Precision-Tinted Lenses Help Reduce Migraine-Related Visual Disturbances

According to a small study, episodic migraineurs who were fitted with a special type of glasses called precision ophthalmic tinted lenses experienced a reduction in visual disturbances often associated with migraine with aura.

Researchers fitted 11 migraineurs and 11 non-migraineurs with three different types of lenses: the precision-tinted lenses, grey lenses and control color lenses. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine cortical spreading depression and low pass spatial frequency tuning they showed the research subjects both specific visual stimuli known to trigger migraine attacks and non-triggering patterns.

The brains of migraineurs wearing gray or control color lenses and exposed to the triggering striped patterns were triggered in ways believed to be related to development of migraine attacks. Both when they were exposed to stressful and non-stressful patterns the discomfort of migraineurs wearing the precision-tinted lenses was significantly reduced. In past studies 42% of patients wearing precision-tinted lenses experienced a reduction in migraine attacks. Considering the new information and what we already know, it is reasonable to conclude we could lower the trigger threshold of migraineurs whose attacks are triggered by visual disturbances by fitting them with precision-tinted lenses.

Two of the theories right now about what happens in the brain when a migraine attack is triggered are related to cortical spreading depression and low pass spatial frequency tuning (particularly regarding visual disturbances). Researchers found that both of these factors were impacted by research subjects wearing the precision-tinted lenses. The precision-tinted lenses ability to normalize of these two factors provides evidence of the neurological impact of these lenses.

Patient Advocate Ellen recently wrote an article for Migraine.com with information about tinted lenses for migraine prevention: What color of eyewear is best for light sensitivity?. If you think this might be a good option for you I encourage you to review that article and meet with an eye doctor who might be able to help you obtain them.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.
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