Migraine Pet Peeve: The Word Cure
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Everyone wants there to be a cure for migraine. Unfortunately, some people who are not educated about migraine disease or who are pedaling products to desperate migraineurs will try to lead you to believe there is one. There isn’t.

Don’t get me wrong: We can do so very much to manage our migraine disease. We have access to a great category of medications called triptans and medications for nausea, sleep and pain. We can manage how we relate to our migraine disease using alternative and complementary therapies, such as cold therapy, meditation, yoga, acupuncture, physical therapy, psychotherapy and so many other options.

My issue is when people build an entire business around the idea of targeting people who are suffering and so desperate they will do or try almost anything if there is even a remote chance it will help alleviate their migraines. I know I’ve been there, and I’m certain many of you reading this have been, too. It’s not just people manufacturing supplements who are pedaling this lie. There is even a book available on Amazon.com called The Migraine Cure.

As a migraineur myself and an advocate for other migraineurs, I feel protective of you guys. People trying to prey on my community fires up the mama bear in me and makes me incredibly angry.

So what’s the takeaway here? Be discerning in what you choose to believe, buy and try as treatments for migraine disease. Here are my recommendations:

  • Steer clear of anything or anyone using the term cure with respect to migraine. It’s a huge red flag.
  • Perhaps even more importantly, if a doctor or other health care provider ever suggests he/she can cure your migraines with a treatment or surgery, run, don’t walk, out of that office and don’t go back. Headache disorders specialists, heck, even well trained doctors, know there is no cure for migraine (yet) and would never suggest there is one.
  • Never buy a product, such as a supplement, that says it can cure your migraines. They are preying on your desperation to make money, plain and simple. If they were interested in actually helping migraine patients they would be more educated about the disease than to suggest there is a cure.
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