Three Rounds of Botox May Be Necessary to Get Relief

If you tried one round of Botox and it wasn’t effective for you, you may still get relief after having a second or third round of injections, according to a recently published study. The study reviewed the experience of 688 people with chronic migraine who tried Botox.

Reduction in the number of headache/migraine days: After the first round of injections, 49.3% of patients had a 50% or greater reduction in the number of headache/migraine days during the 12 weeks the treatment lasts. Another 11.3% had success following their second round of injections, and 10.3% did after the third time they received Botox.

Reduction in the cumulative hours of headache/migraine: 54.2% of the original 688 also reported a 50% or greater reduction in cumulative hours of headache/migraine. 11.6% reached that level of relief after their second round of injections and another 7.4% did after their third round.

Headache Impact Test (HIT-6) score reduction: In addition, 56.3% of patients had a their Headache Impact Test score reduced by five or more points. After the second injection cycle, an additional 14.5% had that degree of improvement, and 7.7% of patients did after the third.

Although doctors and patients have been aware of the possibility that more than one round of Botox is necessary for relief, it’s helpful to have a study supporting this notion. It will help more doctors learn how to use Botox most effectively and can help convince reluctant insurance companies to cover the expensive treatment.

Before your first set of injections, talk to your doctor about the possibility of trying two or three rounds of injections before deciding Botox doesn’t work for you. Even if you don’t notice an improvement in your first or second cycle, you should keep to the 12-week schedule for frequency. Having your doctor (and insurance company) onboard ahead of time will save you some hassle (and possibly money) in the long run.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.
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