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Migraine and weather

Migraine Triggers: The Power of Weather

Migraine and weatherWeather and barometric changes can be an underestimated, yet powerful trigger for many Migraineurs. Just how powerful is the weather’s effect on our bodies? I wanted to take a minute out and talk about that. My story is one that includes a particular passion of mine: horses.

I live on a farm. I used to manage and operate one of the area’s larger horse breeding facilities and I have helped horses give birth many, many times over many years.

In the horse world, most breeds consider a horse’s birthday to be January 1 of each year, no matter what day the horse was actually born, even if that day was December 31. Because the majority of equine activities rely at least partly on the age of the horse – yearlings compete with yearlings, two year olds with two year olds etc –  it is important that a foal (baby horse) is born as close to, or after its *birthday* of January 1 as possible. The later in the year the foal is born, the less mature it will be when it competes against others in its age group, putting him/her at a disadvantage. This means breeders will often plan for their foals to be born during times where weather and accompanying barometric pressure changes, can be highly variable from day to day.

As a breeding manager, we loved it when the weather changed, especially if a good storm was coming in.

Why?

Because we knew our foals would likely be born.

You see serious horse breeders attend the birth of their foals to be sure they are born healthy and that there are no problems. Birth for a horse is miraculous, but also fairly violent in nature. It happens in mere minutes and usually in the middle of the night in private, and if something goes wrong seconds can be the difference between a life and death situation. Additionally, horses are large, powerful animals. Getting one out of trouble can be scary and dangerous for the horse and the attendant.

So where does the weather part come into play?

Mares (mother horses) frequently foal (give birth) during or right after storms. The bigger the storm or the greater the change in weather, the more chance your mare will give birth. For centuries breeders have noticed that the changes that come with an alteration in the weather frequently drive horses to foal, and for centuries we have used these changes to plan our days (and nights) on “foal watch.”

An example: At our farm there are 8 mares scheduled to foal within the next 2 1/2 weeks or so. When a storm came through this weekend, 6 of the mares foaled. One was a little earlier than she should have been.

We don’t entirely understand why these changes trigger the birth of a foal. Is it barometric pressure, or positive ions or something else? That doesn’t change the fact that it works. We can use this knowledge to help us plan and hopefully avert bad situations.

How do we know if weather is one of our Migraine triggers?

Keeping a Migraine journal can be one of the most helpful things you can do to discover predictable triggers like weather, or barometric pressure changes. Migraine.com offers a journal tool to help you keep track of your attacks and gives you places to record information that may be helpful in discovering a weather related trigger.

Some patients are very easily notice weather as a trigger, while other patients (like me) are much more difficult.

In my case, we were sure I had no weather related triggers. We kept a journal and included a recording of the weather that day and the day before and after, thinking that would cover my bases. Nothing matched up, so we moved on looking for other triggers.

In reality, it took years to figure out that I DID have weather related triggers, but I am actually extremely sensitive to them, so it is the pressure changes that we keep track of more than the actual weather itself. Another clue to my weather triggers was learning that air travel frequently triggered Migraine attacks for me. When you fly by air, you are exposed to pressure change triggers that can clue you in to your weather related triggers, and vice versa.

What can I do if I have a weather related trigger?

The good part of a weather trigger, is that it is often one of the easier triggers to predict.

The bad part is that it is nearly impossible to prevent unless you’re open to relocation.

You can plan ahead if you know you have these triggers, and sometimes you can do things that can prevent the attack before it hits you. Here are some examples:

  • One of the first and best things to do is to take care to minimize all your other triggers as soon as you know a front is coming through. Triggers are cumulative, so keeping them minimized is important. This is often inconvenient and difficult, but also helpful.
  • Some physicians have found that asking their patients to watch the pressure changes and weather carefully, and carrying their abortive with them to take at the first sign of a Migraine attack is helpful.
  • Other doctors have tried using a long-acting triptan like Frova when a major change (or air flight) is going to happen, and for some patients this can be helpful in avoiding the attack. Care should be taken that it is not taken too frequently though. Not only is it expensive, it can cause Medication Overuse Headache aka rebound.
  • Other physicians prescribe a medication called Diamox (acetazolamide) for their patients with pressure or weather related triggers. This medicine is also used in non-Migraineurs to help prevent altitude sickness, and is important in the treatment of another headache disorder called Intracranial Hypertension. The medicine can be taken long term, or just when the trigger is imminent. As with any other medicine, there is no guarantee it will work for anyone, and the medicine isn’t going to be an option for everyone. It might be worth talking to your doctor about though if you find these triggers are a serious problem for you.
  • I have heard of a couple of patients who found that taking magnesium helped them with their weather triggers. Not only do they supplement daily with it, but will add additional magnesium, or soak in Epsom salts or indulge in magnesium oil massages if they find out a weather front or barometric pressure change is coming, continuing until it has passed and the weather has once again stabilized.
  • Some who concentrate on the body’s lymph system will tell patients that massage alone followed by increasing water intake for 24 hrs, concentrating on increasing the body’s ability to circulate and eliminate lymph (your body’s trash system) can be helpful to prevent a weather related trigger. I have no experience trying this, but it requires no prescription and at the very least may aid in relaxation.
  • For many with weather related triggers who live in areas where there are frequent changes triggering their attacks, the best option is often starting on a long term preventive regimen. A consistent regimen may be helpful, but it must be continued even when weather triggers aren’t a problem. Here the operative word really is consistency.

For me, I’ve found an unconventional way to treat my weather related problems. In my case, a muscle relaxant called Flexeril (cyclobenzaprine) is sometimes helpful when I feel stiffness coming on related to pressure changes and the joint pain I experience as a result of them. Muscle spasms and stiffness are a Migraine trigger for me, and getting ahead of the game before they have triggered my attack has saved me on many occasions.

Do you have weather related triggers? Do you have any tips or tricks to share with other patients with these triggers? Have you tried any of the methods I’ve mentioned above? Let’s talk weather!

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • Lilg310
    3 years ago

    My son has been struggling with Migraines since he was 3, he now is 10. Over the years I have discovered all of his triggers relating to food. His biggest trigger is Barometric Pressure and it usually increases during the months of December- March. Keeping a healthy diet is key during this time and maintains sugar levels. However, it is a struggle during these months because in PA the weather changes are so frequently.

  • M2the4
    4 years ago

    I watch the barometric pressure and usually get a migraine when I fly. I also have used Flexeril to help with the shoulder muscles that feel like rock. But I have to be careful with it as it makes me very sleepy. My husband says I am better then the weather forecasts in predicting a storm coming! I get Botox shots every 12 weeks and # have reduced significantly but still get them. Ice packs on the forehead and warm pack on the neck and shoulders help. To break a 2 week cycle of migraines I had my scalp frozen for 5 hours. It broke the cycle.

  • Linda K.
    5 years ago

    Thank you for this article and for all the comments. It’s good to know we are not alone. Weather CHANGES do it for me, especially barometric pressure changes, either way. A head neurologist at a hospital told me that CHANGE was the operative word. My worst migraine ever came at the time of Hurricane Katrina. I live in Indiana, far, far away, but I have always believed that somehow the dramatic pressure changes there were felt by me, hundreds of miles away! And yes, I can predict the weather. I monitor the pressure changes on a good weather site on the Internet.Not a whole lot I can do about it, but these ideas you mention are interesting.

  • Pamela
    5 years ago

    I also contend with barometric migraines…among others. Earlier this week, I finally got to see a neurologist for the first time in my life. She diagnosed me with intractable complicated migraines. She explained that the auras I was experiencing were actually arterial spasms and warned me that these had the potential to become strokes. She placed me on Topomax and Cambia, as triptans were not safe for my type of migraine. Right now, I have 3 different approaches depending on my circumstances: Cambia for migraine with aura, Maxalt for migraine without aura (Maxalt is not safe for my type of aura), and Sudafed for my barometric migraines. I tried the Sudafed PE Pain & Pressure and was pleased to find it effective. I take Topomax in addition to Nifedipine to reduce frequency of attacks. I’ve been taking B2 and Magnesium (among other supplements) for several months now and they have also made a positive difference.

  • Anne
    5 years ago

    Thank you so much for this article!!!! Weather has always been my biggest trigger. In fact, my very first migraine at age 12 was during a thunderstorm. When the weather jumps 10 degrees warmer in a day, I know that a migraine is coming. If a thunderstorm’s approaching, I know I will get migraine with aura. For me, it’s the pressure as well. It took a long time to convince my doctors that this was the case, but they are coming around.

    I’ll bet if I lived in ye olden days, I would be some sort of weather witch, because I always know when a drastic change in the weather is coming. 🙂

  • Cat Travis
    5 years ago

    I have learned that a large percentage of my migraines are weather related. I have tried CoQ10, had it work for a little while. I am taking magnesium, extra D3, and recently started Feverfew to try and alleviate the headaches, along with my rescue medication and my twice-daily topomax. The migraines started after an accident I had as a young child, and have progressively gotten worse over the years. I have tried all the known triggers and ruled most of them out. I watched my blood pressure for more than a year and noticed that when I had a migraine, my blood pressure dropped quite low. But what I have noticed more than anything is generally 2 to 3 days before any drastic change in the weather, that’s when I get hit with a migraine. The severity of the headache is tied to the severity of the weather change. Something new in the last few years has been the aura… I’ve always had the ringing in my ears, but not like what I’ve experienced in the last two years. This time, however, whichever ear starts ringing loudly and more painfully than the other is always the side I get the migraine on a day or two later. I did read an article about the connection and showed it to my DR, he was surprised to say the least, but didn’t rule out the possibility. The weather really does wreak havoc on us, and when you add Fibro, and RSD to the migraines, I get a triple whammie every time there is a change in the barometer!

  • Tracey A
    5 years ago

    Thanks for the article! I’m going to need to try the magnesium. When I have a weather related migraine no medication will help ease the pain. I don’t know the exact weather patterns that trigger for me as some storms I don’t get migraines and others if know a front is moving in or the temp will be changing without looking at the weather. People think I’m crazy 🙂 I’m definitely going to try magnesium and extra water next time! Thanks again!

  • TracyM09
    5 years ago

    My Migraine response to weather fronts is severe! Low fronts really wipe me out. I have been taking preventative medications for 13 years. So I guess my next step would be to try Frova, I think I used it once a few years ago but the Imitrex
    worked better. I never considered taking it before the front came in! Given that my preventatives don’t seem to be preventing anything the Frova might be a good try. My warnings for Migraines have changed, my nose runs…only the left side, I get a buzzing in my arms and hands which makes me quite fumbly!! My menstrual cycle stopped in Nov 11, I had thought hurray…now I just endure and fake being ok the best I can.

  • Cindi
    5 years ago

    From the beginning, several decades ago, I knew my migraines changes with the winds! I lived in Hurricane Alley for a long while, so I know the drill now for the rest of my life. I’ve found that staying away from all other possible triggers is helpful, even triggers that don’t normally bother me like cheese. But there is no stopping it, only managing it, once it is on. Botox has helped me by reducing the intensity, for which I am thankful. But the nausea, light sensitivy, dizziness, etc… all that remains. The work that you and Teri and others do in political circles and as patient advocates helps SO MUCH… I’ll think and pray for your new foals and for you as I take my meds tonight in readiness for tomorrow’s next wave! Hugs, Cindi

  • Foxii
    7 years ago

    This is so spot on! Years ago I told my physician that weather is my MAIN trigger. I will get a migraine 1 day to 1/2 a day before a snow storm and be crying in the corning until the blizzard is 1/2 over. I’m better these days, but its still bad. I was told at one time that weather isn’t considered a migraine trigger, so reading this was awesome.

    I currently use Flexeril as part of my regime because I have found too that as I tense up it makes them worse and then it’s a cycle that’s difficult to break. I also like Midrin which has the muscle relaxer…if taken right it works great. I can’t do triptans because I’m nursing, but I will certainly find out about some of the other ideas in here!

    I have trouble going home because of my migraines, I can count on a headache 1/2 way accross the Mackinaw bridge 100% of the time. I also have issues with flying. Plane going up OK….but plane coming down is horrible. The longer the flight, the worse it is too! 🙁 Not good!

  • Pamela
    5 years ago

    My neurologist wishes I could take Midrin, as it’s perfect for my type of migraine, but Midrin doesn’t faze me at all. It’s like taking a placebo. I can’t take triptans because they further increase my risk of stroke due to the type of auras I have.

    In my case, I can pick up on a low pressure system several days in advance. It could be clear and sunny outside with the forecast showing stormy weather 5 days away, and I’ll be nauseous with pain until the storm finally arrives.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    7 years ago

    I understand patricia. You could try some of the other meds mentioned for travel, some people find they really help.

  • Holly G.
    7 years ago

    Over the past few months, I’ve come to realize how powerfully storms affect my migraines and I’m at a point in my life where relocating isn’t out of the question. I do live in MI where “if you don’t like the weather, stick around 5 minutes and it’ll change” but I was always under the impression that most everywhere is like that. Is it? Where is the ideal place to live without migraine-inducing-weather? (Google wasn’t any help whatsoever.)

  • Ellen Schnakenberg author
    6 years ago

    Good luck barbaraschwartz – I am wishing you all good things!

  • barbaraschwartz
    6 years ago

    I have heard from both my neurologist and a frequent migraine-suffering friend that Arizona (at sea level) is the best place to live to avoid weather-related migraines. I’m so ready! I love NJ but to be headache free would be wonderful!

  • Foxii
    7 years ago

    I am a Michigander too! So sorry. I used to live in the UP and it was worse up there!!! I also lived in Germany for a while. I think the best was AZ…but I wasn’t there during many weather fluxes…

    This year has been really odd to with my migraine seasons coming at different months due to the strange weather patters.

    I work 1.5 hours from one of the houses and a migraine can come and go 3 or 4 times before I get to my destination. Talk about making a gal crazy!

  • kimmysaurus
    7 years ago

    I’ve been getting migraines for about 15 years now, and have gone through/outgrown (not sure if it’s really outgrowing or my body just changing) a few sets of triggers. One that has NOT gone away (and has probably gotten worse over time) is weather and pressure changes. I almost always get migraines where there are pressure changes in either direction, and it’s not fun. I’ve also been blessed with auras (lucky me!) and I tend to have the auras pop up like little lightning bolts about 5 or 10 minutes before a migraine comes on. I see a lot of different aura patterns, but I always know what’s coming with HOW they pop up and how I feel physically. The aura is a little helpful sometimes, since I know if I can get some ibuprofen or acetaminophen into my system as soon as possible after it starts, the migraine will be a bit more bearable. I’ve tried preventive meds like Topamax, border on the chronic migraine category so triptans and other prescription drugs are not a viable option for me, can’t use Excedrin Migraine or generic forms of it anymore (the caffeine makes me WAY too hyper these days), can’t take other prescription pain meds because of the codeine component. I’ve seen a big-time neurologist, had all kinds of medical tests to make sure there was nothing physical contributing to my migraines. Last treatment solution the neurologist arrived at was Botox, but it’s too cost-prohibitive for me to consider it. (believe me, if I had the money, I would go for it!) My question to everyone is, has anyone tried and had success with “alternative” treatments like acupuncture or chiropractors? I’m starting to think I may try this route and see if any of that helps, or consider exploring options to make Botox possible. Has anyone tried that either? (or opinions on it)

  • Suzie
    4 years ago

    Kimmysaurus. I have been having acupuncture for about 3 or 4 years now and, whilst it doesn’t prevent migraines, it has had a huge impact on the intensity of pain I get with them. I do get lots of the other usual symptoms with it still though (dizziness, nausea, numbness, sensitivity to light smell and sound, inability to concentrate and exhaustion), but it’s a big relief that the pain levels aren’t like they used to be. I live in England and I’m very fortunate that I have a doctor who does the acupuncture for me free under the National Health Service. The National Health Service won’t pay for any services unless there is substantial evidence that they work. I would thoroughly recommend acupuncture but make sure you use someone good with all the right training. Good luck with it.

  • Ellen Schnakenberg author
    7 years ago

    kimmysaurus – I don’t know if this might be of help to you, but we have a page on assistance and coupons for Botox here http://migraine.com/offer-center/migraine-prescription-drug-coupons/botox/

    There are fortunately lots of folks who see improvement with alternative and complementary therapies. We have pages of discussion on our forum about them http://migraine.com/forums/ as well as topic pages like this one with lots of links here http://migraine.com/complimentary-and-alternative-therapies/

  • Rex
    7 years ago

    …so for those not in the know…. do you have a barometer and read your own pressure? or get it from the internet/site in your area. I don’t remember my highschool weather class AT ALL 🙂 I looked around a little online, but wanted to get some suggestions from people with migraine who DO keep track of the pressures themselves “how to”

  • Ellen Schnakenberg author
    7 years ago

    Rex, honestly I just watch the weather and look for changes. Changes in either direction can spell trouble for me. Barometers are easy and cheap to get and can be helpful for some too.

  • Garangwyn
    7 years ago

    This is a great story. I’ve had barometric-pressure-related headaches for as long as I can remember…in fact, I had them before I knew I had migraines. One of the ways I know it is a weather-related migraine is that NOTHING helps with the pain…it won’t go away until the external conditions that are triggering it let up. It’s also strange because for me, it’s unpredictable. I don’t necessarily get a migraine with every weather change. But I have tracked them long enough to know there is a definite likelihood that I will. All of the suggestions you made, Ellen, are very much appreciated. I would love to be able to indulge in the massage but with my current disability income, that’s out of the question. But since I have Fibromyalgia as well, the tension issue is one for me to watch for. And the magnesium supplements are certainly something to try. Thanks so much for this article! (I love the horse story…I think it’s fascinating about them foaling during storms!)

  • Ellen Schnakenberg author
    7 years ago

    jenniferbrodeur, I so hope you are able to find something there that may be helpful for you. Do keep in touch and let us know!

  • sueinperu@roadrunner.com
    7 years ago

    about 12 yrs ago I noticed my dizzy spells seemed to coincide with the weather. I contacted the local weather lady and told her i thought my spells might have to do with the highs and lows. We started emailing everyday for 2 weeks and every time there was an extreme high or extreme low i had a dizzy spell for the day or so. But It doesn’t coincide with the migraines though. Thanks for the great article!! 🙂

  • Ellen Schnakenberg author
    7 years ago

    It’s true that weather can influence us in so many ways. Heart disease, arthritis, all kinds of illnesses can be better managed when the weather is taken into consideration.

  • maytearchilla
    7 years ago

    Thankyou so much for this wonderful article. I get horrible migraines as a result of wheather changes as well. I live in Arizona and we get monsoons about 4 months every summer. From June through September, every afternoon. So it really is bad for me. I’m going to talk to my doctor about the medications you have mentioned and maybe one of them will help even a little. Thanks for writing these articles. It’s nice to know there are many of us with the same problems and we are not alone.

  • Ellen Schnakenberg author
    7 years ago

    I will keep fingers and toes crossed for you that you can try some of these tricks and meds and that you find some success with them. I hope you keep in touch and let us know about your experience!

  • jillmcdowell
    7 years ago

    Great article! I learned some very interesting facts about horses here. It was interesting to me that they give birth with bad weather. I’ve always heard that hurricanes can usually trigger giving birth in humans as well. 🙂
    I too suffer from weather related migraines. I’ve often called myself a human barometer! Last night we had a very rough lightning storm pass through our area. My husband and I were out visiting a friend when this headache from Hades slowly started creeping up on me and then hits me full on right before the sky opens up and lets it all hang out!!! To make matters worse I had not eaten in SEVERAL hours and I was having to drive on the interstate through the downpour with lightning all around being passed by 18 wheelers that were NOT slowing down and cars that WERE slowing down. I’m so thankful no one wrecked. Needless to say it took a muscle relaxer, a Treximet, my Alabama ballcap nice and tight on my head, and an extremely dark, quiet room in order to recover. I did indeed wake up with a hangover headache but it was nothing compared to the MONSTER that I was dealing with last night.
    Starting today I will make more effort to minimize my triggers, at least the ones that I able to.

  • Ellen Schnakenberg author
    7 years ago

    Hang in there jillmcdowell! If you’ve found that you have this trigger, you’re already ahead of most other folks…

  • Elaine Gross
    7 years ago

    Thank you Ellen. Excellent article as usual. Very interesting about the horses, I really enjoyed it. I’m going to ask my neuro about the Flexeril when I see him in a few weeks. I get such knots in my back that are very painful and massages seem to only provide temporary relief. We have been so dry here on the East Coast and need rain pretty badly, but at the same time I dread it because I know I’m in for a miserable time. Oh well! The rain in certainly more important.

  • Ellen Schnakenberg author
    7 years ago

    Elaine Gross, there are a lot of different muscle relaxants that might be helpful for Migraineurs, so if one doesn’t work, don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater. Sometimes giving different meds a try will finally yield something helpful 🙂

  • elizabethglenn
    7 years ago

    Ellen, thanks for an interesting and informative article. I usually have more migraines when it storms but really need to watch how I feel before the weather starts to change. I live in SC and the weather is so hot right now. We also have late, popup storms in the afternoon. I am seeing a new neurologist this week so this info will help. I also learned about the birth of horses which was interesting also! I live near Aiken, SC and they have a large horse community.

  • Ellen Schnakenberg author
    7 years ago

    I hope you get a chance to discuss weather triggers with your new doctor. Keeping fingers crossed you have a good experience and have found a “keeper”!

  • moneypenni
    7 years ago

    Thanks for the validation. I can predict the weather better than the Weather Channel, between my head and my knees, and even though I’m in Ohio I can tell you when a hurricane is forming, or worse hits land. No one believes me, but even little barometric changes are beyond painful for me…if I thought it would help I’d move to the Arctic that seems to the one place I haven’t tried out to avoid weather changes.

  • Ellen Schnakenberg author
    7 years ago

    Many people have found they can relate, but discovered it through keeping a Migraine journal like this one: http://migraine.com/migraine-meter/ . How did you figure your connection out??

  • javiersotomayor
    7 years ago

    Hi Ellen. It’s the 1st time I comment on this site, but I wanted to say it’s the first time I’ve read others have weather triggers like me. I’ve been telling family and friends that if I would have been born in a Native American community, I could’ve been their witch-weather-man. I live in Miami and during summer we experience a storm almost every afternoon after extremely high temps all throughout the morning hours, and I can tell which days it’s not happening, since I feel great that day. I have not bought myself a barometer but have considered it, although I think I can predict the storm before they say it on the news. ;-( It is only one of my triggers, and I also try to control other triggers to minimize the effects of weather related ones, like you said. I’m glad I found this website – just downloaded the Migraine app for Android… let’s see how I can use it to be better. Blessings to you and all the readers here.

  • Ellen Schnakenberg author
    7 years ago

    Hello javiersotomayor – Thanks for the comment! It’s great to see new folks engaging, and even better when they are having some success with managing their Migraines as it seems you have 🙂 I think it helps all of us to hear positive things as it gives us not only ideas to try ourselves, but also hope that if we keep trying, someday we’ll stumble on something that may be helpful. Hope you have luck with the App too!

  • jaijai01
    7 years ago

    Thank you!! Approaching cold fronts trigger massive attacks for me, yet when I’ve explained this to my doctors, every one of them has told me there is no relationship between weather changes and my migraines. Thank you for validating what I’ve felt is true.

  • Ellen Schnakenberg author
    7 years ago

    jaijai01 I wish I could say your situation is unique. In fact, I suffered similarly for a long time. It still took us a long time to put the puzzle pieces together because there are so many triggers and things that can at first glance seem totally unrelated… including the weather. There is still some controversy among the medical community re: weather triggers. My opinion is that this is the case mostly because we don’t know specifically how it works. Sometimes physicians don’t believe anything until they see the tested, written, peer reviewed proof before them… that is how they’ve been trained.

  • Writermom
    7 years ago

    Zanaflex is a miracle drug (muscle relaxer) which completely removed, prevented my migraines. Unfortunately, I became allergic to it. I have tried Flexeril, and had some problems with it, but not allergy. I stopped it, and will try it again later this week. Muscle relaxer seems to be the way to go, in addition to the other meds. Weather is a BIG trigger for me! Thanks for this article. I haven’t read any other which mentioned weather and what to do about it.

  • Ellen Schnakenberg author
    7 years ago

    Writermom, glad it was helpful for you. I’ll be writing more about weather triggers periodically, as it does come up fairly frequently.

    Glad the Zanagflex is helping you. Have you been evaluated for postural problems or cervicogenic headache by chance??

  • carladul
    7 years ago

    for me its the hot, bright blue shies, sunshine with no cloud cover. Not really sure if its the extrere heat or light or both. On days where its super hot and sunny (or even mostly so) bout the only thing I have found to help me is to stay inside WITH my sunglasses on and cool washcloths on my neck and face. Doesnt always work but it helps more than most things I’ve tried for weather related migraines.

  • Ellen Schnakenberg author
    7 years ago

    Glad you both are finding ways of dealing with your weather triggers. Please do remember however that “all natural” doesn’t mean side effect free. In fact Peppermint oil and Feverfew can both be dangerous if used in someone taking other specific medicines, if you’re allergic to other plants, or if you’re pregnant. Remember always to check with your physician first before going and trying something like this on your own. Better to be safe than sorry…

  • lisanappier
    7 years ago

    I can feel a low pressure front coming a full 2 days ahead of the storms, almost to hour. It starts out feeling like there’s an elephant sitting on my head, then moves to my just behind my left temple, and takes over my head from there…I’ve actually just stopped taking propranalol as a preventative. I did help the migraines in severity, but I got HORRIBLE nightmares every night from it. That’s the last of the preventatives for me to try. I have noticed that watching my other triggers in general helps, but the only thing that has ever taken them away completely was Mona Vie. It’s one of those “super juices” I absolutely loved it, but it came to the point where I couldn’t afford it. I do, however, highly recommend it…I’ll be trying Feverfew today, and I’ve heard that it works really well when taken with Butterbur. I’m not sure of dosage, but I’m going to give it a try.

  • Ellen Schnakenberg author
    7 years ago

    lisanappier – please take care with supplements, as they have the same powerful affects on our bodies as pharmaceuticals. Feverfew is one that comes with several contraindications and some severe side effects. We usually remind patients that they should never change their medications in any way without talking to their doctors, just to be on the safe side. 🙂

  • diloretta
    7 years ago

    For me, warm fronts are bad. High pressure (I always know when the sky is totally blue) is bad. Weather coming from the wrong direction is excrutiating – Nor’easters and Atlantic hurricanes. I can feel a hurricane 2,000 miles away, easy.

    Peppermint oil on my temples, hot bath, neck massage, sometimes Xanax as a muscle relaxant. And I have just started using Feverfew which works remarkably well for me.

  • Ellen Schnakenberg author
    7 years ago

    Great list of things to do when a weather related problem crops up – thank you 🙂

    Peppermint oil is one of those we need to be careful with (there are medical contraindications, and it needs to be in a carrier oil for safety) so for others wanting to try it, please talk to your doctor about it first.

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