Recommendations for Those with Chronic Migraine

Probably the most difficult time of my life was the period when my Migraines were chronic. Migraines are considered chronic when you have a Migraine 15 or more days a month. Essentially, you have a Migraine more often than not. Chronic Migraines make it difficult to carry on with your life, and they make it difficult to stay positive and keep working toward a better treatment regimen.

It took time, perseverance, and more patience than I ever thought I could muster to get through that period of time, but I did get through it.

Here are some recommendations I’d like to offer to those with chronic Migraine:

  • Don’t give up

    Many of my recommendations will come back to this one. For most of us, if we give up, it’s over. Our families and friends can’t know how we’re feeling, make doctor’s appointments for us, and do the work for us. Neither can our doctors. It’s up to us to keep fighting and working with our doctors as treatment partners as we look for effective Migraine management. Nobody can do that for us.

  • Work with the right doctor

    A recent report from the World Health Organization revealed that most doctors get four hours of education about Migraine and other headache disorders while in medical school. Neurologists get an average of 10 hours. That means that many of us with chronic Migraine need an actual Migraine specialist, and we need to remember that neurologists aren’t necessarily Migraine specialists, and Migraine specialists aren’t necessarily neurologists. If you’ve been working with a Migraine specialist or another doctor who really understands Migraine for a reasonable period of time without making progress, there’s nothing wrong with consulting another specialist for a second opinion. No doctor is the right one for every patient. For more on this, see Migraine Management Essential 1: Diagnosis and Doctors.

  • Don’t stop trying to identify triggers

    It can be difficult to identify triggers when Migraines are chronic or daily, but it’s still worth it. If you find that some of your triggers are avoidable, you may be able to reduce the number of Migraines you have. For more information on triggers and identifying them, see Migraine Management Essential 3: Trigger ID & Management.

  • Be an active treatment partner

    Nobody knows our bodies like we do. I was recently at a conference where the statement was made that during a doctor’s visit, there are two experts in the room. The doctor is a medical expert, and the patient is an expert on their body. We can’t be passive about our treatment; we must be active participants. Chronic Migraines can wear us down, but we have to stay involved in our care and treatment. We need to actively discuss our options with our doctors so that they’re making decisions WITH us, not FOR us.

  • Continue your Migraine diary or journal

    It’s important to record when we have a Migraine, what the trigger may have been, what medications we took for it, our pain and disability levels, and other information. Diaries can reveal patterns and other information that can be helpful in refining our Migraine management regimen.

  • Continue learning about your Migraines

    Knowledge is empowering. Understanding our Migraines (and any other health issues we have) helps us work better with our doctors. We can’t call our doctors every time we have a Migraine. We have to make some treatment decisions, such as when to take what medications, ourselves. To make good decisions, it’s important to understand our Migraines. And, here’s a bonus — Studies have shown that patients who are educated about their conditions have better treatment outcomes.

  • Try new treatments with a positive attitude

    In psychology, there’s a principle called “self-fulfilling prophecy,” which essentially means that if we enter a situation thinking it’s going to go a certain way, it most likely will. It’s an excellent demonstration of the power of our minds, and it can apply to our treatments. For example, if we focus on the potential side effects of a medication we’re going to try, certain that we’re going to have those side effects, we most likely will. Our minds will produce the side effects even if the medication doesn’t. Certainly, we should be aware of the potential side effects and negative impacts of any treatment we’re going to try, but we need to remember that they’re potential, not certain, and maintain a positive attitude.

  • Ask your doctor to rule out idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), aka pseudotumor cerebri, is a disorder caused by poor absorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), resulting in high CFS pressure. It can trigger Migraines, so if your Migraines are frequent, and you can’t identify your triggers, it’s worth asking your doctor to rule out IIH. It’s important to know that the only way to definitively rule out or diagnose IIH is with a lumbar puncture (spinal tap). Some people with IIH will show papilledema (swelling of the optic nerves), but not all do.

  • Don’t hesitate to ask questions

    When you see your doctor or another member of your health care team, ask any questions you may have about Migraines, your treatment, or related issues. That’s part of the service you or your insurance company are paying for. If your doctor doesn’t like answering questions, it’s time for a new doctor.

  • Don’t give up

    Yes, it all comes back to this one. If your doctor isn’t able to help you, find a new doctor. When trying a new preventive medication, remember that it can take up to three months to know if it’s going to help, so don’t give up on it too soon. If several preventive medications haven’t worked, don’t give up hope. There are now over 100 medications in use for Migraine prevention, making it pretty much impossible to have tried everything. It would take more than 25 years to give each of those medications a fair trial.

Migraine is a disease. That’s something we have to remember. Like diabetes, asthma, and other diseases, Migraine disease can be difficult to manage. It can be done though. Remember that you’re not alone. Find other Migraineurs to talk with for support. Keep learning. Find a good doctor who really understands Migraine disease and how to treat it. Be proactive. There are many ways we can work with our doctors and gain control over this disease.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.
View References
World Health Organization, Lifting the Burden. “Atlas of Headache Disorders and Resources in the World 2011.” Geneva. World Health Organization. May, 2011.

Comments

View Comments (61)
  • CathyC
    6 years ago

    I truly believe I was lead to this article this morning as I too live with chronic migraines. At my last appt with my neurologist he increased my 50mg Nortriptyline to 60mg daily for 30 days and then 75mg after that. My migraines every so often decide to go out of whack. We believe they just have out smarted the medication, as there is no other logical reason. So on top of my brain and body being worn out from all the migraines, it’s an increase in milligrams for them to get accustomed to. I’m trying to not make this sound like I’m complaining, because I’m not a complainer…total opposite. I know there is always HOPE ! I have a post it note next to me with a quote “We can live without a lot of things, but HOPE isn’t one of them. Remind yourself daily. Place your hand over your heart and say aloud “HOPE LIVES HERE”. I do, yet today I was really depressed, so reading your article reminded me that this is a disease I have and I sometimes you need to get it off your chest. It helps you feel better too.

  • body
    7 years ago

    I love this article, Teri. As a fellow chronic migraine sufferer who came close to giving up and with the help of a great western medical doctor, my husband, and a doctor of traditional chinese medicine got off the volume of triptans I was taking, learned to identify and manage my triggers and along with regular treatments of acupuncture, daily practice of meditation and other relaxation and energy techniques have a new life. For my fellow sufferers, I would say as well, “Do not give up!” There is hope.

  • Nereida Odessa
    7 years ago

    I am in a moment with pain every day, I changed doctors, have two times in hospital, put me the same tretment, now iam trying to find a doctor in Geneva I live in frontalier of france and geneva, is dificult to buy triptans her, I go to spain to buy but works few hours and begin to pain again, I take topiramato that the neurologist prascribe but not woking, and they say to me for not take triptans like I am a drug, but I take because pain a lot and sometimes I few I am going to die, now is every day, I want change for one doctor who care me more, I sow the people healph doing sports and working I cry and stay depresing. weel if somebody nows somebody nice in Geneve or France tell me. kisses and healph.

  • Cindi Moyer
    7 years ago

    Good stuff Teri, as always. I will admit that over the years, I’ve come very close to giving it up, but have mustered myself back together to begin again. As you say, no one can do it for us, really. My newest adventure is the nerve block shots… and now my work is starting to get cranky about my absenteeism so I’m feeling pressured to find an answer quick so I can move back out of this chronic phase. I know many here understand…

  • Teri Robert
    7 years ago

    Oops, Cindi. Spelled your name wrong. Sorry!

  • Teri Robert
    7 years ago

    Thanks, Cindy. I know there are times when you feel like giving up. Been there myself. If you ever find yourself feeling that way and needing an extra shoulder, come find me, please. OK? We just can’t give up and let this stupid disease win. That’s not an option. Sending you a hug!

  • Kathi Lorber Bleen
    7 years ago

    Having spent 8 years in almost constant agony (notice I said “spent”) I can’t agree more with Teri and how important it is to not give up. All Teri’sr points are on target and it is important to know there aren’t always answers, but as I found out, you don’t always have to find one. Sometimes it finds you. I traveled the country trying to find someone who could help me, to no avail, but eventually the migraines became less intense, as well as less often. Drugs were ineffective for me as prevention, but zomig nasal spray is a godsend. Sometimes I found just straight aspirin to do what morphine could not. Regardless, DON’T EVER GIVE UP.

  • Monika Rich
    7 years ago

    Thanks Catherine I will check it out, when I came across these sites I was just happy to see I’m not alone and that so many going thru the same thing as Iam thou I don’t wish the pain on anybody…..it just gets so frustrating when People hear that you have a Headache and all you have to do is take a Pill and it will go away and sometimes even Dr’s look at you and don’t understand why certain treatments don’t work with you.

  • Catherine Charrett-Dykes
    7 years ago

    i’ve heard that story a thousand times, been there myself too….you will find some compassionate people and maybe learn somethings too…..you are not alone!!!…and it isn’t all in your head!!

  • Monika Rich
    7 years ago

    I have been living with Migranes since I been a little Girl and I have seen so many Dr’s and tried so many different med’s, to many to count.But somehow I managed to live my Life and raise a Family, but that changed in the last few years.My life has practical come to a standstill because of my daily Migranes.No matter what kind of meds I take or shots , even with a change in Diet , nothing has helped.They just seem to get worse each day and I just feel like there is nothing out there that can help and I sometimes I even get the feeling my Drs don’t know what to do anymore.Anybody going thru the same and what are you doing for it?

  • Catherine Charrett-Dykes
    7 years ago

    hi monika…i don’t want to keep reposting the same thing…they might think i’m spamming or something…..but i have a fb page for chronic sufferers called chronic migraine awareness …i have an experimental version of a neuro stimulator…..scroll up to another’s comment for the link…..i’m happy to answer any questions……i have been as frustrated as you are about my treatment

  • Lori Hyde Dollar
    7 years ago

    I have had migraines for 27years now. The last few months I have had 3 a week and having to get pain shots at my doctor’s office on a reggular basis because I am allergic to imitrex and many other meds for migraines and can not take alot of meds because I have only 1 kidny functioning due to high blood pressure from migraines. I have been on disability since 2000.I have been to many doctors over the years but none of them have been able to help me. I just hope some day there will be a cure for migraines.

  • Debbie Jones Mobbs
    7 years ago

    Sorry to hear you are still having such pain with migraines. As someone who has suffered from migraines and am now pretty much free of them, I can only say I hope they can find something to help you like they did me. I went for months, a few years back, with migraines 5 out of every 7 days. I am so thankful I am better, and I will pray for God to help you through. God bless!!!

  • Lori Hyde Dollar
    7 years ago

    No Tammy I have not tried accupuncture I think it is only thing I have not tried I may have to think about that. I hope all of you are well let’s get together soon. Tell James and the kids hello for me. Love Ya’ll Lori Hyde Dollar

  • Tami N Todd Smith
    7 years ago

    Lori so sorry you have to go thru that. We took our daughter to our prim. care dr, to neurologist and finally to accupuncture. The accupuncture helped her. She still gets them from time to time but majority of time now she can feel when she’s about to have one and takes some med. before it actually becomes the full blown migraine. I hope this helps you if you’ve not tried accupuncture before.

  • Catherine Charrett-Dykes
    7 years ago

    http://www.facebook.com/ChronicMigrainAwareness this is my public group offering support and awareness to those that just don’t understand our pain…..Teri Robert is right, you can never give up….we need to be heard so drs and people understand the level of our pain and suffering……being proactive will get the medical community to realize that we need more solutions to treat this horrible disease.

  • Karen Klein Crow
    7 years ago

    This group has helped me to reach out to others who are chronic like I am, in a way that I can’t in other groups that I am also part of. I love all of the support, and what all of the “advocates” are doing to help promote ALL types of migraines, as well as helping us to find solutions that work for us. THANK YOU.

  • Catherine Charrett-Dykes
    7 years ago

    Steph Moreno andAndrea Thomas Krohn, thanks so much!!!….just trying to do my part and help people out, no one should have to suffer alone

  • Andrea Thomas Krohn
    7 years ago

    It is a great, supportive group.

  • Steph Moreno
    7 years ago

    and it is a WONDERFUL WONDERFUL group! Love ya Cat!!

  • Cheryl Leach
    7 years ago

    Has anyone tried detox for chronic migraines? quit chocolate, caffeine and all pain meds?

  • Leticia Amado
    7 years ago

    I suffer from Migraines, but now I’m noticing that my jaw hurts and I have pressure behind my eyes, nothing is working I’m in so much pain, does anyone suffer from jaw pain when you get migraines?

  • cancan
    6 years ago

    Have you been checked for TMJ? My dentist made me a mouth guard I wear when I sleep,it does help.

  • Catherine Charrett-Dykes
    7 years ago

    i’ve had my neuro add botox injections into my jaw for tmj….you might find that helpful

  • Carlo Luciano
    7 years ago

    Hi swthrt. I have organic meds ..I’ll bring them 2 u when u get back

  • Leticia Amado
    7 years ago

    Thank you so much for this link, it helps to know that I’m just not imagining this pain. I’m going on day 4 now with this pain. Thank you so much for responding.

  • Teri Robert
    7 years ago

    Leticia, this is something to definitely mention to your doctor to get more help with it. The trigeminal nerve becomes inflamed during a Migraine, and that can cause the kind of pain you’re talking about as well as facial and eye pain. I found this easier to grasp once I saw an illustration of where the branches of the trigeminal nerve lie. Want to take a look? You can see it at http://www.helpforheadaches.com/lwfiles/illus-pathways.htm

  • Kim Martin
    7 years ago

    Hi Teri – So I took your advice & I had a lumbar puncture to rule out IIH. I’ve had migraines for 20+ years, with them being chronic for approximately half that time. The opening pressure was normal (12), but I was just told that the CSF total protein was below normal. The normal range is 15 – 45 & mine was 12. It seems that the primary reason for low total csf protein is overproduction of csf, perhaps due to csf leak, which can be caused by IIH. However, the opening pressure was normal. The only thing my doctor said was that there could have been an error in the reading of the opening pressure. Do you know if it’s possible to have normal opening pressure, yet still have a csf leak? I can’t seem to find much info on the subject. Any help is greatly appreciated.- Kim

  • Barbara Richards
    7 years ago

    Thanks for the encourging words Terri moved to a different state trying to find new doctors it is so fustrating neuro said I can see the brain damage you need to see someone else M.D. says try skelaxin and pamelor after I told him that a 1/4 tab of ellivell will make me sleep for over 24 hrs stright………..

  • Catherine Charrett-Dykes
    7 years ago

    i agree w/Teri…just because he is a neuro doesn’t mean he is a headache specialist…….don’t be afraid to find a dr that you feel comfy with

  • Teri Robert
    7 years ago

    Barbara, you’re very welcome, always. Are you seeing a Migraine specialist rather than a general neurologist? Let us know if we can help you with anything.

  • Marilyn Berger Kanes
    7 years ago

    Have any of you tried the detox/hospitalization route?

  • Phyllis Dawson
    7 years ago

    I have tried so many medicines such as topmax & was taking max amount.I’ve tried savella, pamelor the list goes on.I think they are getting better then its like starting all over again.I’ve been to specialist.Nothings seems to work/.

  • Danielle Turney
    8 years ago

    I would like to say that those who suffer migraines, sometimes exceed the chronic migraine requirements that are listed in the chronic migraine overview. In 2 years and 10 months I missed over 150 days of work, I had migraines that lasted for months and I have had more then 1 type of migraine occur during an attack. During my migraines I can have pain on either side of my head or across my forehead and then get an ocular miraine on top of everything else. These migraines started at age 16; I still have them and they only get worse over the years. No prescription medications help with relief any longer, my only relief is my Botox injections. I get them every 3 months, the last round only lasted 1 1/2 months.

  • Catherine Charrett-Dykes
    7 years ago

    http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=188260647944201, this is my story and my treatment other than botox this has been the best treatment so far, and what is great about it is that it doesn’t effect your liver like some meds do …i’m happy to answer any questions about it ….i’ve suffered since i was 13 and had pain that was off the charts, 10 wasn’t a high enough number for me…….now i’m a daily 6/7, adding pain meds i can sometimes get better than that….don’t give up!!!!!

  • Teri Robert
    8 years ago

    Daniell, absolutely people exceed the “requirements” as stated in the overview. It’s 15 or more days a month to be classified as chronic. That means 15 is the minimum for that classification. Definitely, it can be more frequent. At one point, I was having 20 – 24 Migraines per month. I know what you mean!

  • Teri-Robert author
    8 years ago

    TechGal02,

    Thank you, and you’re welcome. I’m sorry your Migraine are giving you so much trouble. If you need help finding a specialist, let me know, and keep me posted on how you’re doing. OK?

    Teri

  • 8 years ago

    This was very helpful, thank you. I actually came to this site today because I have another chronic migraine and I’m not able to take triptans (I’m allergic to it, go figure!), I’ve noticed the majority of my chronic migraines get triggered in the morning and sometimes after work, the other day I ended up getting one at work but i suffered through it till I got home. Hopefully I can learn more from this site on how to control my migraines, its almost daily now that I get them (the chronic ones, once-twice a month), once my health insurance kicks in I’m gonna go try to find a good doctor that specializes in migraines, so hopefully they will be able to help too! Have a good day, and hopefully a migraine free day!

  • Debra Jaliman
    8 years ago

    I’ve had migraines for 20 years. But now over the past 5 years I have them daily. I have been to many top headache specialists. Now on 300 mgs topamax. Nothing seems to help.

  • Catherine Charrett-Dykes
    7 years ago

    http://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=188260647944201, this is my story and my treatment other than botox this has been the best treatment so far, and what is great about it is that it doesn’t effect your liver like some meds do …i’m happy to answer any questions about it ….i’ve suffered since i was 13 and had pain that was off the charts, 10 wasn’t a high enough number for me…….now i’m a daily 6/7, adding pain meds i can sometimes get better than that….don’t give up!!!!! …i cheated and just copied and pasted but i’m still as willing to help 🙂

  • Jon Gabney
    8 years ago

    Darn, you’re good Teri! Don’t know how you think of all of these things, but I’m grateful you do. Thanks.

  • Catherine Charrett-Dykes
    7 years ago

    Teri Robert has done so many great things for us…..bringing up this topic for instance!!!..not many people realize that they can get help and that there is support out there for fellow sufferers…..we can’t get through this alone, we need a people around us that understand

  • Aleshia Davenport
    8 years ago

    I wake up with migraine I don’t know what trigger them is cool air or sinus or what but they last for days. I need relief from them. Sometimes looking out the door trigger them I’m taking otc meds till I find a Dr.

  • Catherine Charrett-Dykes
    7 years ago

    i find that the change n air pressure is my biggest trigger…watch the news/weather forecast…..keep an eye on the high and low pressure systems switching places, moving around…..that being said, not much you can do about it but you might have an answer ….hope that helps some

  • Jennifer Stewart
    7 years ago

    Jon Gabney 99% of my migraines arrive in the nighttime somewhere along the line. I almost always sleep well, so it’s more than lack of sleep for me, at any rate.

  • Jon Gabney
    8 years ago

    Aleshia, when I wake up with a migraine it’s usually because I didn’t sleep well or didn’t get enough sleep.

  • Laura E. Phillips
    8 years ago

    My migraines began with menopause at age 40 in 2004. The attacks have varied in frequency over the years from a couple of times a month to a couple of times a week. In the spring of 2010 the frequency began to increase. By the spring of this year they had become daily occurrences despite trying a long list of medications, both rescue and preventative.

    With new prescriptions I may get some relief initially, but it just seems to be the result of placebo effect or wishful thinking. For example I recently tried two separate rounds of DHE injections every 8 hours for several days to break my daily migraine cycle. In both cases, after the first 3 injections I started to feel better. How sweet the relief despite the pain of the shots and the diarrhea. But then after a day or two the migraine returned. Prior to that, at first Imitrex helped me about 70% of the time but then dropped to less than 40% of the time. Topomax didn’t work. Verapimil didn’t work. etc. etc. I’m careful about eating regularly and my sleep routine. I’ve kept the migraine diary, but with daily headaches, nothing or everything could be the trigger.

    Over the years I have seen internists, an ENT, 3 neurologists, a gynecologist, a psychologist for biofeedback, an opthamologist and an endocrinologist. I currently see a neurologist who has referred me to another neurologist about botox injections and I am about to see another gynecologist about hormones again.

    I’m not giving up. I consult doctors. I look for triggers and guard against them. I am an active in my care. I read about migraines. But I am becoming worn out. What am I missing?

  • Molly Sweeny
    7 years ago

    Louise M. Houle how are the butterbur and coq10 enzymes working?

  • Louise M. Houle
    8 years ago

    You can also get a prescription and buy a 10ml multidose vial of Sodium Chloride to mix with the 1ml of DHE using an appropriately sized syringe to accommodate the extra fluid. Mix well by rub between both hands. When I inject this mix it cuts down the burning pain by 90%.

  • Kimberly Darling Rankin
    8 years ago

    Y’all, if DHE helps, but the injections are what keeps you from using it more frequently, consider talking to your specialist about having a PICC line inserted. I have one, and it has made a huge difference in getting away from the triptans. It is also INFINITELY better than those painful injections– DHE burns like hot lava!

    Best of luck to you both.

  • Louise M. Houle
    8 years ago

    Felt like I was reading my own story Laura. I’m so sorry you are having such a hard time. Like you, I’ve been refractory to all (18) prophylactics I’ve tried for daily migraines in the last 10 years. Botox helps reduce shooting head pains but not the frequency or severity of my migraines. I take Amerge and Ketoprofen daily to manage, occasionally switching to DHE for a week which enables me to take less meds, but I can’t inject for longer periods because of the local pain, and as you said, diarrhea. Drag! Even long rounds (up to 5 wks) of corticosteroids no longer break the chronic pattern. I ask myself the same question – what am I missing? What next? Not giving up though. Good to encourage each other to keep trying. Am now trying Butterbur & CoQ10 Enzymes, and the occasional chiropractic “tune up”. Will give it 4 months at least… Hang in there!

  • Dianne Dueck
    8 years ago

    I guess I’d have to consider myself a chronic migrainer….as I endure them more days than not. Any Dr’s in Manitoba that would consider Botox?

  • Bethany Hamilton
    7 years ago

    Find a medical spa.

  • Teri Robert
    8 years ago

    Thanks, Louise! That’s an excellent idea.

  • Louise M. Houle
    8 years ago

    You can email Brent at “Help for Headaches” Ontario and ask him if he knows of anyone. See his website: http://www.headache-help.org/our-goals-inform-educate-headaches. Good luck!

  • Louise M. Houle
    8 years ago

    Thanks for these reminders Teri. I’ve been told though that since I’ve been refractory to all prophylactic treatments in the last 10 years (18 medications tried, including cocktails & Botox), trying another preventative medication will likely fail again. Hmmm…. My migraines are daily and mainly managaed with Amerge & Ketoprofen. Because I overuse Triptans in order to function in the day to day, I have also tried various withdrawal protocols with DHE &/or corticosteroids for up to 5 week periods at a time – to no avail. You say there are 100 preventatives? Is there a list somewhere I can consult and is it worth trying again? I’ve compiled a list of about 33 preventatives so far: http://sites.google.com/site/migrainezero/medicaments.

  • Teri Robert
    8 years ago

    You’re very welcome, Louise. I’m glad you won’t give up. I do know how hard it is to keep believing and trying. Any time you need someone to talk to, you know where to find me.

  • Louise M. Houle
    8 years ago

    Thanks for the encouragement Teri. Just hard at times to keep believing, but I won’t give up! My Botox migraine specialist informed me of the slim probability of another prophylactic working after having been refractory to several. Can’t remember the exact stats, but he wasn’t encourageing. I have a neurologist (migraine specialist) though, one of the best, who will keep trying things as long as I’m willing. He even prescribed Butterbur & CoQ10 at my request just to give me a break from all the side effects of preventative drugs I’ve tried. Hoping they’ll help. (Will update our meds list. Some docs here in Montreal do use NSAIDs for managing daily pain in refractory cases, in spite of rebound risks if nothing else works. Like using Triptans on a daily basis, which I do)

  • Teri Robert
    8 years ago

    Louise, do you see a Migraine specialist? The specialists I know would never tell you that another preventive is likely to fail. Yes, there is a list of potential preventives at http://www.helpforheadaches.com/articles/Migraine-Preventive-Medications.htm

    I notice that you listed NSAIDs as preventives. NSAIDs can actually cause medication overuse headache, so they’re not used as preventives. Hope this helps. Don’t give up, Louise. I really believe you can find effective treatment.

  • Karen Stanley Haack
    8 years ago

    The allergist saved Sami’s life……That should be the first on a migrainers list instead of the neurologist who are mostly full of crap….Our said Sami was lying and had conversion disorder. He was the biggest a$$hole. Remember sami had all the auras, vomiting, dizziness, passing out, loss of peripheral vision paraplega (yes she became paralysed) asphasia every migraine symptom. The allergist figured it out. She is allergic to fungus which is in a lot of foods, histamine intolerant…food again, mold. bread grows mold after one day and just about every nut. Needless to say her gut is inflammed from all the misdiagnosis. Yes foods are triggers when your allergic to them. Were they migraines hell yeah…No meds helped.

  • Jeannie Wright
    8 years ago

    Our allergist has been our biggest support too. Zero help from neurologists and metabolic specialists.

  • Poll