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The In-Between Days: When you don’t have a full-fledged migraine but aren’t quite yourself either

Migraine.com reader favoriteOne of the most difficult things those of us with lifelong illness (including all types of migraine, including episodic migraine disease) deal with is the way illness manifests itself from one day to the next.

Today and yesterday, I’ve been a little “floaty”—you know, not fully present, not feeling quite like myself.  When I’m feeling good, I tend to be engage in witty banter with people, but I’ve noticed the last few days that it takes me a minute to come up with a fitting response to customers who joke with me at the bookshop.  Jim asks me a question and it takes me several seconds to register his request. I go to instruct an intern about how to do that day’s task and can’t think of the words “cash register,”  “delegate,” or “organize.”

Last night, a migraine started to approach in but never really settled in all the way.  I got the aura and the achy neck, but a full-fledged attack never hit by the time I went to sleep, and I woke up mostly fine.  Mostly.


Except my brain doesn’t seem to be working right, and I’m fatigued.  I am grateful to not be sick today, but I’m frustrated at being stuck again in one of these In-Between Days.

Do these days happen to you?  My anecdotal research indicates that both chronic and episodic migraineurs experience these In-Between Days, days when they’re not at 100% but not suffering from a significant migraine attack either.

How do you cope with this strange state of being?  Are there things you do to help make sure the scales don’t tip toward migraine?

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • Deirdre2
    5 years ago

    When I just feel I can’t function right, I have to remember I have a neurological disease, and give myself grace, rather than beat myself up about it. When I do feel 100%, I DO get a lot done.

  • Beth
    5 years ago

    Hi!! I was just diagnosed with migraines. I’m 55 years old and for the past few years, I’ve had what my kids so kindly call brain farts!! I couldn’t figure out what was happening to me. I’ve had bad headaches, especially right before a storm. Last month, I thought I was dying. Half my face was numb, someone had stuck an ice pick in my head and applied electric shocks. I’m so glad to read about this symptom. Even today, my husband asked me if I was ok. I felt ok…but I can’t find the words. It’s wonderful to know I’m not alone!

  • Luna
    6 years ago

    This is how I look at it. Migraine is not a headache it is a brain dysfunction with stages and levels. I just consider these days as silent migraine days. Which I have a lot of. Get me around odors and my brain can not remember or communicate well at all. Very difficult to be around people for very long. Can’t string a sentence well or conversation. And so many people do not understand but if I can remember to say “my brain isn’t functioning right now”. Most people relate to that. I try to be at peace with life and go with the flow. Some times I would like to be more social but having acute week wasting headaches more often isn’t worth it. After being out shopping or visiting, etc. I must change clothes and hang them out side to air out. Then wash my hair and rinse with acv to cut down on the odor. Can feel the smells on my skin, yuk. Have never considered “in between” days. Just silent, mild, moderate, half blown and full blown.

  • mattparker
    6 years ago

    I’ve been dealing with migraines for 30 + years. What I find in those days that I don’t have a full-fledged migraine is I have to search for words and even thoughts. Its hard because I am usually a very sharp person. My kids even notice and get flustered and mad cuz I cant help with homework.

  • yaiyai789
    6 years ago

    On the end between days that are few for me because I’m a chronic migrainer. I put on a hat, a pair of dark sun glasses and go work in the yard. It gets my mind off the pain and I feel good that I’m able to do something that will show that I have done something. I don’t have to think about what I’m do I just do it. A few tears doesn’t hurt either. My TENS unit is a big help also.

  • Julie Ryan
    6 years ago

    I’ve been dealing with a chronic migraine for almost 4 weeks now. It’s ranged in intensity and I’ve had plenty of the “in between” times where I can function fairly well, but I’m still not quite there.

  • Barbara Schuster
    6 years ago

    Yep, I can relate. I have learned to view migraine as a hill: some symptoms are on the way up, some at the time, and unfortunately different ones on the way down. It takes time to recover from the unslaught of the migraine! Just like any other illness.

    I try to take it easy, i.e. do things that make me fell level, calm, and meditative. Even writing this makes me feel better because I am focused, sitting still and room is overcast from the very cloudy sky outside. The weather changes bring migraine, and can restart as I come down from the pain of the peak of the hill. So, I wait a bit and then before things blow up I take OTC migraine combo.

    Yesterday I saw my neuro doc and was given Fioricet to replace the OTC combo. That is because when the OTC won’t work (who knows why?) the big one can last for days!

    I can’t take triptans because of heart condition but I did take them in my 40s and Imitrex did work. I have tried a lot, and I mean a lot, of meds for migraine since then. I am in my 70s and have had the condition since I was 13. I suppose I am an expert at this.

    I have hope that as we learn more and more about how the brain works we will have more understanding of migraine. In the meantime, accept that that walk down the hill is a part of the brain fog from the migraine.

  • mia
    6 years ago

    Wow, thanks for that. I feel like you’re speaking for me in this post. I have so many days like this and how do you tell people? I get asked “are you feeling OK? Do you have a headache?” sometimes the answer is no to both, I don’t have a migraine but I’m definitely not feeling ok.

    As someone else commented below, the Topomax made this foggy feeling and word searching much worse. I blamed it on the meds for a long time, but even after going off the Topomax (they had me up to 200mg twice a day) I’m still experiencing these In-Between-Days as you say. Many of them.

    But then, any day without a migraine must be a good day, right? Even if I can’t remember what a clock is called while trying to intelligently participate in a big meeting at work. 🙂

  • DitzzzyWoman
    6 years ago

    Wow! I thought it was just me. When I look back over the years, I see that I too have many ‘in-between days’. Just the other day my husband barked at me asking “if there ever was a day I DIDN’T have a headache”. To be honest, actually NO. The pain is always there but its either on a very low pain level such as a 3-4 or beyond the moon and back 7-12. I struggle every single day with finding words to speak. Shame has become a silent friend everywhere I go and I have become almost mute by choice at home and in public because it affects me so much.

    Topomax only made it worse. My neurologist had me taking 200 mg a day and I could not even figure out how to get dressed at times. I had become an invalid and only after 9 months, I removed myself from the medication. I do not feel so alone anymore. Thank you for enlightening me. ((hugs)) <3

  • John Gould
    5 years ago

    I am astounded that I’m not alone in this! I really thought that I was having bad reactions to the meds I’m on, for migraine as well as other disorders, and maybe that has something to do with it, but I have those 3-4 pain days every day that I don’t have a full-fledged migraine, which I get about 4 times a week. DitzzzyWoman, I totally get what you’re saying. I teach at a college, and it is difficult (to say the least) to stand in front of a classroom and not be able to come up with the most basic words to explain a given concept. Fortunately, my students have learned to cue me in various ways, but it is still very upsetting.

    Thank you all for this community!

  • yaiyai789
    6 years ago

    I have tried everything that is out there and am now taking Floricet up to 6 a day on my bad days. Also have Botox injuctions every three months. Hang in there you are not alone. I have a husband that has Alzheimers who depends on me. On my bad migraine days I have to think real hard before repeating things or helping him.

  • Heidi
    6 years ago

    Wow. I never understood what was happening until I read this. I really thought I was slowly losing my mind. I have a demanding job that takes a lot of thought, reasoning, troubleshooting and it is embarrassing to find yourself interacting with people in this foggy state. I lose focus. Word finding is impaired. I seem so out of it. It takes so much more effort to get through the day in this state. Unfortunately this happens all too frequently. Thank you for this post. It helps to know other people experience this as well.

  • Dawnita (hollis)
    6 years ago

    Since my migraines are an after effect of my anoxic brain injury…I only get to take Advil and Caffeine for them. No other pain meds. I usually end up spending the day in a dark room with the door closed. I don’t have any responsibilities that I can’t delegate right now…and that is helpful.

  • Lousendy
    6 years ago

    Topamax is horrid for me. I get every single side effect. And I was only on 25mg/day. Nothing works except when it gets bad going to the ER. – a shot.

    I have many in between days… where I feel ‘floaty’ I have one today as a matter of fact. It’s also very rainy here today. I know my migraines are effected by the weather.

    I have also tried Immetrex – made my migraine worse!

    Topamax and Immitrex gave me the true understanding of the saying: “Sometimes the cure is worse than the disease.”

    On the in between days (like today), I make sure I drink tons and tons of water, watch my sugar intake carefully, as well as my caffeine intake. I make sure to at least have one cup of coffee, so I don’t go into a caffeine withdrawal headache…. This tight rope I walk when in fear of a migraine is sometimes scarier than the actual pain.

  • Laurie Vincent
    6 years ago

    I work full time so I have to work on the in-between days. My son told me about Gatorade stopping his Migraine headaches. So just like him, I drink a glass of Gatorade and it really helps.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    6 years ago

    Hi Laurie,

    It’s important for people with migraine not to become dehydrated. It seems when our overly sensitive systems get triggered by things like skipping meals, dehydration, hormonal fluctuations and many other things a migraine will ensue.

    If Gatorade help, drink up!

    Nancy

  • Cece Yuhas
    6 years ago

    What I do for my In-between days, I drink an extra cup or two of Coffee, if no appointments I soak in a hot bath tub to relax my muscles, take Tylenol with caffeine, my muscle relaxers, lay down with ice packs to the base of the head and to the top of the head and a hot wash cloth over the eyes. Unplug the phone, turn off the lights, no noise, put a “Do not Disturb Migraine Headache” note on my door and sleep, sipping gator aide and eating brown rice, if nauseous take Zofran.

  • Dawn Lloyd
    6 years ago

    When I feel the headache coming on, unfortunately there is nothing I can do, no med that works, nothing I know of and nothing I’ve tried, to date, that will prevent a migraine from happening. It’s frustrating.

    100 mg of Sumatriptin is all that works to alleviate pain. Some months ingest it like candy. I continue to try preventative treatments with hope that someday I will run across something that will work for me.

    Screw the doctors and insurance companies who say we can only have 9 pills a month. Screw the docs who say too much medication causes rebound headaches. I was having rebound headaches in the 1960’s before the term was invented and when the only medication available for headache was aspirin, which didn’t work for me. The headache patterns were the same then, when I was a child, as they are now, as a 50 yr old woman.

    If Sumatriptin/Imitrex works to relieve migraine pain and if you need more than 9 pills a month, I suggest you bypass the insurance companies and buy your own stash from online pharmacies or cross the border to buy more. Have 2 prescriptions going at one time, at different pharmacies, if necessary. Pay out of pocket, if necessary.

  • MaggieG
    6 years ago

    Agree with all of you regarding the hangover experience and fatigue in between migraines. My GP had me try Topamax which gave me a dull regular headache at some point everyday. I stopped taking it. Maybe I should have persisted? Anyone have an experience with this? Also someone said they use acupuncture to cope with the migraines. I am just starting this. How long does it take to start experiencing improvement? How did you know it was helping?

  • theresadz
    6 years ago

    Topamax so far has been the only thing that has brought my pain level down to a functioning level. I still have some pain every day but it’s 1-4s instead of 3-6s every day. While I was titrating up the side effects were awful and I’m pretty sure the brain fog is still a bit of an issue from it, but I would say the foggy days without the pain can still be a migraine, or at least part of a migraine. Migraine is a spectrum not just head pain.

  • Achinghead
    6 years ago

    I first tried Topamax in 2007 after having several mini-strokes which increased my migraines from 2-3 a month to near daily. I also had many of the bad side effects, and I couldn’t see any benefit from taking the Topamax, so this caused me to discontinue taking it. After changing doctors to a Neurologist/Headache Specialist in 2010, she started me on Topamax again, increasing the dose very slowly to 100mg 2X daily. I was very surprised that I experienced none of the side effects this time, and the Topamax did help reduce my migraines.

  • Lora
    6 years ago

    I agree with Yoyo. Topamax was a nightmare for me. The side effect that says you could find yourself searching for the right words is unfortunately true. My mind was a fog, I couldn’t complete simple sentences. Awful.

  • Yoyo
    6 years ago

    Topamax was HORRIBLE for me.

  • Xenia Salazar
    6 years ago

    OMG. I have suffered from chronic migraines forever.. in fact they have gotten worse in the last couple of years, and i get these in-between days.. in fact I have one now.. two days ago I had a severe migraine and the pain has subsided now, and i have that in between fuzzy brain feeling. It is soo aggravating!! I sometimes feel like there are so few days when i am feeling myself now, but I still move on. I can’t just stay home all the time, right? lol. Migraine hangover is very appropriate lol!! So good to be here, I didn’t know so many people had the same problems. I have not found my “magic pill” yet, as Imitrex is hit or miss sometimes..

  • Lora
    6 years ago

    Frova (a Triptan) has been my magic pill. I’ve been on Imitrex, Axert, Zomig, Amerge, Maxalt… none worked for me. Frova has been my life saver. Best of luck finding the right one for you 🙂

  • Tn5259jn
    6 years ago

    As a chronic migraineur of 34 years, I either actively have a migraine, or have constant head pain that isn’t throbbing…so this puts me constantly in this in-between state that you wrote so well about. It’s sad, but comforting to know that others experience this also. Maybe I’m not going as senile as I thought I was! I am just so weary of the social aspect of this disease…it is invisible and it is so hard to be around people all of the time when you are always in pain. They try to understand, but it is impossible, and not something I want to talk about either usually as it is just a fact of life. Sometimes I wish I had a flashing neon sign on my forehead that scrolled with my pain level as an alert signal for people so that they would understand when I don’t track well, or am non-functional occasionally, or sit with my lights off in my office. I do not let this disease stop me from doing things…I refuse to let it win. But oh some days the constancy becomes so heavy it is such a incredible load.

  • Barbara Schuster
    6 years ago

    Oh, Trisia I totally agree with you. I am retired now after many a decade as an elementary teacher and I miss it so much. However, I do remember many many days working with migraine, and I was a good teacher and mentor to other teachers in spite of the pain, brain fog and nausea. It became of part of me, of who I am.

  • Dawnita (hollis)
    6 years ago

    I wish I could say that sleeping a while helps, but sometimes it doesn’t…and sometimes it even makes it worse for me…as far as the fogginess, it ALWAYS does get worse.

  • Bonnie Troop
    6 years ago

    The In-Between time has certainly struck a chord with all of us since we speak the language: migraine. My mother and grandma had horrible migraines. It was hard to watch them suffer to the point I begged God to give me my mom’s headaches. Shortly after, at age nine, I too started having migraines, 2 or 3 a year, increasing in frequency until by age 21, until now, a span of 33 years, I have 2 to 3 migraines a day, every day. However, this is not a dire tale. When I asked God for my mother’s migraines I told God that I knew I could handle them better. It took a lot of persistence, constant exploration, and never giving up, but I have found a way to most of the time nip my migraines in the bud. I have a wide array of things in my arsenal to turn off the triggers and soothe the pain. The most persnickety trigger I have is the weather. I feel grateful to have a migraine medicine that works, along with an abundant array of know how and wisdom as to what works for me. My grandmother only had Darvocet, and my mother only had a Demerol shot she’d get at the ER 2 or 3 time a month. At 52 when my mother entered menopause her migraines ceased, thank God! At the time I was 17 and my migraines were just picking up speed. By age 21 I was having two to three migraines a day, every day. Not much in-between there! My time off from a migraine was about 12 hours every third day, and little did I know after 33 years I’d still be running the day and night migraine marathon! However, I feel really lucky to have so much more to choose from than my mom and grandmother ever did. As a trained psychic, passionate about spirit, I meditate daily to cleanse my energy. I also do not let a migraine stop me; the first time I flew solo in an airplane I had a migraine, selling a million dollars a year of computers a year I’d sign a client and go throw up afterwards. That same determination has kept me researching and exploring new things that might work for me, I’m always on the look out. Of course, after running this migraine marathon for so long sometimes I just get worn out and occassionally need to reschedule a reading. All in all though I have learned to have joy even amid the migraines. My mother and grandmother died rather young, I’m sure the pain they suffered shortened their life. I know they are smiling at me from heaven though, seeing how much more I have that works right, from taking my migraine medicine to eating right, keeping a watchful eye on my hypoglycemia and getting enough exercise, using ice or heat, TV as a distraction, or whatever I need to pull out of my arsenal of migraine tools. I’m grateful for what I’ve learned and what we share here on Migraine.com. I learn from all of you and am the better for it, thank you!

  • Barbara Schuster
    6 years ago

    What is the relationship between being physic and having migraine? I know several people who have this combo. Including me.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    6 years ago

    Thank you for sharing your story with us, Bonnie. You flew solo and have accomplished quite a lot with migraine disease – you should be very proud of yourself. You are an inspiration.

    And thank you for the kind words, we are glad you like Migraine.com. 🙂

    Nancy

  • Teresa Thomas
    6 years ago

    I usually get those ‘days’ after a bad migraine. Lisa is correct when she says that on in-between days, it is so easy to tip over into migraine country. I usually try to give my co-workers a heads up that I may need for them to slow down to my level or repeat things. They can be understanding, but sometimes you just get those ‘again?’ looks. That’s when I have to reaffirm to myself that I’m not just a slacker, that I really do have a medical condition. So bad for the career!

  • Lisa Mengucci
    6 years ago

    When I have those “in between days” I try to take it easy. They are the days where it wouldn’t take much to set off a migraine. Like I’m teetering on the edge. No gym. Take things slow. no perfume. And I keep my Imtitrex handy in case things start to go south.

  • khaug
    6 years ago

    I have had migraines for 30 years and now since my most “severe” migraines only come 2 or 3 times a month, thanks to the wonders of Botox, I am in this state of ‘in between’ a lot. So much that I have wondered if this is early Alzehiemers setting in!! My memory becomes foggy, I can’t find the right words….so very frustrating and embarrassing!! It really concerns me that it may compromise my career. I am very driven and love what I do. I just could not imagine giving that up for this disease!!

  • Barbara Schuster
    6 years ago

    Go get tested. It’s migraine, and you are probably not loosing it. I went for extensive tests and scored high for my age group:I had the same complaints as you do Previously I had my doc do a genetic test for the “loosing it.” It came back negative. The test is not covered by most insurance. If you can afford it get the test.
    I have peace of mind knowing that my condition is “migraine,” and Menier’s disease.

  • aquitaine
    6 years ago

    Oh those SO familiar “Foggy Brain” days!!!! I find for me, that I have significant word finding problems on those days. Those not quite full blown days also most frequently DO wind up being FULL blown before I go to bed, sad to say. And I take 2 different ‘prophylactic’ medications to help stave them off altogether on a daily basis. On the positive side, my current meds have shown an improvement in that there has been a decrease in my overall migraines, so, chalk one up for me for now! With SO much progress being made with so many other disorders, it certainly would be nice to see some REAL and CONSISTENT progress for Migraines!!! I’ve just turned 70, and my migraines have only increased since I was 16 years old……
    granted the medications are getting better, but it’s still ‘hit or miss’ — so back to the main topic — for me it’s a ‘brain fog’ day that is not one of my better functioning days.

  • Maggie
    6 years ago

    I call it a migraine hangover too, which is funny considering I never drink. I have the exact same feelings, unable to come up with words, feeling like I am not all there. Feeling extremely tired, drained.
    It seems like lately I am either having a migraine or coming off of one, rarely do I feel whole.

  • susanmcelroy
    6 years ago

    Yeah, I know this feeling. I don’t call it an “in-between day,” though. For me, it’s best described as a migraine hangover. The first few times I used this term with people, they thought I was crazy. The longer you think about it, though, the more sense it makes. When I’m doing bad, I either have this migraine hangover or a full-blown migraine…neither is good but it’s preferable I guess to be in a fog. I am very thankful for this site, though…and for your posts! Thanks for sharing!

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    6 years ago

    Hi susanmcelroy, Maggie, Aquitaine, Teresa Thomas,

    Forgive me for addressing this to more than one, but this really applies to all of you and me too for that matter. I think I am “prodromal” today….

    Anyway, many people use the term migraine “hangover” after they’ve had an attack. It may actually be postdrome, of the last phase of a migraine attack that can last up to 48 hours. Let me share some information with you on this topic; http://migraine.com/migraine-basics/migraine-phases/.

    Nancy

  • Gabymassey
    6 years ago

    I never thought, when I found this site, that I’d find it to be so comforting, that so many other people feel the same as I do. To most of the other comments so far on here, I just want to add – me too. It’s boring to me and to those close to me that most days I’m ‘off’, though with NY’s summer weather most days recently have been full blown. It’s sad that I know that three weeks ago I had two whole days off – no pills of any kind necessary and no migraine, but that’s the rarity. Or the days that start fine but within a couple of hours of waking up I know one is coming – and come it does.
    So hi everyone – who knew we needed such a big boat?

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    6 years ago

    Hi Gaby!

    It really is validating to know we are not alone. Migraine, chronic pain and other chronic illness can make us feel so isolated and alone. Most of the time we feel as if we are the only ones who understand what we are going through. Now you have an entire community that understands!

    Western New York has been brutal this summer too. Too hot, too humid and now it is down to 60 degrees and may be dipping into the 50’s. Not good migraine weather!

    Nancy

  • sheri2u2
    6 years ago

    Gaby, It’s nice to know we’re not alone. But on the other hand it’s awful that so many of us have to go through this. Those
    “in between days” that become the norm are exhausting.

  • Joe Hard
    6 years ago

    This is my first post been following since my concussion.I slipped on ice in january and hit the back of my head and passed out and hit the front of my head a month later. Had bad vertigo which vestibular therapy fixed.Ive had migraines for 6 months now a day to 4 days and i just had one and I feel like a zombie after. Tried several migraine meds ,relpax,sumatriptan,treximet but nothing helps,went for neuropsyc test and said I’m processing slow and need a pain clinic. tried but none take comp so waiting for comp to get my results but the times not with the migraine are just as bad I feel drunk and evry thing is in slow motion so I hear ya about the inbertween times

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    6 years ago

    Hi Joe,

    I’m sorry you are going through this, but so glad you posted. I know how difficult it is because I’ve been where you are and continue to have issues from a fall that resulted in a TBI in 1996.

    If you don’t mind a suggestion, I would strongly encourage you to find a concussion clinic and/or a doctor who specializes in concussion asap. Depending on where you live, one may not be hard to find. Had I known such a thing existed all those years ago, I might be in a different spot today.

    Nancy

  • Marcia Lundy
    6 years ago

    Funny , I am experiencing one of those days now. I feel very out of it, would describe the feeling as vague, I feel like I should be doing something. Started a couple of easy projects, straightened up a bit. I don’t feel like interacting with anyone right now. I tried to lie down for a nap, but I am not feeling that either. Your post really hit home today.

  • afinkel
    6 years ago

    That’s really interesting. This is the first time I’ve read a post about not feeling like interacting. That’s exactly how I feel when I have one of my not-so-bad headaches and also when in recovery mode after a migraine. I just don’t want to make the effort to be sociable. It’s too hard.

  • Stacie
    6 years ago

    I am newly diagnosed with migraines (after having them for a long time and they had progressively gotten worse). I’ve been doing a lot of reading on them lately since being officially diagnosed and having started figuring out which meds work/don’t work, going through test and all that fun stuff. And also because I’m having all these things that I thought were “weird” and didn’t really have any one who understood to talk to about it! So glad I found this site and this article definitely describes many days I have, like today!! People will ask me how my headache is and I tell them fine, because, well I don’t feel like cutting my head off and I feel like if I try to explain how I feel they just think I’m crazy or I’m just complaining! I hate to know there are other people that are going through what I am but at the same time it’s so nice to know there ARE other people feeling what I am and I’m not crazy!

  • Tim Banish
    6 years ago

    Well it is good to know others have these same days of in-between. I’ve had one the last few days too. Like a 1 on the migraine scale, but if the pain begins to increase I find a OTC pain reliever will usually stop it from going full tilt. On those days I feel slow, clumsy, and forgetful, but still happy it’s not an all out attack.

  • mast610
    6 years ago

    Thanks for addressing this. I get these days when I’m not quite “sick” but kinda stuck in place. People think if you’re not in agonizing pain you should be “well”.

  • Rene'
    6 years ago

    Ah, the ‘tween days. I know them well. Extremely frustrating. Not “sick” but not functioning on all cylinders. Hard to explain to people that I am not in pain, but I am in migraine, still a disruption in my neurology.

  • Amy Layman
    6 years ago

    had one of these days yesterday and it developed into a mild migraine…Funny how I was thankful that it was “Mild”…What I was not thankful for is that I was dropping my daughter off to camp and we had a 2.5 hour drive and she was excited, nervous and talkative and all I keep wishing for was for her to stop talking 🙁 I tried to be engaging but then sometimes I could not concentrate on what she was saying so I would have to ask her to repeat it. She finally asked if I was getting a headache… sigh…I am so sick of these migraines….23 years and they are more fierce now than they were when they started….so back to the neurologist for a re-evaluation…
    so very tired 🙁

  • Dawnita (hollis)
    6 years ago

    I feel the same way with my daughter in law and granddaughter who live with us right now. I don’t know if it is the higher tone of their voice or what, cuz grandson, son, and hubby’s voices don’t bother me..but then they don’t continue yammering like the girls do…
    How do you say “I Love YOU, now PLEASE….Shut UP!”

  • afinkel
    6 years ago

    Oh my, I hear you! I’m so very very tired too of not having any predictable relief. I also understand about not wanting to talk or listen and wanting the other person to simply stop talking. Peace and quiet – that seems to be my primary goal these days. I just need to get away from all the noise.

  • sspeight
    6 years ago

    YES!!! I still don’t know how to handle them. I think it’s partially due to all the medicines that they have us on. I’ve been that way for the last 4 days. Not bad pain but definitely not 100%. I have a heck of a time trying to explain how I feel to people. Heck, I don’t know that I understand it myself. I guess you just manage and do your best. Or maybe people have much better ideas than me because I’m still in a fog.

  • Linda K.
    6 years ago

    Oh yes! I’m glad to hear others have days like that, too. The other day, as I was taking my morning shower, it just felt awkward, like I wasn’t quite sure the shampoo was in the “right” place. Then my grandchildren, who were visiting, woke up earlier than I had planned and, of course, immediately wanted my attention. I burst into tears! So very frustrating. There was no rational cause for that at all! I later explained to them that when I have a headache day, my brain just doesn’t work right and I might do or say crazy things. They seemed to understand. I did develop a headache later. It wasn’t the worst, but it was definitely there.

  • khwaters
    6 years ago

    I experience these frequently. It makes me feel better to know that others do, too, because I start to feel like maybe I’m just “pretending” or “imagining” it after awhile. How else could it be possible that I so often feel, well, not 100%?
    My ways of avoiding a full migraine on these days are: 1.Taking an anti-inflammatory: Nabumatone, Diclofenac, etc.
    2.Taking a serious nap while using an icepack or icemask on all parts of my head that are feeling ‘foggy’.
    3.Taking a cool shower and having the water run on my face and head as much as possible.
    4.If possible, going for a walk or run with music that really gets me feeling good. Sometimes I need a distraction from the fogginess.

  • AmyBabee
    6 years ago

    Funny, we all have these same kind of feelings! Feels like the first time I I got pregnant with my son (didnt understand what was happening to me). Right now, I dont know if I am standing or sitting. I feel like a drunk on the 3rd day of hangover … ‘muggy’ kind of feeling. I keep asking myself if this is how people with serious ‘mental health issues’ feel. I am tired and woozy but no serious head pains and not quite myself either. Could it be due to the effects of those pills we ‘snack’ on at all times of the day. I am so paranoid about getting hit with the migraine, that any smallest twitch sends my heart racing…am getting it now? How hard will it hit this time and for how long? My preventive is always with me even if I was going down the nearest bodega for something. I just lie down and close my eyes praying frantically to God to spare me this time around, again! I am so glad the pain has not hit, yet. I will take ‘woozy’ anyday than the pain. I am with you girrrl.

  • Shelly7200
    6 years ago

    Absolutely! These are good descriptions for what I feel on those in between days, too. The most frustrating for me, since I’m a therapist, are the “word search” problems. It is frustrating to have trouble with language when your job centers on using language, and using it well. I feel “foggy” on those days and sometimes just generally achy — rather than sharp, focused, goal-oriented. I’m just floating through as if I were drugged a little bit. And this is without any drugs… But the worst is feeling like maybe I’m just imagining it or making it up or complaining about a “normal experience” even though I know it’s not normal for me. The self-doubt and lack of self-compassion when I’m sick or not quite right is the worst part for me.

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