Stigma Makes It Harder to Live with Migraines

Migraine is a disease
If you have Migraines, you’ve almost certainly encountered the stigma associated with Migraine disease…

  • the misconception that a Migraine is “just a headache,” and we should be able to pop a couple of Tylenol or Excedrin and “get over it.”
  • people who have the attitude that Migraines are “all in our heads,” and we’re just “high-strung” people who need to see a psychiatrist.
  • the sighs and eye rolling we encounter from people who have never experienced a Migraine.
  • the assumption that Migraineurs can’t handle stress, so we couldn’t possibly handle a job with much responsibility.

Well, you know the drill. To me, it brings to mind the old saying about adding insult to injury. I’ve often wished for a big band-aid to slap across my forehead when I have a Migraine — one that says “Migraine is a DISEASE!”

When I’ve mentioned the stigma of Migraine to people who don’t have Migraines, the responses have been mixed. Some have been surprised; others have made comments about people with Migraine needing to stop worrying about what other people think. Until recently, there wasn’t much in the way of anything concrete to share about the stigma and how it affects us. But, in June (2010), a group of researchers from the Jefferson Headache Center in Philadelphia, presented a research poster at the American Headache Society’s annual scientific meeting.

The purpose of the study on which the poster was based was “To characterize stigma in patients with chronic and episodic Migraines1,” and their results and conclusions go a long way in validating how many Migraineurs feel about the stigma. In this study, participants with chronic Migraine scored significantly higher on the Stigma Scale for Chronic Illness (SSCI) than a mixed panel of patients with other chronic neurologic diseases — stroke, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s, ALS and Parkinson’s disease.

The lead researcher, Dr. J. E. Park, commented:

“You can’t see it, so people don’t understand the condition, and co-workers and employers sometimes think the person is trying to get more time off for something unimportant because they don’t think the pain and suffering is real.” 2

The stigma associated with Migraine disease is very real, and it makes it more difficult for us to live with the disease. As Migraineurs, there are a couple of ways we can view this issue:

  1. We can see it as a problem for the medical community to solve through research and public education; or
  2. we can see it as a problem to be addressed by everyone who is impacted by the Migraines and the stigma.

I very strongly believe that the second option is the better choice. It goes back to the old saying, “If you’re not part of the solution, you’re part of the problem.” Each of us can make a difference here by standing up for ourselves and other Migraineurs whenever possible. The best way to fight this stigma is by educating people. Explain some of the basic facts about Migraine disease so them. If you’d like to use them, I’ve written some letters that you can use for this purpose. I keep copies of them with me so I can simply reach into my purse and hand them to people I encounter. To find the letters, just follow the link I’ve provided for more information about Migraine and stigma.

Will you join me in fighting this stigma? Would you like to discuss it? You can leave a comment on this post to join me in a discussion.

For more information on Migraine and stigma, including two podcasts featuring two of the Jefferson Headache Center doctors, as well as letters you can share to educate people about Migraine disease see More About Migraine and Stigma.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.
View References
Park J.E.1; Kempner J.2; Young W.B. "The Stigma of Migraine." Poster presentation. 52nd annual meeting of the American Headache Society. Los Angeles. June, 2010. • Holohan, Ellin. "For Migraine Sufferers, Stigma Adds to Burden." HealthDay News. Bloomberg Businessweek. June 25, 2010.

Comments

View Comments (62)
  • Trisha27
    3 years ago

    Thanks Teri,
    I have had migraines for 20 years. I am 57 so the memories of a pain free life keep me going. I have become an expert at hiding my pain. Even my family and friends do not fully understand. They try but out of the blue someone will tell me about some miracle cure I should try. I will not give up though. I am a stubborn woman. Someday, I only hope research will find an answer to legitimize my pain to the outside world.

  • sarah
    3 years ago

    This is probably not PC, but I have found much love, support and understanding through my faith. I’ve had many a day when I leaned heavily on the shoulders of Jesus. One thing is for sure, he encountered the very worst this world offers of physical pain and emotional pain. Although, at times, I feel alone with this condition, I know for sure there is someone who fully understands.

  • MiLynn
    4 years ago

    My GP is good, my local small town ER is also great. They have all my records and don’t question me. When I go to the ER they have what works for me in their files. I don’t remember what all it is but one thing is some kind of Benadryl. There are no narcotics in it because they don’t help me at all, no matter how strong they are. BUT.. the so called specialists I have seen have been something else. The last one, she is listed as a migraine specialist, told me that I was to old (54) to have migraines so it must be that I had a bad marriage! Her advise was maybe we needed marriage counseling. I can’t even explain where she was coming from there. I won’t be seeing any more neurologists, it has been a waste of time and money.

  • brainpain22
    5 years ago

    Going through pain like we do is unacceptable, but we all do it every day because of the studies that are out there and because of the stigma that is still attached to every patient who goes to ER for pain relief. I just had to find a new neurologist so my family doctor is prescribing my meds…of course he does not like what I am on so he wants to change them. Also I told him I had to go to ER two weeks ago. You should have seen his disapproving face when he asked me what they gave me. The minute I said diluadid, he started shaking his head and actually rolled his eyes. I know that diluadid is not the standard protocol that neurologists would like to be used in ER but I usually only have to go to the ER ONCE A YEAR so I don’t see a problem, (never a rebound migraine)…I don’t drink, I don’t smoke, I don’t do drugs, and until about 18 months ago my eating habits were very healthy…why should I live in pain? My own family places a stigma on me and my migraines as well. They don’t think I can hurt that many days in row and if I do…I should just deal with it. What are you going to do? If only our migraines came with lab results, an x-ray, a rash that was only seen with migraines. I don’t think that would help the doctors who don’t want to give out certain pain relievers. That only comes with education.

  • Teri-Robert author
    5 years ago

    brainpain22,

    Well and truly said! With the research that shows opioids can make our Migraines worse, we certainly want to avoid them when we can, BUT there are times when we really don’t have many choices.

    One question I always ask when considering a new Migraine specialist is what his or her protocol is for patients who need help after hours, weekends, and holidays. I also expect them to prescribe rescue medication for times when my “regular” meds fail. My rescue meds have keep me out of the ER for at least five years now. Take a look at Migraine Management Essential 6: Rescue Treatment at http://migraine.com/blog/migraine-management-rescue-treatment/.

  • Cece Yuhas
    5 years ago

    Mom had Migraines, so she understood, when sister hit her late 20’s she started getting them, one brother started getting them (not often, enough to take prescriptions) in late 20’s as well. When I was in Junior High the teacher said “We are going to do Headstands.” I just stood there, she came over, I told her it would give me a Migraine, she said “So one or I will flunk you.” (She didn’t like my sister, before me, nor me) I did one perfectly, 5 minutes later started running downstairs, she asked where I was going, I puked on the floor and in my long hair with a full blown Migraine. The next day my mom took me to the Doctor he wrote me a note “Whatever Ms Yuhas says will give her a Migraine, she does not have to do in gym.” then signed his name making it legal for as long as I was in her class (the next year as well). Talk about stigma!!

  • Sara
    6 years ago

    Thanks for this post Teri. My Mom is the only one who can “see” my migraines. It must be a mother’s thing, because no one else can see it. I have lost jobs over migraine, let alone been stigmatized. I think the positive is that migraines have made me reevaluate my life. What do I really want to spend time doing? Who do I really want to spend time with? Since you can hardly do anything, you might as well make the stuff you do count….

  • PegB
    1 year ago

    I love how you just said beautifully, what it took me a page to say! I’m sure I will quote you one day!

  • PegB
    1 year ago

    Funny you used that word. I have a couple of times, recently used the word illigitimate in describing how migraines are viewed, or at least how we feel migraines are viewed. I’m 61, have had migraines since 36. I have a supportive husband, have received generous disability since age 42 (aha…legitimized!) and have a few, very few good friends. Still, I do not talk about my pain, I “find a balance” to manage the pain (which has over many years become Topomax and Butalbitol …both more than I would like). I no longer aspire to a full life. The days I get out, particularly those I volunteer or contribute in some way are great days. They remind me of gratitude. Get me out of my head. Off topic…. But mentioning my “headache” or explaining why I can’t do something just goes nowhere for me. Thus the tight circle of friends…gotta understand I might cancel….but you will likely get a nice pot of soup one day out of the blue. I lost friends over choices, once I learned I can go to my kids soccer game today or to lunch with you…not both. And never a group thing (too much brain activity). “Friends don’t always get, “ how could she feel fine to volunteer for 2 hours yesterday but not to go to lunch today.” My best life became active choices about what to do to best enhance my own quality of life, my feelings of contributing, intimacy, giving back, engaging, ego, etc balanced iwith social tolerance, pain level or anticipated pay back fatigue (tricky). This is all best done for me as nobody else business. My headaches began with and are attributed to chemo and radiation (long story and believe me, cancer is much easier to deal with socially, emotionally because it is legit!) which I find helps to draw a legitimacy link for others…so sometimes I lead with that, and certainly has helped in the disability arena. So for this , frankly I know I am one of the lucky ones!

  • Simplymartha
    6 years ago

    Hi, I’ve been suffering with migraines since the age of 19. It is hereditary with my mom and older sister having them, only to cease after menopause. I just wanted to let anyone who is working that there is the family medical leave act that secures your job. It requires you doctors input, but worth having the proper paperwork filled out through your employer. I encourage anyone to look into it.

  • eman
    6 years ago

    I grew up with the stigma as my mother suffered with terrible migraines. My family had hoped that I had managed to dodge the migraine bullet but as I approached my mid twenties I started to get them occasionally. In the last 12-18 months (am now 33) they have changed again – becoming more frequent and severe and mostly sit behind my left eye. While this is absolutely excrutiating, something good that has come with this is that my actually seems to swell. As I work in a predominantly male environment (mining) I feel pressure to soldier on which I find impossible to do when I’m experiencing an attack. Thankfully, the swollen eye and obviously pained expression on my face means that my colleagues are able to see that I’m unwell (if I actually make it into the office).

    I have previously had my boss text me to ask when I thought I would be coming in because he “needed the support” after I’d previously advised that I had a migraine and wouldn’t be in. Lucky for him I was too ill to respond and give him a mouthful.

  • Michelle
    6 years ago

    I deal with the stigma as a healthcare professional. There are others that I work with have migraines so I hear what others say about them when they call in. I will make a comment about and they will tell me “But you’re different.” Even so, I can tell they don’t believe me. Yet, there are those days when I am at work they see me start getting one. Eventually my eyes give it away. The squint of my eyes, especially my right eye. The blinking to the sound and my unusual quietness. I know they believe me to a point about the pain. I try… I am also a massage therapist so I do try more then just medications. I believe in holistic and alternative medicines. And there are times when these work, but there are times when it actually makes it worse. I’m so glad I found this site to help me talk with others that suffer so I don’t feel so alone.

  • Harris Tredeau
    7 years ago

    The migraine stigma ruined my life as no one in my wife’s family and quite often my wife herself just did not understand how real the pain of a migraine is and the fear I live with of getting them it is a fear of not wanting to be consumed by pain, nausea and eventually vomiting.My wife would vent her frustration to her friends or even mine creating friction in almost any friendship I had by making poor excuses for my inability to go places sometime or an occasional family function she would tell everyone I was home on drugs for a headache instead of taking the time to actually become informed enough to explain to family and friends what a migraine is and just how incapacitating they are, So I was pretty much labeled as a husband that just did not want to go anywhere or do fun things with his beautiful and bubbly wife, and my own wife I trusted through 15 years of marriage contributed to the stigma in so many ways, in her credit she did put up with a lot from my frequent migraine bouts and depression and in fact I do still love her even today while she continues to hurt me in many ways I won’t get into. The closest anyone on my wife’s side of the family had come to my situation was my mother in-law, she seamed to really have migraine attacks by her description and was eventually diagnosed by a doctor, but she did not get them as often as I. So even she did not want to believe that I got them more frequently or the length of time one can last until the medication finally decides to work.So yes Stigma after all these years is still very hurtful and continues to ruin lives.

  • Sheryl Lovingme
    7 years ago

    I’ve had a headache everyday for 15 months straight and people seem to think this is a joke. I would gladly invite them into my world Gladly give away the nausea, feeling okay one minute wanting to disappear the next, having to work with a daily headache not that I want to I have too.

  • Tammy Grooms
    7 years ago

    pray harder..we are having pastor anniversary this week at 7:30 come on over come yo pain i promise…

  • Stacey Richardson
    7 years ago

    I completely understand this have suffered since my early 20’s with migraines had seizures also until a osteoma was found on parietal lobe and removed, cured seizures but, not migraines. Have many people who don’t understand the problems and pain associated with mgranes have heard more than once maybe I psyched myself into it, or I allow the pain to come which all of you who suffer know that is not the way it works. I have a headache everyday of my life, some days I can function others I wish I wouldn’t wake up to feel the pain, the naseau or get to see the pretty twinkling lights (yeah right) but I have faith that with all of us who suffer demanding answers and research life wll get better even if things are only reduced by having a couple more good days than bad.

  • Muriah Hutchinson
    7 years ago

    I had a really bad migraine today! I took 2 excedrin migraine before work @10am, took another at one, than another at 4, then finally my mom brought me my Imitrex! I just got home from work and feel like I’m going to puke.

  • Nan Heidt
    7 years ago

    I know someone who, when they took a half of an Imitrex troche (the first time she tried it), they had their first 4 day migraine. She can’t take the stuff – it makes her migraines worse – she’s not alone.

  • Lisa Campbell
    7 years ago

    lol

  • Muriah Hutchinson
    7 years ago

    Lisa Campbell if we had alot of snow, i’d stick my head in a snowdrift! lol

  • Lisa Campbell
    7 years ago

    I hope you feel better I know how they are and I rember you having them alot when we were kids

  • Muriah Hutchinson
    7 years ago

    I’ve had severe migraines since i was in elementary school

  • Jennifer Collins-Gonzalez
    7 years ago

    anything people don’t understand there is a stigma attached to it! So just relax and breathe and take your meds, avoid your triggers and keep on truckin..

  • Catherine Charrett-Dykes
    7 years ago

    we need awareness, the only problem w/that is we are usually too sick to be able to do anything about it.

  • Dina Issa
    7 years ago

    People (including doctors) make you feel like a hyperchondriac when you have migraine.

  • Denyse Leahy
    7 years ago

    Well in a sort of not so nice way I am lucky to have a neurologist who also suffers with migraines, which makes him a bit more empathic toward any patient suffering from one. He manages with Excedrin for Migraines. Nothing seems to help me but time.

  • Nan Heidt
    7 years ago

    Teri Robert Don’t they all? The program ER did enough damage by portraying their yearly stigmatizing scene of a returning migraine patient as “drug seeking.” The thing is that when they fail to do enough to abort the migraine it WILL be back – no other pain patient gets treated like that.

  • Catherine Charrett-Dykes
    7 years ago

    Teri, i agree w/finding a new dr but it still shouldn’t happen…we shouldn’t have to dx ourselves when we are going to them for help….they go to school for this

  • Teri Robert
    7 years ago

    Dina,
    If your doctor makes you feel like a hypochondriac, you need a new doctor!

  • Fabienne Isabella Rouzeau Valdes
    8 years ago

    I’ve been feeling this at work just this week. I got called on the carpet for calling out sick too much– eventhough I went to work and got sent home on multiple occasions when they could see how sick I was– eventhough I made up all but two days of lost time– and eventhough I showed up for extra shifts every time I was asked to.

  • Dawn Lash
    7 years ago

    Make sure you get letters from your doctor stating you are being treated for a CHRONIC CONDITION – it’s a very frustrating situation indeed – I’ve been doing better with my migraines, but had a nasty one on Friday and had to call in sick – my boss whined at me, and tried the guilt factor – sorry, I do NOT eat “Guilt Cheese Sandwiches”; the migraine continued to Saturday, and I had to cancel all plans and got a VERY rude comment from someone I was supposed to meet up with. They were just lucky I was even able to make the friggin’ phone call at ALL! Grrrr!

  • Elly O'Connor
    8 years ago

    The stigma needs to be kicked to the curb….they ARE literally incapacitating!!! The blurred vision, nausea, extreme pain – just to name a few characteristics – makes it impossible to function “normally”!!! MIGRAINE IS A DISEASE!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Megan Sargent-Roberge
    8 years ago

    That’s no good Fab! No one knows what migraines are like until they’ve been crippled by one. It is literally incapacitating…but I’m preaching to the choir, right? Miss you Fab!!!

  • Gloria Danaher
    8 years ago

    R U Kidding me????????????????????

  • Marisol Carter
    8 years ago

    Thanks for bringing this to light..I am a sufferer and so many people think it is just a headache..most just don’t understand..even doctors sometimes think you just want drugs or painkillers..it’s sad, hurtful and most of all adds to the pain.

  • Tracy Brooks
    8 years ago

    Amen to that! I am gonna print out this article and hand it out to those people who have this stigmata!

  • Cathy Frost
    8 years ago

    I have mentioned to someone before that migraines are a disease and I got the roll of the eyes in response….I am happy to finally see this in print. I have felt like this for a long time and this is the exact response I get from people who don’t understand. I just got to the point where I feel that those people, who do not understand are ignorant Now, all they have to do is educate themselves and stop being so ignorant.

  • April McLaughlin
    8 years ago

    Yep…I agree with that. The stigma is something that is aweful because you can’t necessarily “prove” migraines like you can cancer. Makes it challenging! But I promise, if you were to do the anti-fungal diet/cleanse, your migraines would go away!!! If you stuck with it for 3 months, you would see. May not even take that long.

  • Cathy Frost
    8 years ago

    Thank you for your response. I assure you – I know my food triggers. And I am aware of what supplements to take. But, that does not stop the stigma.

  • April McLaughlin
    8 years ago

    I promise 🙂

  • April McLaughlin
    8 years ago

    I agree that Migraines are a disease; however, most diseases can be cured by diet and supplements. 🙂

  • Migraine.com
    8 years ago

    If you have Migraines, you’ve almost certainly encountered the stigma associated with Migraine disease….

    Read Teri’s overview of recent research at http://migraine.com/blog/stigma-makes-it-harder-to-live-with-migraines/.

  • Nan Heidt
    7 years ago

    Jennifer Ann Shutt It’s like waking up from a coma – only we didn’t have the pleasure of sleeping through it…

  • Maria Talarico
    8 years ago

    Feel better Abby!

  • Lori Glasgow-Brininger
    8 years ago

    Hope you get some relief Abby… I feel your pain! When I only get a half day that’s pain free in a week, I start to get ‘down’ too!! Woke up this morning with an 8!! I thank God every time my Zomig works for me, because there are times when it doesn’t… nothing does!! We’re here for you, don’t give up!

  • Bonna Mullaly
    8 years ago

    Hugs Abby! Feel better!!

  • Abigail Bristow
    8 years ago

    no one around me really truely understands except my mother who is thousands of miles away and the drs look at me as a drug seeker. yes I want visaril to keep me from puking and maybe whatever they want to give me for pain except imatex and maxalt as they don’t work! just please pretend that you care! or give me something that will help permanetly work! wish you all the best of care and I wish that we didn’t have to deal with oh it’s nothing get over yourself and just suck it up I can’t get out of bed most days and I feel so bad because I feel like I am cheating my husband and son. I just want a decent life I want to work and be successful and of course pain free. I just want this all to end.. I am so down ans there is just no dr that will send me to pain management! anyway I hope everyone is pain free or at least pain manageable wish everyone the best <3 U <3 abby

  • Bonna Mullaly
    8 years ago

    Camille – I’m a fellow 20 year veteran with you, longer than that but they didn’t get frequent till 20-22 years ago.

  • Bonna Mullaly
    8 years ago

    Of the few times I’ve endured an ER for a migraine (I think of the ER as just more torture when I’ve got a really bad one – bright lights, noise and the forever wait), they’ve always looked at me and could tell I had one. I get pale, my eyes just look different – don’t know how to explain how they look, anyway, close friends and family can usually take one look at me and say ohhhhh you have a migraine don’t you – even the ones that aren’t as severe as some and you take your meds and try to force yourself to do something. Another thing I never realized till this weekend, evidently I get very shaky with one, a friend noticed that, I’m thinking pain does that to you. I do despise people who say when I get a headache I take a tylenol or a motrin and I’m fine. Well good for them, and when they have an attitude sometimes I think (and I know this is mean) well maybe they should get just one migraine to know the difference between a tyelenol/motrin headache and a migraine that makes you want to die!

  • Londa Taylor-Craven
    8 years ago

    they keep changing my meds, I just want the pain to stop, its making it so hard for me to do my shcool work, its hard enough going back at my age

  • Maria Meyer
    8 years ago

    And that is so very true. So much stigma, misunderstanding, unwillingness to understand and learn. “Can’t you just take a pill?” Ha! I take a daily preventive prescription (it tries to prevent them, anyway), abortive prescription when necessary (which isn’t 100% effective 100% of the time), 2-5 vitamin/alternative tx daily “preventive” pills. Getting just 8 migraines in a month is a dream. Usually 10 is the very minimum! Retail managers are the worst for understanding! Well, mine is. “You have to call 2 hrs before your shift starts.” Well, next time, if it’s less than that, maybe I will, and I will happily puke in her car. That might almost start to educate that one! A little spiteful, but so few really know. Some claim to, but unless they’ve had a true migraine, they really don’t!

  • Maria Meyer
    8 years ago

    @ Heather Even though Fiorinal also has aspirin and caffeine like Excedrin, it also has butalbital (a barbiturate) instead of acetaminophen (general pain reliever like Tylenol). There is a huge difference between those (even if just one drug name is different)! A barbiturate is a strong sedative, available only by prescription. So, the combo of drugs in Fiorinal will likely be much more effective for you than regular Excedrin. Sometimes certain drugs can affect blood sugar or hemoglobin levels, so it can be wise to test before putting you on a new one so they can establish a baseline or monitor if there’s a problem. Also, check with your hospital/clinic business office to see if there are financial assistance or charity programs. Sometimes you just have to seek them out since they won’t exactly advertise them! Ask your pharmacist about that as well, and to see if there’s a generic equivalent, and/or go to the website of the drug company to see if you can get it free or at reduced cost. The few extra steps can literally save hundreds or even thousands of dollars. Best wishes for finding an effective and affordable solution!

  • Jaylene Ancheta
    8 years ago

    I get chronic migraines. Some people in my family understand but, not all of them and not completely. They get them sometimes and so they think they know. What they don’t experience is what the one who gets them chronically experiences. I am real sensitive to my sleep routines and various other routines. I need to have the same schedule every day. Yet, it’s my family members that come and disrupt it the most for me and sets my migraines off. Families and the general public both need to be educated about migraines. It’s a disease and yes, it can also be a handicap. People, please educate yourself. There are more than 30 million Migraineurs in the world today for which there is NO cure.

  • Kristen Davidson
    8 years ago

    i get migraines..quite frequently..i decided that the emergency shot for the really bad ones isnt happening for me..i cant stand going in for one and getting the “seeker” treatment..my sister is a rn and says they cant tell if u r lying or not..i believe they should pull up our records and see that some of us are diagnosed..and really need to be seen..this really peeves me..

  • Veta A. Rodriguez Miller
    8 years ago

    I agree, migraines are a disease. They cause delays and hold ups in life. I use to have them 3 or 4 times a week. Was not fun. I do not take meds for it because i am too sensitive with meds. Now it is maybe 1 to 2 a week. Let me know when you make bandaids that say migraines are a disease so i buy them and wear them.

  • Heather Sargent
    8 years ago

    I did not see a Dr for about 3 years due to lack of insurance. $90 or more per visit plus cost of meds was just too much to afford. Now I finally get in to see a Dr after the Migraine from hell I had last week and he looks at me as if I’m stupid. Like he can’t understand why I waited until now to see a Dr. (Even though he saw I had a visit to the ER a couple months ago for flu, dehydration and a Migraine.) He gave me 30 pills of Fiorinal to help prevent the headaches I have every day, but then I researched it and found it can be addictive? Like it is any better than taking 4 Excedrin at the onset of a headache just to prevent a TH or Migraine? It’s the same stuff as Excedrin almost. One ingredient different. I don’t know what to do. He wants to check my blood sugar for diabetes and I already know I’m Anemic and have been for years and it never gets any better, so why bother testing me for Anemia? He did actually say something about an MRI or a CScan if blood work comes back ok, so I guess there is an upside, if he follows through.

  • Maxine Darling Lacombe
    8 years ago

    I actually had a Nurse tell Me it was a learned behavior!!! LOL!!

  • Judy Rainbolt Ellis
    8 years ago

    I am so lucky that my family understands completely. I have come across this at work…..but eventually that will change too. I love it when they get sinus headaches for the first time. Good time to show the comparison! Good luck! And Thursday is Botox shot time for me!!! Yay, no headaches for a while!!!

  • Genie Skinner
    8 years ago

    I remember 20 years ago, when I was in my early 20’s and my sister was in her 30’s. She had migraines, and I was guilty of thinking that she was being dramatic. I could not understand why she missed so much time from work, and was always loosing jobs. =( I was so wrong. I was 29 when I had my first migraine, and now have several ER visits a year for them. I can tell you that I am not being dramatic when I have a migraine, at times I pray for death because I cannot bare it any longer. My husband, though he is sympathetic, does not even understand. We are conservative, but I once told him that if someone said that medical use marijuana would cure a migraine, I would definitely do it….he went crazy with “not in my house you wouldn’t!” Clearly he does not understand the desperation for relief from a migraine.

  • Marisol Carter
    8 years ago

    Friends and Family out there please, please educate yourselves about migraines!!!! They are not just headaches!!

  • Jennifer Ann Shutt
    8 years ago

    I can barely function when I get a full blown migraine. I basically have to put my whole life on hold until it goes away.

  • Samantha Ann Harrell
    8 years ago

    it also a diability for most who have them sevre

  • Poll