Chronic Migraine: The Body’s Slow Leak

Chronic Migraine: The Body’s Slow Leak

Although most people think of migraine as happening in the head alone, the condition causes challenges on many fronts, including a flu-like drain on energy. It can be helpful to acknowledge and plan for the comprehensive way that migraine takes a toll on the body and to seek opportunities to restore and refuel those empty reserves.

Drip…drip…drip…

The energy of a chronic migraineur is frequently being confronted. The challenge may come directly from the pain, or in the effort required to manage the onslaught of triggers –sensitivities to light, noise, smells, stress, and more. It’s as if we are knights in a swordfight, fending off enemy after enemy who are encircling and enclosing upon us. No rest for the weary. Indeed, it is exhausting. The constant pain is like white noise constantly playing in the background.

Running on empty

The analogies about how chronic migraine takes a toll on our energy are endless. We feel like a:

  • car that has run out of fuel
  • tire with a slow leak
  • car running on fumes
  • balloon running out of air

No matter the image that suits you best, the underlying dynamic remains the same: chronic migraine is draining. It’s important for us, as migraineurs, to make room in our lives for the very real impact that migraine has on our energy.

The drain on our energy can happen before, during and after a migraine attack – making it a well-known pro- and post-drome symptom. For many of us, lethargy is the first sign that a migraine is coming. It goes without saying that during an attack, we are incapable of being active. And, for many, after the migraine lifts, there is the sense that we are moving through molasses. Each action feels as though it takes extreme effort.

Long after the pain dissipates, the after-effects of a migraine attack can continue to wreak havoc on our lives. Indeed, for most chronic migraineurs, the postdrome symptoms become entangled with the prodrome symptoms before the next attack hits until the entire month becomes one long haze of symptoms and pain.

Conserving what’s left

With all that is challenging and confronting our energy reserves, what we have left is precious and must be guarded with care. A first step in that process is to simply acknowledge the fact that there is a constant drain on our system. With that knowledge in hand, we begin to think more carefully about ways to take care of ourselves; to make a conscious effort to inspire new energy. Partaking in the types of activities that nourish and rebuild us in our windows of wellness are of utmost importance.

Refueling

The moment we feel a lift in pain, on comes a rush of anxiety regarding all that’s been left unattended. Unfortunately, that anxiety may be accompanied by a surge of stress, which can trigger another attack. Better to take a breath and use that moment to do something for ourselves. A walk, tea with a friend, whatever it is- something that refuels.

Is energy-loss a part of your migraine-cycle? What are the ways that you recharge? Share your approaches below so we can learn from each other!

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

View Comments (107)
  • vshaynes
    1 month ago

    You explained things exactly right. I’ve used the same analogy about the post-drome feeling of molasses and the term lethargy which is more than just being tired.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    4 weeks ago

    Glad this article resonated with you. Yes, the molasses image is certainly fitting. And you’re so right, tired doesn’t quite ‘get’ it. Just like the term headache doesn’t describe “migraine”!

    Thanks for chiming in. Please stay in touch. So glad you’re a part of our community.

  • GSDmom
    2 months ago

    I have severe energy loss with a migraine attack. I do art and crafts and attempt to read but I also try to take B vitamins and Mg too to help replenish the actual energy for my cells that the mitochondria use up while fighting the pain. A sports drink helps with that too as well as trying to consume a sugar source and a salt source to rebalance electrolytes. Once I get that back in balance, the energy does return slowly but surely.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 months ago

    Thank you for sharing your tactics for replenishing your empty reserves. I too, take to arts and crafts when I’m down for the count. Doing so serves to distract and give, instead of take… https://migraine.com/living-migraine/getting-creative-chronic-migraine-workarounds/

  • Jonathondroberts
    2 months ago

    Honestly I get how this can be a constant drain, I’ve suffered from chronic migraines since I was about 6 years of age. I was once prescribed with a prescription when I was about 10 because it was that debilitating on me, but the prescription back then had such bad side effects, it made me irritable and moody, I often cussed at my parents which was unlike me at that age. The medication I also took alot of energy out of me, as soon as I’d get home from schoo I’d sleep until the next day or until dinner, then sleep after dinner, my parents finally took me off that medicine when I was about 13. Fast forward to today, I don’t have insurance so I self medicate with Excedrin Migraine, I take the daily recommended dose, twice daily, if I don’t keep that up in plagued with migraines again. I’m destroying my liver but if I don’t do this I can’t have a normal life. I know there are diseases that kill people, but I just wish they knew about the key factors so I could have a normal everyday life, I have 3 kids and hope none of them have to go through what we have to go through.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 months ago

    You bring up so many important and common factors related to migraine in one fell-swoop! First, the way that our medication’s side effects can sometimes be worse or just as bad as the migraine attacks themselves. Second, the challenge of insurance, or lack thereof, when migraine medications are so expensive. Third, the hard choice between a medication that works vs. the long-term impact of that medication on our bodies. And lastly, the worry about passing along migraine disease to our children. So many challenges we all face. Thank you for sharing. What a powerful comment.

  • Shaggy78
    2 months ago

    I’ve suffered from migraines my entire life. I also suffer from severe TMJ clench my teeth CONSTANTLY. This causes daily tension headaches as well. My migraine disease turned chronic 15 years ago at the age of 25 and could no longer hold down a job by the age of 28 so I was forced to go on disability after having been fired from two consecutive jobs for missing too many days at work. I have also been diagnosed with Occipital Neuralgia when I began to have searing nerve pain travel from the base of my neck, up and over the back of my skull and directly into my right eye (which is the same side affected by my migraines). I often have trouble determining which type of headaches I am suffering from. Certain medications help migraines but do not touch tension headaches or the nerve pain from Occipital Neuralgia. An entire decade of my life has passed me by. Luckily, I finished college before the pain turned severe but I have not been able to date and friends have slowly disappeared, one by one. If I can’t take care of myself I can’t possibly give 100% to another person. This disease is so isolating and lonely. This website has has helped me feel like Inam part of the world again.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 months ago

    Hi Shaggy- It is so good to hear from you – and wonderful to hear that migraine.com has helped reconnect you with the world. It is stunning to realize that there are 36 million people in the US who are living with migraine. Many of us navigating the isolation you describe– having been sidelined from our careers early on, managing severe pain and other symptoms every day that make contact with the outside world a real challenge.

    Your case does sound as if it has an extra dose of complication as you are juggling several different conditions (as if migraine weren’t complicated enough!). I often feel, at the end of the day, that my entire day was spent responding to my symptoms. Day after day, our hands are full with self-care – and before we know it, a decade has passed. But that doesn’t mean it was a decade wasted: https://migraine.com/living-migraine/the-accomplishment-of-making-it-through-a-day-with-a-migraine/

    So glad you’re a part of our community! Please stay in touch.

  • Jean-Marie Kingsbury
    3 months ago

    I feel as though life is passing me by. I have had migraines since the age of three. I am now Sixty-three.
    Ten years ago I developed Chronic Daily Migraines. I am either hyper-activity to medications or the medications don’t work. I am excited and petrified to try the newest medications. I am on
    Medicare.I don’t know how I can pay for the new medicatons.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 months ago

    Hi there, Jean-Marie. We sound quite similar. I have also had migraine for most of my life, with mine transitioning to chronic 10 years ago. Like you, I had enormous trepidation about trying the new treatments. What if they worked and I couldn’t afford them?

    I tried Gammacore and initially had a good response, but it wasn’t lasting for me. I’m almost relieved because my insurance wouldn’t cover it.

    I’m on my second dose of the Aimovig and I am noticing a difference. It’s not as dramatic as I’d hoped. I have low/moderate pain at all times with specific migraine attacks 3-5 times a week. The Aimovig seems to have decreased those marked attacks down to 2-3 times a week but hasn’t touched the constant pain (which I believe is related to the the prodrome and postdrome symptoms that I’m experiencing due to the frequency of the attacks).

    I’m not complaining, as with fewer migraine attacks, I’m having fewer bouts of nausea and vomiting and spending less time in bed. However, I think I had my hopes too high that I would “get my life back”.

    That’s not been my experience. I also have no idea what will happen after this month in terms of whether or not I will be able to afford this medication as these two months have been part of a free trial offer. So, it’s a bit terrifying to know that the lift I have experienced may be temporary.

    All this to say, you’re not alone. Perhaps it’d be helpful to keep your expectations realistic (or even low)- and be sure to explore free trial options. Lastly, let us know of your experience. Thinking of you and so glad you’re a part of our community.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 months ago

    Hi again @mrsmimoo! – I found your treatment regimen! Thank you! So glad you found a combination that works for you. Thanks for sharing.

  • MrsMiMoo
    2 months ago

    Migraine since I was 9. Chronic since my 30s. Now would have migraine 20 days out of 30 without preventative and Sumitriptan for acute. Currently on Candesartan 24mg a day for preventative in conjunction with awful Topamax 50mg twice a day. Topamax makes me unable to get words out and has removed half of my hair, but the two together do seem to work as I have now gone down to 8 days of migraines (life is now sustainable). I am unable to get Ajovy prescribed for another 5 years on the UK health service as it is a rationing service. However, holidays are impossible as I cannot plan one as I cannot be sure i won’t be ill. I can only work as that is essential to avoid losing my house!

  • SPupp
    3 months ago

    I have not yet found a good way to recharge. Exercise is limited not only by exhaustion, but by pain – anything that involves moving of my head is painful. I had to give up ballroom dancing with my wife. I know it is just a matter of finding something I can tolerate, but the degree of exhaustion severely saps my motivation.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    3 months ago

    Hi there, @SPupp, you are not alone in being between a rock and a hard place when it comes to exercise. Many of us have been told by our doctors that exercising will help reduce the frequency of migraine attacks, but finding a mode of exercise that does not exacerbate pain is easier said than done. Here are a few interesting articles we have on that very topic that I hope you’ll find useful:

    https://migraine.com/blog/you-should-exercise-more/

    https://migraine.com/video/exercise-treatment-or-trigger/

    https://migraine.com/living-migraine/resisting-the-urge-to-curl-up/

    I’m so sorry you’ve had to give up ballroom dancing as it sounds like a wonderful way to both exercise and spend time with a loved one. If you find a successful fit – please come back and share it with us so we can learn from you– because, as I said, you are not alone in this quest!

    So glad you are a part of our community.

  • SPupp
    3 months ago

    Many thanks indeed for the links to the articles! I am very glad to be part of such a helpful, supportive community.

  • cindy1965
    4 months ago

    Yes I feel drained now. It is only on right side of my head feels like a stake is being pounded in my head, my body is just dragging and as far as doing much not a chance

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    4 months ago

    Your description is so apt and such a good visual it reminded me of a recent call we did asking community members to submit descriptors of what their migraines would look like if they were visible. You might enjoy looking at the comment section following this article and adding your own description here: https://migraine.com/living-migraine/what-if-migraines-were-visible/.

    It really is a comprehensively exhausting disease.

    So glad you chimed in and that you’re a part of our community! Please stay in touch.

  • Ash3
    4 months ago

    Workout!

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    3 months ago

    @ayl88joanie– So glad you chimed in! And you’re so right- exercise/a raise in heart rate can really exacerbate pain for many of us.

    You are not alone in this! I thought you might find some of these resources on the intersection of exercise and migraine interesting:

    https://migraine.com/blog/you-should-exercise-more/

    https://migraine.com/video/exercise-treatment-or-trigger/

    https://migraine.com/living-migraine/resisting-the-urge-to-curl-up/

    So glad you’re with us! Please stay in touch.

  • Joanna Bodner moderator
    4 months ago

    Exercise is certainly an important part for some to effective migraine management, but unfortunately what works well for someone may not for another. For some even a slow paced walk is not possible when it comes to being able to exercise. Listening to your body and finding that right balance for you as exercise can sure become a “dance” of back & forth & figuring out what works best for each individual (if it does at all). -Joanna (Migraine.com Team)

  • MrsMiMoo
    2 months ago

    For me exercise is a trigger – I can only walk as it is a change inblood pressure that will give me a migraine. walking for 3 hours is good exercise for me.

  • Ayl88joanie
    3 months ago

    Thank you Joanna!

    It only takes a few minutes and my head starts to feel bad, unable to focus and if I don’t stop a migraine will start.

  • njr008
    5 months ago

    This article is me all over. Lately everything is just melding one into the other. The aura 24 hours before the migraine, the migraine itself and then the aftermath which can last a week or more. I have been at this for twenty years since I was 19, and the last two years have been the worst. People at work don’t really understand how I can function and do my job; which is teaching maths and science to high school students. They cannot seem to understand that putting pressure or unrealistic expectations does not help, and I have no time to make time for myself. I need all the support I can get.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    4 months ago

    I love the way you are able to articulate what you need and don’t need. It’s so true that we need support, not pressure. Compassion is absolutely key but can be very hard to come by, unfortunately as so few understand what having a migraine attack is really like to experience. I hope when you say that people at work don’t understand how you function at such a high pressure (and noisy!) job, it’s because they are in awe of the fact that you make it through the day at all! It really is a feat that you do what you do with migraines on board. Just thinking about the noise, the deadlines, the demands of teaching while navigating the complex neurological disease that is migraine- makes me stressed out!

    Sometimes it can help to forward articles that resonate with you to coworkers, friends and family members as a way to shed light on the complex nature of migraine. Raising awareness about the disease among your support system may result in an increase in compassion. Also, please remember that you are among a large community here of compassionate people who know what you are up against. We understand and are here to provide support, camaraderie, and information anytime. So glad you are here with us. Please stay in touch.

  • PEINURSE
    5 months ago

    I have just found this site and, what a relief, I could cry. I thought I was going crazy!! I have had migraine since 11 years old and am now 47. I decided as a teenager that, if I missed work or school every time I had a migraine, I would never be able to function in life. So, yes, I pushed through for many years of episodic migraine. I too have tried everything that has been offered or suggested by medical practitioners as well as the holistic health community. I am passionate about my career as a geriatric RN, working in a clinical education role in a long term care facility. Finally, yesterday, I had to succumb to all the pain and drain and take a sick leave. This is very upsetting for me. I am so happy I have found this site as everything I have ever experienced and am now experiencing, is described here. I am not trying the ” no medication” to see if the rebound effect is am issue for me. So, I will need all the support I can get.

  • MrsMiMoo
    2 months ago

    I was really pleased to find advice and people who had similar experiences. Do try different preventatives. It has taken me 30 years to find one that works. There may be one that works.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 months ago

    Can you share with us the one that you finally found that worked for you? Always lovely to hear a story that gives hope! Thanks @Mrsmimoo!

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    5 months ago

    Hi @peinurse– So glad you found us! Welcome! You are in no way crazy! What a long journey you’ve been on with migraine navigating this complex neurological disease with what sounds like little to no support. Migraine is the 7th leading cause of disability worldwide which illustrates the serious nature of the condition – so muscling through it is sometimes just not possible to do. Despite your tremendous work ethic, I guess I’m trying to say that it’s alright to let yourself off the hook when it comes to a sick day here or there as the condition can truly be debilitating. We are with you as you explore the rebound effect and take a break from medication. Please know we are always here to provide support and information. If you haven’t already (and if you are active on facebook), please check out our facebook page- we’ve got a nice exchange with our community there as well. https://www.facebook.com/MigraineDotCom/ . Stay in touch!

  • MrsMiMoo
    2 months ago

    I have a regime of no alchohol at all, regular sleep pattern. No nitrates in food. Avoid smells like cigarettes and pefume. Avoid emotional flooding (as much as is possible) avoid blue screens. Avoid reading screens late at night. avoid hot sunshine. avoid changes in pressure (i hate flying). Have a routine. What a boring person I must be!!!!
    Have some fun but know your trigger points. Carry sumitriptan and stay hydrated. Eat regularly and eat low carb mediterranean diet. My neuro says that the thinner you are the less likely the migraines are – so keep weight down if you can. A blood sugar diet is important. These are my migraine top tips.

  • MrsMiMoo
    2 months ago

    Preventatives that worked for me: 150mg of topamax split in half over the day combined with a single dose of 32mg of Candesartan once a day seems to be holding off the migraines. I am not sure how long it will last but so far 6 months and holding and that included the death of my father which was very stressy. I want to try the new injection preventative but UK healthcare will not cover this for at least five years…….. Lucky for me sumitriptan works well as an acute treatment so all in I can now function as a chronic migraineur. I would say I have tried over the years : Proprananol, Amyltriptyline, Pizotifen, antidepressants, in cycles and none of them worked at all. Topamax on a high dose was good on its own for migraine, but the side effects were ruin (stomach upsets, hair loss neurological effects), so I now have a low dose in combination with Candesartan. Good luck to all.

  • Jlevy
    5 months ago

    It’s nice to see a post about this phenomenon, which only became a serious part of my migraine syndrome in the past three years. I had my first migraine when I was 8 years old. I am now 61. During my life I have experienced different manifestations of this condition including: migraine with aura, without aura, ocular, hormonal induced, chronic intractible, and a form that responds to indomethacin. I am never without pain, the question is how much. Like most migraineurs, I power through. Most people in my life don’t know “how I do it.” The slow energy drip phenomenon, or what I would describe as a full body migraine is relatively new. The head pain might have subsided, but I am physically unable to move, as if I have been stricken with the flu. My body is completely heavy, dead weight. Getting up to go to the bathroom is a real effort. I cannot visualize taking a shower or following through on any daily activities. This lasts two to three days. The only medication I take for sever attacks is indomethicin and if nausea is severe, promethacin. I don’t take opioids, and the triptans stopped working ages ago. I thought this manifestation was due to “getting older”and just being tired out, and less resilient; perhaps something else is at play.

  • MrsMiMoo
    2 months ago

    THere have been times when I have got home and gone to bed fully clothed and shoed, and just led there, waiting for oblivion. Or just sat in a chair and stared at the wall waiting for the Sumitriptan to work.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    5 months ago

    Hi @Jlevy– I’m glad this article resonated with you and validates your experience. Thanks so much for chiming in. What a long journey with migraine and interesting to hear of the way this phenomenon has evolved for you. I, too, manage a fairly constant pain, just a matter of level. The energy drain can be a lot to manage atop the pain, as you describe. Glad you are a part of our community. Thinking of you.

  • Nikita212
    5 months ago

    I do experience lots of energy. I was thinking that, along with a Chinese, may be fibromyalgia.

    Whatever it is, it’s depressing after an attack. Fortunately, my migraines have been reduced in both intensity and frequency lately.

    I’m a chronic migraine and they dropped from 19 a month to13 a month. To me, that’s progress!

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    5 months ago

    That IS progress. Glad to hear you’ve been experiencing some relief in the way of severity and frequency. Is there anything to which you can attribute this change? Thanks for sharing– it’s always inspiring to hear about the improvement of others.

  • jazzygirl23
    6 months ago

    Thank you for putting into words what people with chronic headaches and migraines feel and go thru every day of our lives! As I have learned, many people that have not experienced what we go thru have no clue what it is like and, worse yet, no empathy. For me, this has included close family members and employer. This will be great for others to read to get a better understanding. After 25+ years of a stressful career in the insurance industry, I resigned and it was the best thing I ever could have done for myself and my health.

  • PEINURSE
    5 months ago

    I have great empathy from my family but I fear my husband will soon tire of this.
    I feel my employer does not understand but, they have been supportive so far. I just had to decide to take a sick leave yesterday so I will have to see how the support goes. However, I am protected by a union so that helps as well.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    5 months ago

    @PEINURSE and @monicamdye11 – here are a few articles on the topic of navigating migraine with significant others that might be of interest:
    https://migraine.com/living-migraine/navigating-with-your-partner/

    https://migraine.com/blog/tips-to-manage-impact-on-marriage/

    And here is a link to our articles on addressing migraine with your employer:https://migraine.com/?s=employer+

    Hope those help. Please let us know if there’s more information you’d like on these topics or anything else. Stay in touch!

  • monicamdye11
    5 months ago

    I too am nervous my long term boyfriend will grow old with my migraines – and my employer isn’t very understanding either.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    6 months ago

    I’m so glad this article resonated with you. I hope you will forward it to others as a means of increasing their understanding of what you’re navigating.

    It sounds like you made a great decision in closing a stressful chapter in your life by leaving a stressful job. Congratulations! Have you found your overall health and sense of wellness has increased as a result? Have your migraine attacks decreased in frequency and severity? Amazing when we are able to remove a primary trigger. Thanks for sharing your inspiring story!

  • 4jene4
    6 months ago

    I definitely have less energy and my mind just doesn’t function at 100%. I feel like I’m in a fog. I can’t process things quickly. I am soooo tired of migraines!

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    6 months ago

    You are so right! Exhaustion is a major side effect of migraines and it is exhausting to HAVE migraines! On top of the severe pain and other symptoms, the inability to think clearly is maddening.

    You are not alone. Glad you spoke up and that you are a part of our community.

    Keep in touch!

  • RonnDula
    7 months ago

    Yes. In fact, I find the energy loss debilitating. Often, all I can do after a migraine is sleep, sometimes as much as 12 to 14 hours at a stretch.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    7 months ago

    The gut punch to the energy is indeed overwhelming. It sounds like your body is asking you to take time to recharge after it’s been depleted. Glad you shared what happens for you as I’m sure others can relate. Stay in touch!

  • MaryE81711
    7 months ago

    A trip to the movies almost always is rejuvenating for me. Napping with my cat.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    7 months ago

    Thanks so much for sharing what has proven to be an effective strategy for you! Now, only if we were allowed to take our pets WITH us to the movies to snuggle up and nap in our laps as we watch. All kidding aside, it really is so important to think carefully about the ways to refill those reserves and prioritize those activities in the days following an attack.

  • PatsyL47
    7 months ago

    Yes, sometimes I notice a tiredness before the pain and auras and sensitivity begins. However, I most often eel the tiredness after the auras, pain, and sensitivities are gone.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    7 months ago

    Hi @PatsyL47, thanks for ringing in on this topic. Your experience is illustrative of the fact that migraine is indeed a comprehensive neurological condition. The exhaustion which continues after the other symptoms have lifted gives a nod to the significant impact of the disease and the corresponding depletion that occurs until we’ve had a chance to refill our empty reserves.

  • SCBoyMom
    7 months ago

    I find it helpful to let my husband know when I’m feeling lethargic or needing a nap. I also find it helpful to take a few minutes for deep breaths and breathing in essential oils (safely!) that currently work to help my energy and my relaxation. I do my best to look at it from the standpoint of “I will be much more efficient and likely get more done if I am honest about how I’m feeling and take precautions.” If I’m doing too much on a “good day”, and I don’t stop to take ANY breaks, or time for myself, I can be looking @ a longer time down for the next attack, versus measuring what I do on good days and still resting on the days when I can get things done.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    7 months ago

    Hi @SCBoyMom – indeed, pacing is key – especially on the good days! So hard to do because of how behind we feel that we fall on our “to do” lists. (https://migraine.com/living-migraine/the-accomplishment-of-making-it-through-a-day-with-a-migraine/). What kind of essential oils do you use?

  • ddkehr
    8 months ago

    I am 52 and have dealt with migraines since I was 7. Over the years the number and severity of them has changed. For more than 2 yrs I have a headache every day, ranging from a 1-2 to a 10+, I have had periods where I have less than 1 per month to periods where I have them every 3-4 days and they last from a few hours to a few days. One thing that has always stayed the same is that after having fought one I have a huge craving for carbs. I work through most of them taking the least amount of drugs possible as none of them usually help.Unfortunately my 22 yo son has suffered with them since he was 7 and was included in a few test groups for experimental meds, none of which helped him.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    8 months ago

    Hi @ddkehr – So sorry to hear about your son’s struggle. I’m assuming, as you’ve been dealing with migraines as well, that he is seeing a migraine specialist. There are some new treatments on the horizon – many of us are hopeful about those. If you have time, you might tune into the current Migraine World Summit during which they are discussing those treatments among many other topics: https://migraine.com/news/migraine-world-summit/ . And yes, migraines can really evolve over our lifetimes (if we are unlucky enough to have them for our lifetimes). Interesting to hear about your proclivity for carbs. You probably have already explored the ways your diet intersects with your attacks- but if not, it might be worth doing so. We have a number of articles on the topic, in case you’re interested:https://migraine.com/?s=diet&submit=Go. Thanks so much for chiming in.

  • PEINURSE
    5 months ago

    I live in Canada, are there any migraine specialists accessible here?

  • butterflies
    8 months ago

    It’s embarrassing to say that even after 11 years of migraine I forget that when my body feels like lead the day after a migraine, it’s part of the entire migraine process!! I’ll just continue to plug away, wondering what is wrong with me, until sometime later in the day it occurs to me-duh! It’s the pro-drome!

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    8 months ago

    Hi @butterflies! Yes! Such a good description of what it’s like for so many of us here. Energy drain is not a well-documented or frequently discussed part of the migraine process, so it can be easy to forget the comprehensive and full-body impact migraine can have before and after the pain. When you have that a-ha moment and realize that your lack of energy is related to the migraine, does your behavior change? Do you feel more vulnerable for another migraine during that time? Do you stop what you’re doing and take it easy or continue on with the realization of what you’re up against? Thanks for chiming in!

  • butterflies
    8 months ago

    If I am home, I try to lower my expectations for myself for the rest of the day. If I’m out I just push through, knowing I’ll crash when I return home. ‘New’ fatigue always alerts me to another migraine on the way, at which time I often try to get things done before it hits.

  • hurst8932
    9 months ago

    Can I still ask questions and comment even though I am not over 50? I was not asked for a date of birth on registration so assumed ok to join ?

  • Joanna Bodner moderator
    9 months ago

    Hi there @hurst8932! Of course you can! Only age requirement to our site is that members must be 18 years & older.

    If you have a question/comment related to this article feel free to leave it here or you can also post a question here – https://migraine.com/q-and-a/

    Welcome to our community and sure hope you find the support & information you are looking for! Always feel free to reach out.

  • Jodibug
    10 months ago

    I have had chronic migraine since I started perimenopause 15 years ago. Beta-blockers have helped somewhat, but they don’t help with weather headaches, and I live in Atlanta, GA, the unstable weather capital of the universe.
    The post-drome effects are often worse than the actual headache. I am completely exhausted.
    I have sent this article to my spouse so he can see it’s not just me.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    10 months ago

    Hi @jodibug– Glad this article was worthy of passing along to a family member and hope it worked to help him see that you are one of millions navigating the complications of migraine. I live in NC and know the feeling of the unstable weather patterns that yank us around and toss our migraine attacks this way and that. I have a barometer in my house to help give me a heads up as to when a low is coming…. or a high. Any change, really, causes an issue. One of our contributors moved to phoenix from seattle to get away from the rain and seek respite from the pain of migraine. Here’s her story: https://migraine.com/blog/relocating-avoid-weather-triggers/. Stay in touch- warmly, Holly B. (migraine.com team).

  • Katjolo
    9 months ago

    I also sent this to my husband. He didn’t even read it. I’ve been had chronic migraines for about 3 years and he refuses to believe that not I’m doing this to myself and it’s avoidable if I do this and not that. I wish it was that simple! Any advice to help me get through to my husband of all the effects of chronic migraines?

  • Joanna Bodner moderator
    9 months ago

    Hi there @12x82vi,
    I am so terribly sorry to hear that you are not receiving the support & understanding from your husband. Migraine certainly creates such a tremendous strain and stress in a marriage. Know you are not alone in this struggle. @hollybee may have some personal advice to share, but in the meantime, I thought I would share a few articles that you may find helpful.

    Getting through to your romantic partner
    Are you married or in a committed relationship? Is your partner understanding?
    Marriage and Migraine – The Spouse Perspective
    8 Ways to Manage Migraine’s Impact on Marriage

    I know I have shared a lot of resources with you, but I sure hope they provide you with some helpful information.
    I truly wish you all the best & always feel free to reach out for support.
    Take good care.

  • jrse
    10 months ago

    I have had chronic migraines since 2006 when I received my first traumatic brain injury in a very bad car accident. I received my second, and much worse, traumatic brain injury in 2014 when I was pushed down a flight of stairs. Since my second TBI, my migraines have changed a lot. I had a severe headache every day for a couple years. Finally I was put on some preventative meds and given triptans for acute migraines, I also receive Botox injections, which have helped a lot with the pain, but oddly enough I still get aura symptoms. My aura and pre and post symptoms have changed, too. Now, I am completely sluggish, exhausted, and starving before a migraine, then wide awake after the migraine. So that means I spend the whole day as half a person, then the migraine hits toward night, then I don’t sleep during the night, which can then easily trigger another migraine! And my migraines are often triggered when I am struggling with my brain injury problems, so this happens a lot. It really can be hard to find a time to just feel even okay, if not well.

  • Lee614
    8 months ago

    Sometimes I get that wide awake at night symptom too. I’ll be so exhausted during the afternoon that I have to nap and then wide awake at bedtime. I try to do things that make me sleepy like watching certain tv shows. Thank goodness for HGTV! I also find that eating some carbs help me to get sleepy and having a cool temperature helps me to fall asleep. I hope that you find some relief!

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    8 months ago

    Hi @lee614 – thank you for chiming in with support for @jrse and with some strategies about how to get sleepy! It’s wonderful for the way our community works with people coming forth to provide warmth and guidance.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    10 months ago

    @jrse– thank you so much for sharing some of your story with us. What a complex history you’ve had that has led to Migraine. What you describe of having Migraine treatment that addresses the pain but not the symptoms is something that others discuss regularly on this site. Also, the cycle of one migraine bleeding into another is common – with no real break in between. Exhausting. And I know TBI can really complicate matters. For those of us with chronic daily migraine, it can be very hard to find a window of relief or wellness. We find ourselves just hoping for a day of moderate instead of severe pain, or mild, instead of moderate. The dream of a pain free window begins to feel out of reach. A strange new normal that we learn to navigate. Please know you are not alone in managing this. We are with you and are so glad you are a part of our community. Stay in touch! Warmly, Holly B. (migraine.com team).

  • tjborden
    10 months ago

    I have complex migraines. I also have sleep apnea. My cpap machine really hasn’t helped with the headaches but I do sleep more at night and less during the day. I used to sleep for an hour or so every day. My migraines cause me to have stroke like symptoms and I lose the ability to speak sometimes. Stress is a huge trigger as are smells and light. I got a dog a couple of years ago and she just happen to help me a great deal. I cannot drive any more due to my headaches. So my awesome husband and kids know when my migraine hits me, I’m down for the count. I just started taking magnesium through my neurologist as a preventative. But I’m fortunate enough to be on disability because I have other issues. I also love music so I will try to stick to my routine every day and stay positive. I try to do my work in the morning and early afternoon.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    10 months ago

    @tjborden– Thank you so much for sharing some of your story. It sounds like you have a wonderfully supportive family. So nice to hear that the dog has been helpful. The aphasia (loss of words) that accompanies Migraine for many can be both terrifying and irritating. Magnesium can be a great migraine preventative- as can routine. Glad to hear you were successful in attaining disability, that can be such a battle to secure. It sounds like you are staying positive despite it all, which is phenomenal. So glad you are a part of our community! Stay in touch. Warmly, Holly B. (migraine.com team).

  • songbird09
    11 months ago

    I am a chronic migraineur with an average of 15-20 headache days per month.
    One of the BEST things I have done for myself is to quit my office job and work as a private nanny! No more sitting at a desk all day under fluorescent lights, staring at a screen! I take my charges on walks every day, which really helps me, stay away from screens, have NO work related stress (I already raised five children, so baby noise is not stressful at all) and no snarky disbelief if I am ill! (My bosses are both doctors!)
    I realize my job is not for everyone, but I cannot tell you how much it’s helped my health. FAR fewer and much less intense headaches, and faster recovery.
    Also I make a lot more money, so there’s that.

  • taraceleste
    5 months ago

    I have chronic migraines and like you mine too are about 19 to 24 days out of the month. I can’t work a regular job where I am expected to be there 5 days a week and 8 hrs. a day. I work as a house keeper for a retired criminal defense attorney and he is a real jerk. (To everyone on the planet not usually to me.) I do everything from… researching his cases( he still practices at times to help people out and doesn’t charge them) to feeding his dogs. My job is stressful at times because he thinks the world revolves around him and a few years back he had brain surgery to remove a tumor. So now he forgets everything instantly and gets mean and loud all the time. But he’s a deadhead(grateful dead)hippy person and i tell him he better chill out or I will strangle him!(never would of course. Anyways my point is… I am very lucky to have the job I do because he understands that I suffer migraine attacks almost daily and has even changed his life to accommodate me. One of my triggers is the smoke from incense and he loves burning insense. But if I am working he won’t burn them or he puts them out and opens the house. We are lucky for the jobs we have and I know like with myself, many people voice their opinion that I should get a real job… like my kids who are grown early twenties. But they don’t understand that I can’t work a job that schedules me. I would get fired for missing to much work. And the stress of the obligation would be extreme not to mention that I have very little work history due to migraines. (They started around 5yrs and I am 46 now) wow. Sorry about this life history it was supposed to be just a we have that in common thing. I avoid people so I never get to talk to people who get it. Thanks.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    11 months ago

    @songbird09 – Thank you so much for sharing a unique solution that has worked so well for you. It sounds like you have found an opportunity that provides you with the kind of flexibility and balance that you need. I am impressed you can handle the noise. I have raised children as well, but still find the cries of small children to be hard to take when I’m in the throes of a tough attack. It’s wonderful to hear how this position has given you joy and even improved your health and life balance. Grateful to you for sharing this idea with the rest of us. Warmly, Holly B. (migraine.com team).

  • jmcleod
    11 months ago

    I also have MS, so it is difficult to differentiate between migraine fatigue and normal MS fatigue. I do know that I have horrible mood swings when I have a severe migraine coming on. We have had crazy weather changes here recently (as so many have) and the barometric pressure has caused induced multiple migraines. I had been fine on oral Imitrex for two years; these last few weeks I have gone back to injections.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    11 months ago

    Hi jmcleod- You are definitely not alone in feeling more challenged with the recent weather. The barometric pressure is all over the place and migraine hates change. Having an additional (and very complex) condition to manage atop of migraine must be incredibly challenging. Mood swings are a classic prodrome: https://migraine.com/blog/mood-swings-a-warning-sign/ and for many can help them know that an attack is imminent. So glad you shared. Keep in touch. Warmly Holly B. (migraine.com team)

  • pigen51
    12 months ago

    My wife and I are slowly figuring out that I possibly have early symptoms of CTE. The brain disease that many NFL players end up with. I only went as far as high school football, but I played at a high level and suffered at least 5 major concussions at a time when there were no protocols in place for us. I played a whole game after being knocked out completely. Of course this http://uproxx.it/2BocVnLcan't happen today. I don’t blame my migraine headaches on this alone, as I have a family history of migraine headaches also. But it is a cloud ovey head. I am only 57 years old, and as far as I know, there is no treatment for this yet. I am not afraid, but I am glad that my 2 sons never played

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    12 months ago

    Hi pigen51- Thank you for your comment. I hope you’ve seen that we have some articles on the topic. Here’s one in particular you might find useful: https://migraine.com/blog/chronic-traumatic-encephalopathy-cte-migraine/ . Aside from that, I hope you are working to be fully evaluated by your Migraine Specialist on this front to be sure you are getting all you need as far as what type of treatment is available out there. Warmly, Holly B. (migraine.com team).

  • MittinsRkool222
    1 year ago

    I get migraines ever month one one is ever the same.I keep room dark and ice on head and a spittoon near my bed just incase of tossing my stomach up

  • MittinsRkool222
    1 year ago

    I hate it when my boss just don’t understand how it is when a migraine hits.He thinks I am faking it.
    I threw up on him Over time I kept a pain log and whenI had it full of information. I gave it to my doctor.She found out A medical to help me deal with it.

  • MittinsRkool222
    1 year ago

    Today I felt headache at work

  • Kyky Knight moderator
    11 months ago

    MittinsRkool222,

    So sorry you’ve dealt with so much pain from migraine, I am sending encouragement your way and hope that you are able to find some relief. It can be really difficult to navigate migraine in the workplace, and many of us can empathize with the feeling of not being believed about our experiences of pain. Know that you are not alone!

  • jmcleod
    11 months ago

    Unfortunately, I seem to experience these at work more than anywhere else. I would always panic when I was younger as I felt that the nausea and pain would never be controlled. Now that I am better able to identify symptoms early (a metallic smell, unilateral pain that comes on quickly) I feel better knowing that I have medication to treat the migraine as soon as possible.

  • Kostanca
    1 year ago

    This is me in every word .My life my self my everything is up and down .Im scared I fell empety ,lonely and powerless more and more even I have all the time the suport of my family and my friends.I fell like I’m making them live something I should hide I am not giving to them the best of me but i am trying to do the best of me .Having a chronic migraine it’s not easy to deal with but my kids and my family suport is the biggest strength and reason to stand up after every migraine atack .Every thing is against me ,food ,not sleeping well,weather changing and to many reasons and it’s me against every thing determinate to survive.I have learn a lot during this 9 years and the most important lesson is “Never Give Up”even the worst atack will pass.I am trying to change my way of living without changing the others life .What will happend ?I dont know !!What I know for sure it’s I will keep fight my migraine with all my being.Never give up better days will come .I finde very helpful sharing this !!I am not alone -You are not alone!

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    1 year ago

    Kostanca- Thank you for writing such an uplifting message even while you are feeling down. You clearly have a lot of strength despite all that migraines have asked of you. We are so glad you are a part of our community. You are an inspiration. Warmly, Holly B. (migraine.com team).

  • Kostanca
    1 year ago

    ❤️

  • staubscr
    1 year ago

    It’s important to consider obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) as a cause of chronic fatigue and it is associated with migraine. Talk to your healthcare provider about your symptoms and ask if a sleep study would be advisable.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    1 year ago

    staubscr- thank you so much for offering this guidance to the community as something that is worth exploring. A very good tip! Warmly, Holly B. (migraine.com team).

  • aks868
    1 year ago

    Thank you so much for the article! I find the fatigue to be three-fold: first there is the prodrome exhaustion; then there is the exhaustion caused by the migraine itself; finally, there is the exhaustion caused by the disruption to my sleep pattern. At the moment, I cannot fall asleep without multiple sleep aids, plus the perimenopausal symptoms of night sweats and hormonal imbalances also affect my sleep–which of course can trigger a migraine. It’s a Catch 22. I can’t wait to finally hit menopause but just hope it is a good change and not a worsening of the condition!

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    1 year ago

    Hi Aks2868- thanks so much for joining the conversation. I’m glad the article resonated with you. You are so right that very often the exhaustion that comes post-migraine is compounded by other ingredients- and hormonal shifts are a huge player when it comes to sleep. I join you in keeping my fingers crossed until I’ve cut off their blood supply with hope that the other side of menopause will bring a reprieve or even just improvement in my pain pattern. At the same time I’m terrified it will cause the migraines to worsen. You are not alone! Warmly, Holly B. (migraine.com team).

  • Jojiieme
    1 year ago

    SylvieCDN’s description of a “bag of hammers” describes my head today. They’re beating some bizarre jazz asynchronous rhythm, leaving my jaw shaky, my hands fluttery, my eyes squinty, my stomach nauseous and churning. My balance is way off. Unfortunately, I didn’t realise this *before* I finally ventured outside the house mid-afternoon to run some errands…I filled the car and scampered back home quickly!

    We’re having day 3 or 4 of almost constant rain, with the weekend having been heavy rain and until breakfast today was gale force winds and rain/hail. At 6am, I was in consultation with my drivers as to whether it would be safe enough to run our Aged Care social programs (we decided to cancel the day’s activities), then spent two hours advising Head Office, other staff, participants, etc. I’m glad I’ve had a low-key day.

    I’m snug in my quilt and slipper-Uggs, I’ve had my preventatives and also Zoltrip and maxalon. I need to sit quietly, maybe sleep early. If I wake early I can try some meditation, or listen to some quiet yoga-type music. If I’m still shaky when everything else is back to ‘normal’ then I’ll ease back into a full workload by Wednesday (it’s Monday evening now, in Australia).

    Thank you, all, for our supportive international community. There’s always something to learn here.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    1 year ago

    Hi JOJ- So sorry to hear you’re in the midst of a hard run currently. Sounds like the weather may be playing a role in the cycle. I like how it sounds like you are taking care of yourself with rest, meditation, medication, and other therapeutic approaches. You are not alone and we are so glad you are a part of our community! Warmly, Holly B. (migraine.com team).

  • Marjieoc
    1 year ago

    Part of my prof Rome is often drowsiness to the point of narcolepsy. I’ve fallen asleep reading, watching TV … even driving! (Only one very minor accident, fortunately.)

    Fortunately the episodes are very short, and I take meds to keep me awake. I also drink about 12 oz. of coffee most mornings. If I skip the coffee, I’m likely to get a migraine. Gotta have those vasoconstrictors!

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    1 year ago

    Hi Marjieoc- Thanks so much for sharing. Glad this article resonated with you though NOT glad to hear you fall asleep while driving sometimes! That sounds terrifying and like quite a struggle. Many of us turn to caffeine to stave off an attack at its first sign. I had a friend who said she wished she could have an IV drip of coffee to help with her migraines. Not a bad idea. Warmly, Holly B. (migraine.com team).

  • bluebird
    1 year ago

    The sudden abrupt onset of sleep is one of the symptoms that keeps me from socializing and traveling independently. I want to visit family and have to take transport to and from airports from one country to another. Border crossings etc. Afraid I will sleep through a connection or lose ability to think clearly if things don’t go smoothly and I have to think on my feet. I haven’t seen this part of my family in years. so frustrating and makes me sad. Seems to happen in the afternoons even on days when I believe I have slept well.

  • Marjieoc
    1 year ago

    Make that “prodrome” in the first line. Darn auto spell!

  • Scarby
    1 year ago

    This is absolutely me! I begin to feel guilty for leaving the house work to my husband or my work load to my coworkers. My husband continues to remind me that this is not my fault, that I have nothing to feel guilty about. I just wish everyone could be as supportive as he is.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    1 year ago

    Scarby, thanks so much for sharing. How wonderful that you have such a supportive husband. I’ve been thinking a lot lately about the importance of framing this condition as positively as positively. So, just in the way your husband reminds you it is not your fault, I’m working to simply turn away from terms that make Migraine belong to me. My husband and I try to talk about it as “the migraine” rather than “my migraine”. Shifting the ownership off of me makes it something that we both are navigating and affected by together. Sometimes those little shifts can really help. When I have those kind of tips that work with my husband, I try to share those with my friends and family in hopes that they might follow suit. Sometimes others are truly at a loss as to what to say or how to help. We also have several articles about what not to say to people with migraines. https://migraine.com/?s=things+not+to+say&submit=Go These, or other articles from our site that resonate with you, can be helpful to send to friends and families as gentle guides as to what would be helpful to hear. Warmly, Holly B. (migraine.com team).

  • Joleen1966
    1 year ago

    Refueling is huge! It usually takes me a good day of rest 1 day a week to “catch up” on sleep/rest. Every Friday night my husband and I meet with friends, listen and dance to live bands. It’s my bright spot of the week. Suffering with chronic migraine I’m never without pain. Having something fun to look forward to helps me survive. It’s a focal point and makes me feel happy even though I’m suffering. It is very hard to try and be optimistic with all the pain, suffering and depression. If you can find something that makes you happy and have that be your shining star (dimly of course no bright lights for us) which you look toward it might help you too!

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    1 year ago

    Hi Joleen1966, thank you for sharing this great approach. i think many of us (me included) are guilty of waiting for the pain to lift until heading out on the town to recharge. The problem with such a philosophy (for us chronic migraineurs) is that the pain never (or very rarely) lifts – and if it ever does we might live those moments with such trepidation that our actions will trigger more pain. I’m JUST getting to the kind of place you describe of deciding that I need to carve out the same time each week, regardless of how i’m feeling, given that I’m always in some degree in pain, to enjoy time with my husband, family/friends- or else that will never occur. Thanks for providing a healthy example of how to life despite the pain. Warmly, Holly B. (migraine.com team).

  • IcePackHead
    1 year ago

    Hello folks,
    I was pleased to find this article after searching “migraines and fatigue” in google. My migraines started as a teenager as part of my menstr. cycle. – I inherited them from my mom, and now my teen daughter has them too. The headaches where painful for me- but now that I am approaching menopause, they are accompanying extreme fatigue. I found some comfort in knowing that I am not the only one. And I wonder if the symptoms will decrease once I pass through menopause. Also has anyone had luck with Cefaly- electric stimulator device?

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    1 year ago

    Hi IcePackHead- just wanted to chime in to add that when I spoke to an OB specialist on the very topic you raised (will migraine attacks decrease post-menopause) she said that for those of us who have had children, the window during pregnancy can serve as a “tell” for whether or not you will have relief during/after menopause. In other words, if you experienced relief from migraine attacks during pregnancy, you may be more likely to have relief during and post menopause. Conversely, if you experienced an uptick in severity and/or frequency during pregnancy you may have a harder time during/after menopause. I’m certain there is no golden rule that applies to everyone, but I thought it was an interesting tidbit worth passing along. Thanks so much for your comment and glad you found the article useful. Warmly, Holly B. (migraine.com team).

  • DonnaFA moderator
    1 year ago

    Hi IcePackHead (love the name 🙂 We’re glad that you enjoyed the article. Unfortunately, there is no one answer about menopausal changes in the migraine experience. Some people do experience a lessening, but some people also experience an increase in frequency or intensity. We also have tons of discussions around cefaly that you may be interested in browsing. Thanks for being part of this awesome community! -Warmly, Donna (Migraine.com team)

  • mrst53
    1 year ago

    My low energy is more”something the cat drug in and didn’t want”. Of course I have I have fibro too. The post-drone fog and not being able to think is even worse, but I don’t think anyone knows if it is the meds or the headache. Some weeks, I have only one or two and other weeks it’s every day. Sometimes I think my dear Hubby of 44 years thinks I use them as an excuse to get out of housework. He just doesn’t understand.

  • ChronicallyEverything
    1 year ago

    Hi mrst53! I completely understand what you mean when you say your husband doesn’t get it! My own husband of 14 years actually left me 3.5 months ago when I was adjusting to the side effects of a new migraine preventative medication. He assumed I was just being lazy and didn’t take the time to ask what was going on. Of course now he’s super sorry, but I’m not having him back. Help yours understand if he will let you. Maybe talk to a counselor if he’s open to it. My marriage was good until it suddenly wasn’t and it wasn’t anything to do with me – other people, his sisters, got into his ear and convinced him of things that weren’t true. You never know what men are thinking apparently. Good luck to you!

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    1 year ago

    Hi mrst53- So glad you joined the conversation. Managing the condition of migraine alone is complicated enough– add FIbromyalgia to the mix (or any other comorbid condition) and life gets significantly more challenging. Harder still when our partners don’t understand what we’re up against. I’m glad you are a part of our community so you can be reminded that you are not alone in this.

    In case you’re interested, we have a number of articles about the intersection between Fibromyalgia and Migraine here that you can explore here: https://migraine.com/?s=fibromyalgia&submit=Go.

    Additionally, here are several articles on the topic of navigating marriange and migraine: https://migraine.com/blog/tips-to-manage-impact-on-marriage/
    https://migraine.com/living-migraine/navigating-with-your-partner/https://migraine.com/blog/chronic-migraines-impact-marriage-parenting/
    https://migraine.com/living-migraine/migraine-marriage/

    Warmly, Holly B. (migraine.com team).

  • SylvieCDN
    1 year ago

    Great article, Holly! I have not found many, if any, articles about the “flu-like drain on energy” that a migraineur can suffer. For me, it started with telling my boss “I feel I’m coming down with something” only for it to clear up after a day or two at home. The pattern was consistent, and becoming predictable: 7-9 days following menstruation came what you describe. My expression was “bag of hammers.”

    The weighted sensation and feeling zapped of all energy, along with a strange taste in back of nose/mouth with a stuffed nose and head pressure — very much like a cold! — was pronounced and obvious.

    Of course “go see your doctor” yields absolutely nothing. But, there was help among naturopaths, and more holistic views of the migraineur’s physiology, which speaks of inflammation. And — hormonal changes, surely.

    The post-drome of a migraine with the brain fog, neurological limitation and restrict physiological output is very felt right after the attack, once the Imitrex is out of the system, and once a migraineur tries to resume regular physical, social, emotional and mental capacity so soon after a hit.

    But the elongated effect upon a physiology outside of the migraine zone — (or related??) like the flu-like symptoms — could explain more the make up and susceptibilities of a Migraineur to further understand why our brains respond to pain through vascular and neurological changes as they do.

    By the way, I would vocalize my “low energy” to a boss once, and it was turned against me. She was a judgemental woman, who, in my 15 years with the same employer, said she was going to write my doctor for a prognosis of my condition! Harassment to be sure!

    I’m not sure now if it’s wise to say “I’m low-energy.” But with a new boss who discloses that she suffers depression, and who is very understanding of the entire team’s strengths and weaknesses, as long as the work is getting done and well — it seems perfectly acceptable to guide a team member with a heads-up “I’m low-energy today” for feeling exactly as you have described above.

    Cheers!

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    1 year ago

    Hi SylvieCDN, I’m so glad to hear this article resonated with you. Your comment resonates with me as well. I like your “bag of hammers” description as well as the “weighted sensation” you mention. You are correct that there aren’t many articles that reference flu-like symptoms relating to migraine. There are many, however, that speak of brain-fog (https://migraine.com/?s=brain+fog&submit=Go) but I agree, that doesn’t adequately capture the comprehensive physiological exhaustion that accompanies Migraine. Thanks so much for sharing your experience- though I’m sorry to hear about the negative experience with your prior boss. Glad you’ve found a better fit, and perhaps a bit of a kindred spirit, this time around. Warmly, Holly B. (migraine.com team)

  • jvcarrie
    1 year ago

    Thank you for writing this article. After suffering from chronic migraines for nearly 20 years, this is the first time I have read anything about let-down migraines – and this accurately describes what I have experienced all these years. I am so relieved to understand that this is a known condition. All this time I wondered why my energy is zapped after a migraine. Oftentimes my energy is so depleted that the only way to recover is to take a nap. It is exhausting fighting a migraine and sometimes I strangely look forward to the big energy drain, which is indicative that my migraine is almost over.

  • DonnaFA moderator
    1 year ago

    Hi Sylvie, thanks so much for sharing your experience and your very wise words. Your old boss definitely was bordering on harassment, I’m glad you were able to find a better work environment. Sounds like your current work experience is awesome with much empathy and understanding to go around! We’re glad you’re here! -Warmy, Donna (Migraine.com team)

  • Poll