How is migraine without aura diagnosed?

Migraine FAQs: How is migraine without aura diagnosed?

Commonly used guides for determining if a patient is suffering from migraine comes from the International Headache Society (IHS). The IHS states that patients who suffer from migraine without aura meet the following criteria:

A. Patient experienced at least five attacks that meet the criteria, B through D, listed below

B. Head pain lasting four to 72 hours (untreated or unsuccessfully treated)

C. Head pain with at least two of the following four characteristics:

    1. Unilateral location (pain on one side of the head)

    2. Pulsating quality (head throbs)

    3. Moderate or severe intensity (inhibits or prohibits daily activities).

    4. Pain is intensified with walking up or down stairs or performing similar physical activity

D. During headache, at least 1 of the following must occur:

    1. Nausea and/or vomiting

    2. Photophobia (sensitivity to light) or phonophobia (sensitivity to sound)

E. At least 1 of the following must apply:

    1. History, physical, and neurologic examinations do not suggest another disorder

    2. History, physical, and neurologic examinations do suggest another disorder, but it is ruled out by appropriate investigations

    3. Another disorder is present, but migraine attacks do not occur for the first time, soon after the disorder

Diagnosing migraines can be tricky, particularly since there's no specific blood or saliva test for it. Keeping a record of your symptoms and finding a doctor who specializing in treating migraines is the best course of action.