Sharing IS caring – Tell us your migraine story

You never know whom you’ll reach with your migraine story. Here on Migraine.com, site visitors are encouraged to take a proactive role in both self-care and in sharing stories with others.

We really believe that taking the time to tell your personal story about migraine will help you as well as the thousands of visitors to the site.

I have been keeping my blog, somewhat quietly, for years now—only in the last few years did I really start telling people that I led a double life as “The Migraine Girl.” Our local paper did a Sunday cover story on my struggle with migraine and my advocacy work here on Migraine.com and with the National Headache Foundation, and many, many more people found out that I deal with this disease. Despite my openness about my condition, many casual friends, colleagues, and acquaintances had no idea that I had migraines at all—forget the fact that the disease plays such a huge role in my daily life.

Since that cover story and since my involvement with Migraine.com began last year, all sorts of folks have come out of the woodwork. I’ve gotten phone calls and emails from old friends, often written in a confessional tone: “I have migraines, too! I never really told anyone about them.” “I would lie in bed for days, just crying with pain. I didn’t want anyone to know.” Now the reasons why we keep our migraine a secret is a subject for another blog post at another time. What I want to talk about here is how many people have come out of the woodwork.

I am shocked (truly) by the number of people who have reached out to me, many of whom who have said they never talk about migraine but that it felt good to find someone who understood. (It seems they don’t realize that there are millions of us; you can barely throw a rock without hitting a migraineur!) Everyone has said it was such a relief to finally talk about their disease. And all it took from me was to “confess,” to share my story.

So I encourage you to share your story. You never know what emotion, what perspective might encourage the passive reader to finally get better care. You never know what details you share might convince someone to finally share her story or to tell her doctor about her symptoms. You have a wonderful opportunity to start to heal from the emotional pain this disease can cause, and you have a chance to inspire someone else.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

View Comments (2)

Poll