I was supposed to spend the day with my niece but knowing I would be recouping today I pushed it back. As unpleasant as it is, at least I know my body is on the mend. It makes total sense after the pain wreaks havoc on our bodies!

  • Lisa J
    5 years ago

    Ah thank you for this!
    I often use the term migraine hangover and feel terribly guilty about not getting on with more and being a depressed blubbering mess!

  • kischrjo
    5 years ago

    I can relate to so many things in this forum. I always referred to it as “fog” but most people dont understand just like another post had mentioned. That includes doctors, and yes the ER is the worst. In so many ways we are forced to isolate ourselves regardless of the phase.
    It is only this past 3 to 5 yrs my migraines became most severe, and as of 1 yr ago I could no longer work. It has been a steady increase for about 10 yrs. I fought the good fight, working since I was 15 yrs old. This year the guilt just about pushed me over the edge, but I am learning to live day by day and take the good days as a true blessing. I am lucky as my husband tries very hard to accommodate our lives around my illness and my children are all in their 20’s. I thank God for this forum. Before i found it, I was certain I was alone and possibly crazy. However, reading the different stories, no matter what the subject I read my life over and over and have realized how many of “us” there are. Sometimes it is shocking how little is done for this brave group of sufferer’s.
    For me, the only thing I can do during the “aftermath” of a migraine is rest, rehydrate, try to eat, and use cold compresses and heating pads for head pain and body aches. Sometimes a little caffeine and if you have the means a massage can help tremendously but I cant afford to do this very often. (Hint to your loved ones for gifts to get a massage) thank you to all who take the time to share as I think we learn so much from each other and it is sadly comforting we are not alone. God Bless to all.
    Kischrjo

  • MajorPain
    5 years ago

    For me it depends of the severity of the migraine attack. If I am coming out of a bad one, it could take up to 24 hours to feel normal again, I just feel totally exhausted and sleepy. Sometimes I sleep 12 or 14 hours like a log and still I awake feeling tired and I ached all over not just my head. A hangover is a good definition: light , sound and smells are amplified. I also have nausea and dizziness. I don’t know about irritability , I just feel too down to feel anything other than life is not worth living…I am talking when I have a migraine hangover. When I am having a bad migraine, the kind that nothing works to take away the pain, I just wish a was dead.

  • Janet
    5 years ago

    I agree with you 100%….it’s frustrating and lonely…and nobody gets it except others like us. I lost my closest friend and fellow migraineur to suicide 1-1/2 yrs ago. She would have been 50 last month. Her husband had divorced her because he couldn’t stand her migraines anymore. That’s the sad thing…those we care about the most we alienate. I pray for all of us.

    Blessings
    Janet

  • MajorPain
    5 years ago

    Sorry for the misspellings and the horrible grammar, I am having a migraine today, it does affect my speech and it seems it does affect my writing skills too, so sorry, I hope you are able to understand what I try to say. I did not realize it until I have post it and read it a couple of times, the mind is a funny thing.

  • MajorPain
    5 years ago

    For me it depends of the severity of the migraine attack. If I am coming out of a bad one, it could take up 24 hours to feel normal again, I just feel totally exhausted, sleepy, sometime I sleep 12 or 14 hours like a log and still I awake feeling tired and ached all over not just my head, and hangover is a good definition: light , sound and smells are like amplified, nausea, dizziness. I don’t know about irritability , I just feel to down to feel anything other than life is not worth living…I am talking when I have a migraine hangover. When I am having a bad migraine, the one that nothing works to take away the pain I just wish a was death.

  • Mary C
    6 years ago

    For years and years, I’ve always likened “postdromes” to someone who has just risen from the dead. Light and sound still hurt, and all I can do is shuffle around like a zombie. ugh.

  • Angela Harris
    6 years ago

    I hate my postdromes. I completely identify with the “hit by truck” description or I can feel like every joint in my body burns/aches like the flu or sometimes, I get so sleepy that I just can’t keep my eyes open almost no matter how hard I try – those are the worst, especially when I’m at work. Really, the best thing for everyone is if I can just fall into bed and sleep it off.

    And the worst thing of all is if the postdrome drags on too long because then it almost becomes its own trigger, and I can start chaining attacks for two or three or more days.

  • Daisy
    6 years ago

    Has anyone found anything helpful that takes the migraine hangover away or shortens it? I saw the hamburger suggestion, I usually crave ice cream.

  • scouterwife
    12 months ago

    I saw an article a few years ago about magnesium for migraines and muscle twitching, which I have both. It talked specifically about the hangover, it said the studies were for 500 to 600 mg a day to prevent it. I started taking it after 2 more hangovers, have not had a hangover since. It also stopped an annoying muscle twitching in my left eyelid. I can tell when I have forgotten to take the magnesium as the twitch comes back.

  • Ariel Pond
    6 years ago

    This is such a good thing for you to share. After extensive dental work, I suffered the worst migraine I’ve had all year. The next two days it was so hard to function. For three days I got sick, was dizzy, depressed, and foggy. No medication I had taken had worked. I had had new symptoms with this migraine, so I went to the hospital. They didn’t seem to understand the danger in new migraine symptoms, that migraines can cause strokes if they are bad enough. The pain was off the scale. They told me my problem was minor and it would be upward of 4 hours to even get triaged. I went home and suffered. I’m still suffering. Third day of postdrome and all I want to do is sleep.

  • MajorPain
    5 years ago

    I hate to go to the ER for migraine, the doctors do not seems to know anything about migraine in the forts place. They treat you like either you are a malingering drug user in search of the next fix, or if your show symtons they are not use to , (like half my face will drop) they think you are having a stroke no matter what you tell then and order super expensive test while you still wait in pain. I have been send home with aspirin after hours in the hospital, but them been charge 5000 in medical bills.

  • Joy Jensen
    6 years ago

    Call your dentist to fill them in.
    Then take someone with you to the hospital who hss seen you in previous attacks & this one.

  • marydickey
    6 years ago

    Glad to know I’m not crazy. I thought it was just me too, having spent numerous days in nothing short of a stupor after having been so sick for 12-24 hours, and I mean throwing up and dry heaves and just absolute exhaustion. And that’s when the meds (maxalt mlt or Zomig nasal spray plus the Zofran dissolving pill that’s supposed to curb the nausea) DON’T work. Which is about half the time actually. So then I feel all of what’s been described here and the brain fog, unable to form sentences, etc., etc….

    I honestly have felt like I was the only one who had this. But I don’t hear of that many who suffer from the horrible nausea and sickness as I have. Maybe it is just me??

    I have found there is a very narrow window of opportunity when I wake up with this to catch it in time so I don’t get sick and when it does it’s usually fine but when it doesn’t forget it… 🙁 Nothing found on the CT scan or MRI here either, and the doctors seem to think I should be relieved to not have some sort of tumour or something but they don’t understand that I’m just extremely frustrated to not be able to find a cause. I’ve checked out something called “cyclic vomiting syndrome” which I’ve learned can be accompanied by migraine or not. Anyone else familiar with this? There is even a society for that, which I guess people can join to get support.Any feedback or insight would be very welcome. Thanks for reading. 🙂

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    6 years ago

    Hi marydickey,

    You aren’t alone, many people with migraine experience awful nausea and vomiting. Diana has written an article about this you can read here; http://migraine.com/blog/migraine-gastroparesis-nausea-vomiting-and-diarrhea/.

    It is a relief that your CT and/or MRI’s are negative, but I do understand how frustrating migraine disease is. While we don’t actually know the exact cause of migraine, we do know it is a neurological genetic disease that when triggered by outside stimuli (like certain foods, smells, hormones, weather changes and many other things)an attack may occur.

    Have you kept a migraine journal recently? This is a great way to identify migraine triggers and see if there are any patterns to our migraines. There are many apps available and Migraine.com has the Migraine Meter you may be interesting in looking into; https://migraine.com/migraine-meter/.

    We have information on cyclic vomiting syndrome or CVS
    in this article; http://migraine.com/migraine-types/abdominal-migraine/ and the Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Association has a website you can see here; http://cvsaonline.org/.

    Nancy

  • Denym167
    6 years ago

    I have used the term migraine hangover for a long time because it feels exactly like a hangover: I feel like I am in a fog and just not connected to people around me. The worst the migraine the worse the hangover…I have found dehydration is part of it and will keep Gatoraide near by. It helps not only with the dehydration but the lost nutrients and salt that get depleted during an attack.
    Recently I suffered a silent migraine that turned me into a total zombie…the hangover was the welcome part cause I knew the migraine was over…thank you for the blog, I felt alone calling it a migraine hangover. Although I would not wish this on any one.

  • mbclink
    6 years ago

    What you detailed is what I go through each time I have a migraine. One thing that always occurs for me is that I get really hungry for hamburgers. I don’t understand why, I’ve just learned to go with it. I usually wake up with the migraine, it lasts the majority of the day, the “hangover” sets in, then I start craving hamburgers. The next day I feel better, but still in the “hangover”phase. It usually takes me a couple of days before I’m back on par. Reading this does make me feel somewhat better knowing I’m not being lazy after the migraine.

  • Beti
    2 years ago

    I ALWAYS get a craving for hamburgers! So does my dad who also suffers from Migraine Disorder. I wonder if it has to do with the fact that when we get migraine attacks, our blood vessels apparently swell so more blood is rushing to our brains, hence the pounding sensation. Maybe when our blood vessels go back to normal and the blood flow decreases, our brains think we’re not getting enough iron or something, so we crave red meat. This is based on zero science, so I’m sure it’s not accurate, but it’s my own untested theory. It doesn’t explain why we crave hamburgers over steak, however, so I’m not sure. I met another migraine sufferer once who had the same craving too, so it’s definitely not just us!

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    6 years ago

    Hi clink,

    During postdrome our emotions can run the gamut, from depressed to euphoric. I haven’t experienced euphoria, but have indeed been depressed, exhausted and very emotional during postdrome.

    Hang in there 🙂

  • Denym167
    6 years ago

    I also crave the hamburger, fries and recently obsessed with smoothies(banana and strawberry). I always thought it was just me…

  • mbclink
    6 years ago

    Matt, it’s not just you. I am glad to see there are others who have that same craving. My wife is like yours in that she’ll ask me if I want a burger when I have a migraine. Have you heard of anyone else having the same craving as we do?

  • coygroup
    6 years ago

    I have been describing my “day after” as a migraine hangover for some time, and do feel that it helps non-sufferers better understand at least a little of what we go through. Clink, I thought I must be the only one who craves hamburgers! Actually, my wife knows to call before she comes home from work when I’m having a migraine to ask it I “need” one. It’s that predictable!

  • mbclink
    6 years ago

    One other thing I nearly forgot to mention as I’m going through the “hangover” now. I constantly feel like I’m about to break down into a crying fit for no reason, even now I want to start crying and it’s all I can do not to cry.

  • Tim Banish
    6 years ago

    Kerrie-

    Great story, and very true. I have “migraine hangovers” with almost every side effect you mention. The most common for me are the foggy head, forgetfulness, and the walking through mud feeling. I usually can’t eat for hours after a migraine, then have to force myself to eat something.

  • marlenerossman
    6 years ago

    My postdromes are as bad as the migraines. And they last an entire day. I am so sick from the postdrome that I cannot eat. I am losing weight and I do not want to. I hydrate, take Advil and try to rest, but nothing makes the postdrome better. So, in addition to excruciating migraine usually in the early AM, I spend the rest of the day suffering postdrome.
    Hangover is putting it mildly.

  • Janet
    6 years ago

    Ugh!!!do you think I’d proof my post…..still migraining….postdrome for sure…can’t type what I think I am thinking

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    6 years ago

    No worries, Janet. We knew what you meant!

    🙂

  • Janet
    6 years ago

    Kerrie
    I’m experiencing that prodrome right now…and you’re exactly right…I am beating myself up because I’m not productive, arguing with my husband and depressed that I’m losing more days to migraine

  • Ashley
    6 years ago

    My migraine hangovers typically last about a week. I seem to have pre and post migraine hangovers. I feel bad for a couple of days leading up to it, then it lasts 3-4 days, then the hangover could drag it out to 8-10 days. It makes for a rough month. Then the second it is over, I start dreading the next attack….. it’s a vicious cycle and I wish more people understood it. When someone says “oh, you have a headache” I get so upset! It is not JUST a headache people!!

  • Janet
    6 years ago

    It’s a difficult battle…and most non-migraineurs don’t get it and won’t. And if they do it’s short lived…..my husband knows, but forgets I migraine everyday…he forgets me up walking and talking means nothing…except that I’m trying not to lose another day if its at all possible…the mistake I make as I can fake sometimes so well he can’t tell…but who wants to be around us when we are at our worst day after day…we have no choice and they get burned out….ugh….we just pray for a better tomorrow …
    Blessings
    Janet

  • Ann61
    6 years ago

    That’s exactly what it feels like!! A hangover, but without the party… Makes me feels so sad and useless and normally it lasts until the next migraine starts….

  • Diane Fox
    6 years ago

    Thanks for your blog about postdrome Kerrie. It is a word I am not familiar with but I am familiar with all of the symptoms. I’m so relieved to know that I am not the only person with these migraine hangovers. I usually need to rest or take a nap during these periods. I’m happy to know I’m not just a lazy you know what.

  • Dori Fritzinger
    6 years ago

    Keep up the hard work Kerrie! Living with illness is hard when so many people do not understand how migraines work and that they are different for each person.

    I was not aware the “postdrom” symptoms can also be the signs of a rebound migraine coming – there are no words to explain the pain of a rebound migraine!!

  • jkrudolf
    6 years ago

    I’ve been reading with great interest all of the postings!

    I am wondering if anyone else has problems following verbal instructions/directions i.e., processing verbal information-it may be during the post dome phase?

    I went to a neurologist a couple years back when I was really having trouble with memory/cognition-couldn’t seem to ‘track’ what she was asking me to do. When she asked me to perform simple tasks (like hold arms out, palms up-I would hold arms out straight but couldn’t figure out why she said I wasn’t doing it right). She went so fast-and seemed agitated when I ‘wouldn’t do’ what she was asking me to do. I left in tears! I went to her asking for help but I was so embarrassed when I ‘failed’ and she ‘could find nothing wrong with me’. I’ve had migraines for about 10 years…..now have a wonderful neurologist and finally have some moderate success with medication. Still have symptoms-just not as severe. But during that phase I had trouble with face recognition, using wrong names (but close approximations) for simple objects, etc. Thankfully, that stage seems to have passed-or is being controlled better now.

    Does this sound familiar to any other migraineurs?

  • Newdancerco
    5 years ago

    I getyelled at by my mother for slurrimg and mumbling on the phone- it sure sounds like this!

  • Denym167
    6 years ago

    Wow…I also forget words, common, basic words. It’s like I am drunk, which I’not. I can always tell when a migraine is coming because my speech becomes (I am actually in the middle of a hangover and can’t think)…I think this is the worst part cause people who don’t get migraines really don’t understand this side of a “headache”. Glad to know I am not alone in this fuzzy thinking and slurred (that’s the word!)speech (I am really not making this up, I really could not think of the word “slurred”).
    Thank you for your views , I don’t feel so alone.

  • barryolliver
    6 years ago

    I don’t think many people (including headache specialists) understand postdromes. It seems that postdromes can be just as variable as migraines can be. Not only do I feel completely drained and washed out for a day or two after a migraine, and the rest of the world seems to be running at twice normal speed, I find it difficult to string comprehensible sentences together and also find it difficult to understand others unless they speak slowly and in short sentences. Frankly, at such times I prefer to avoid anyone who has more language skills than a small child. Animals and pre-preschoolers are fine for company. Anything else is just too exhausting.

  • Janet
    6 years ago

    All too familiar. It’s really embarrassing at church when I say nice to meet you and the response is we met last week. This isn’t an isolated occurrence…this is my life. Suffering from migraines for over 37 years…the last 13 chronic….it’s frustrating…and depressing. I don’t know what it feels like to awake in the morning and feel good…or close to not so bad. I have adjusted my life to the fact that I probably won’t have those days again. I’ve been drugged to the ax and at present am on no preventatives because I think I’ve had them all…and ones like it…my abortives are my saving grace…and when I can no longer use those for days…I’m really in a bad place. I’m glad you have a new doc who is helping. I’m one of those people who get any and all side effects to meds and even ones I’ve had in the past…when reintroduced they don’t work or cause a more severe migraine…if that is even possible…I won’t say I’ve given up…just redirected my focus and pray a lot. God has shown His mercy and grace and after just relocating to the Atlanta area from Las Vegas …have met some really great people at church who know people just like me…so for me…a miracle to have new friends already understand why I wear us glasses all the time and leave in the middle of a gathering with no questions asked…just kind words…

    Blessings
    Janet

  • janenez
    6 years ago

    I have exactly the same problem. Sadly, it has slowly gotten worse over time, about 8 years now. It used to be only during a migraine – especially the postdrome. ( I thought it was a side effect of triptans). Then I noticed the symptoms creeping in more often – even when I was between migraines. No doctor has been able to explain it. Nothing shows up on CT or MRI scans. If you get any answers I’d love to hear about them. It has cost me speaking engagements, giving confident directions in my teaching stints and sounding like a reasonable person in a staff meeting. Someone recently asked me if I’d had a stroke.

  • Dori Fritzinger
    6 years ago

    Like you have been living as a fairy on my shoulder when I have post-migraine symptoms. I too have been sent to tears when unable to get words clear or understand simple directions by hospital staff.

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