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Loss and Longing

Loss and Longing

Facebook is a catalog of food I can’t eat, places I can’t go, events I can’t attend, and friends I can’t spend time with.” That’s what I told my husband yesterday after I was unable to attend brunch with his mom and aunt. Tonight he has plans with friends. He asked if a meal we have in the freezer is vegetarian in case he and his friends want to eat dinner here. “Yes,” I said, “but you should go out to a restaurant since you can.” Then I burst into tears.

When everything is a trigger

Everything I eat or drink other than water is a migraine trigger for me. Following a ketogenic diet that’s 89% fat, there are nine different foods that only trigger mild migraine attacks. If I eat only those foods, I can be semi-functional at least several hours most days. My meal plan includes eating a stick of butter at every meal with poached chicken breast and one of six vegetables. I keep with this diet because eating anything else means being too sick to get out of bed. But after four-and-a-half years of heavily restricted diets, I’m so very tired. When I explained today’s tears to my husband, I said, “I just want to be able to eat.”

Reminders of what I’ve lost

What I have lost to migraine is looming right now. I try to avoid dwelling on the losses, but they’re in neon flashing lights. Every meal I eat reminds me of what I’ve lost. Facebook, my way of connecting with loved ones when I don’t feel well enough to leave the house, reminds me of how much I’m missing. And my heart aches for a city I love, but can’t live in because the weather is a migraine trigger.

I don’t like living like this. That sounds ridiculous—no one would like having such a restricted life due to chronic migraine. What I mean is that I don’t like living with so much longing. It’s possible to have chronic migraine and not long for what I’ve lost. I’ve learned how and I do it most days. Today isn’t one of them.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • Steph
    2 years ago

    Kerrie and everyone in comments section. Thank you for sharing. The feelings of longing and guilt fromcanceling and “ not being the person i used to be” fit me today 100%. I am supposed to be getting ready to go on an 8 hour drive to my husbands home for xmas and I so do not want to go. Tired , lethargic and know traveling sucks when trying to nanage sleep diet ect ect. Hipe to feel. Etter tom. Thanks steph

  • Yerma
    2 years ago

    Last treatment I tried was migraine surgery. I was better for 6 months and then came back to my old self. Chronic everyday migraine. I’m 67 now. Lately I saw a video of a young person with 30 migraines a month ( i even have more). She started ketogenic diet and has 3/4 migraines a month. I went on different websites. The diet doesn’t seem to difficult. I stopped all sugar, rice ,wheat…low carb but not keto. My cholesterol was a lot higher. I saw there are supplements that help you get in Ketosis and stay there. I agree that 89% fat is too difficult. As a French I like enjoying a good meal and cook everything myself. So did somebody try diet+ supplements? Could it help you Kerrie? Best wishes for the future!

  • countingYesdays
    3 years ago

    Thank you for sharing. Going on ten years with chronic migraine. Not the way I planed to spend my life I am 32 and can’t plan to weeks ahead without worrying that I have to cancel…
    I try to feel my yes-days with every part of my being. So they can shine more brightly than my many off-days.
    I try to do something to others on my yes-day in contrast to taking care of me all the other days. That gives me joy within.
    Thank to all of you in here to make my off-days less lonely

  • 1dejavu
    3 years ago

    Thanks Kerrie for sharing your journey with these headaches. I am so relieved that I am not the only party pooper here. Nobody understands how embarrassing it is to constantly cancel plans. A few gal friends also have headaches but not to my extent. I also fight with fibromyalgia. I feel crippled with pain and depressed and anxious. Medication, I’ve had them all. Nothing works. Trying to rest is impossible for me. I can’t sleep without thinking of all the fun I’ve missed out on over 45 years. Now, I just deal with it, stay to myself and wonder what it would be like to be “normal”. I feel life has passed me by and I’ve never really gotten to enjoy it. I am gluten free and yeast free and eat like a squirrel but keep putting weight on. Now I hate the way I look as well. At least I’m not alone and wish I could help each and every one of the girls get through it. Thank you for letting me vent. Now, I wish I had a donut or two. LOL! That would surely take me over the edge!!!!

  • lmmillette
    3 years ago

    Lots of love coming to you Kerrie, from someone who is grateful that you captured my exact feelings on many many days. In fact, 45 years of migraines!
    I always justified it as “they are from my period and when menopause comes, I’ll be done with this horrible affliction”!. Nope. Didnt happen. Im into at least my 7th year of menopause and still the migraines visit just as frequently. I can analyze and worry and think of the triggers until the cows come home, it doesnt change. So far, as much as I would love say this was a cure or that was a cure there really is no cure. I will say that Imitrex has been my lifesaver. It helps you to not get to that “my worst pain of my life” migraine but Its no cure. Thank you for your article and hopefully there is a really smart neurology student looking for a really puzzling disease to take on and find a cause and cure for! Lisa M.

  • VdeV
    3 years ago

    Dear Kerrie,

    I recently hit a wall with all of the longing and the realization of loss of quality of life over the recent years of migraine suffering. Foods, people, events, days, nature, everything. My teen just left home for college, this past WEEKEND. So about 2 months ago this WALL just knocked me over. I too have eaten ketogenic, though after 7 months of that I had to add back in a few things. My body likes that diet though, but it is BORING, and after all of the other things I GIVE UP…it’s a challenge to stay on it. Yes, I get to eat yummy things, but it does get old to have such a small set of foods to choose from.
    I have just spent the whole of my daughter’s teen years as a full on chronic migraineur. We moved 3 times, the big move was out of our beautiful family house that had a pool and a large bathtub, a place for me to keep my art supplies set up, and nature all around outside while living close to all of the city bonuses. We moved into an urban heat, no bathtub at all. Second move gave me a bathtub, but a tiny one. And like a problem you cite, into a (great) city that is HOT. It sets me up to have more migraines. I want to scream bloody murder for the years that I haven’t been able to be the dynamic mother to my teen daughter. Not only that but then there is my husband who hangs out with others because I cannot enjoy most of the things he loves doing….Some of which used to be my life as well. Many of our beloved friends smoke cigarrettes and pot, which I cannot deal with smelling at all ever. And then several people try to talk me into CBD MJ that will “solve the migraine problem” which I am pretty sure, based on my youthful habits and experiences with the herb itself, that i am possibly allergic to. UGH. Most people DO NOT understand why I visit my old city but don’t make plans because I never know if I have to cancel…I hate to ruin plans. So I make none.
    So my tiny family and I are constantly at odds, because of my inability. Or my ability sometimes when I can do things when medicines do work. IT all confuses them. My daughter has been sweet, but she had to take care of me and that hasn’t been fair. I SO get it, and I’m so sorry too. IT takes everything to be patient with the treatments and the trials of various things. I tried Botox recently and the injections were absolutely hellish, pain for most of the week and then more the following week due to seeing my chiropractor. Really awful. Breathing. Staying calm. Other people deal with their own pains and troubles. Someone I know is dying of cancer, and I think that I’m luckily not in that boat. Also getting off of Topirimate, slowly. That is lifting my mood.

    much feeling and hoping for something soothing for you…a soothing surprise~ V

  • Brooke H moderator
    3 years ago

    Hi VdeV,

    Thank you for taking the time to share your experience. I’m so sorry you’ve been experiencing a worsening in migraine over the past 2 months. It sounds beyond frustrating to try multiple treatments and have little relief. As you shared, migraines can certainly take a toll of one’s relationships – especially those closest like family members. I’ve included a few articles on the topic that I thought may be of interest to you (if you haven’t seen them already): https://migraine.com/blog/practicing-acceptance/; https://migraine.com/blog/family-and-friends-that-do-not-understand-migraine-disease/; https://migraine.com/living-migraine/turning-on-a-dime-and-unpredictability/. Please come here anytime for support!

    Best,
    Brooke (Migraine.com team)

  • MargoW
    3 years ago

    Hi Kerrie,

    I’m so sorry to hear about your migraine troubles. I too have crippling migraines on a daily basis now. I’ve had migraines for 33 years and each year they get worse. I’ve just now gotten my mother to understand. My kids resent me for all of the times I wasn’t there for them.

    I’ve lost nearly every friend I had because of all the times that I had to cancel on them. I feel so isolated and I live vicariously through what my friends and family are posting on Facebook. I lost my job almost 2 years due to too many missed hours. I’m still fighting for disability from the state and short and long term disability from work.

    I’ve tried every preventative medication available, even really old school, and only had Topamax for a few years until I had to quit taking it because of kidney stones.

    Now I live on morphine and oxycodone so I’m always in a fog but my headache specialist has given up with what to do. At least I can get through some days without being completely bed-ridden with migraines but I’m not functional to much of a degree and I often can’t drive. My daughter has a brain injury and I have to take care of her and get her to her doctor appointments because she isn’t allowed to drive. I impose on my ex-husband and my son to take her back and forth to stay with her dad.

    Now my insurance company is beginning to deny me the medications that are abortive and at least make my migraines tolerable like Botox stating that I don’t meet their criteria for coverage which is 14 or more migraines per month. I would think daily migraines for years would be covered but who knows. Obamacare is killing insurance coverage in my state.

    Kerrie, please know that you are not alone. Join some of the migraine support communities on Facebook and here.

  • Brooke H moderator
    3 years ago

    Hi MargoW,

    Thank you for taking the time to post and share your experience living with chronic migraine. I am so sorry you’ve found little relief through multiple trials of treatments and while working with a headache specialist. I do hope your insurance company will continue to cover the ones that are helping (to some degree). We appreciate your kind words of support and encouragement. I am glad you are part of the community here at Migraine.com. Please feel free to post here anytime as well as on our facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/MigraineDotCom/ (if desired). Parenting, in general, with migraine is difficult and I can only imagine the experience with a child with special needs. Many in our community feel guilty about the time lost with children – so much so, one of our contributors wrote an article in support of parenting with migraine that I thought you may appreciate: https://migraine.com/blog/doesnt-bad-parent/. Thank you for being here!

    Best,
    Brooke (Migraine.com team)

  • mrst53
    3 years ago

    Kerrie, I am sorry for the loss you feel. I have suffered with them for 50 years. I feel like you, that I have missed out on so much of life and I still lose days out of the week, between the days of the migraine and the days of the “fog”. My friends I have made here do not understand, because they do not even get headaches. I feel so alone. The temperature changes(I live in VA) and the stress(we are looking to buy a house, and my husband has PTSD from Viet Nam)makes my migraines and the resultant depression makes me feel like screaming, except that would make the headache worse. Just know that you are not alone. There are alot of us out here

  • GA girl
    3 years ago

    I have felt this way struggling with migraines for twenty years that continued to worsen month by month. Finally, I lost my job due to frequent absences, lost my career due to the chronic migraines, and of course the depression then began to worsen!!! I had tried every medication dosage, combination, chiropractic, and acupuncture…the list goes on…until I found the Omega procedure…it may not work for you just like one medication or injection would, but during the trial, I felt no migraine pain for 3 years!!! I have not had the permanent placement yet but I am anxiously waiting with hope now!!! If anyonen is interested in the trial or procedure search me out…

  • MargoW
    3 years ago

    I so want this procedure but I’ve been fighting with my insurance company over it for 3 years now. I went through the trial and it was like heaven but then my insurance retroactively denied coverage and it took about 2 years for them to finally pay for the trial. They still didn’t approve the final procedure and I can’t afford it ($47000 was their cash price for the final surgery 3 years ago).

    Now it’s been so long I have to repeat the trial to be eligible for the final surgery. Always a fight. The cash price for this was 13-14K 3 years ago which I also don’t have.

    Still I’m going to continue to fight with my insurance company and see if I can convince them to allow me to have the surgery. It’s the last thing that promises some relief. The trial showed about an 85% reduction of my migraines, so I know that it works.

    Of course, I live in Arizona and have to travel to Dallas, Texas as that’s the only facility that accepts my insurance. That’s really too bad since they have a local facility about 3 miles from my house 😉

  • Carmela Capellupo-Beaver
    3 years ago

    I would like to know about the Omega Procedure.

  • Joanna Bodner moderator
    3 years ago

    Hi there Carmela,
    We have a summary of some research regarding nerve stimulation (i.e. Omega procedure) in one of our earlier articles: https://migraine.com/blog/nerve-stimulation-research/. Additionally, here is a guide for questions to ask: https://migraine.com/blog/nerve-stimulation-questions-to-ask/. Here is also a link to our forums section where some members have joined in on this conversation.

    Hope this helps you out!
    Thanks for your question & for being part of our community.
    -Joanna (Migraine.com Team)

  • mrst53
    3 years ago

    What is the Omega procedure?

  • Joanna Bodner moderator
    3 years ago

    Hi there mrst53,

    We have a summary of some research regarding nerve stimulation (i.e. Omega procedure) in one of our earlier articles: https://migraine.com/blog/nerve-stimulation-research/. Additionally, here is a guide for questions to ask: https://migraine.com/blog/nerve-stimulation-questions-to-ask/. Here is also a link to our forums section where some members have joined in on this conversation.

    Hope this helps you out!
    Thanks for your question & for being part of our community.
    -Joanna (Migraine.com Team)

  • Sarah
    3 years ago

    I’m so sorry! And I thought my life was rough with migraine. I’ve given up foods with gluten (my doctor and I had tests run that show high thyroid antibodies, aka Hashimoto’s, and decided the best non-medicated treatment for that was this change), which has shown to be a HUGE trigger, food-wise, and I feel it every time I make dinner for me and my roommate and his kids…or we plan to go out to dinner. I take a plethora of vitamins and minerals, or rather it seems like a plethora, which also help to control it. I’m doing so much better than this time last year, which is beautiful, but the restrictions are mind-boggling and difficult. Grocery shopping for the household is no longer a fairly easy and quick feat. Instead, it involves reading and reading and reading labels upon more labels and deciding if I want to take the chance on something that may or may not have hidden gluten. My roommate is one of my strongest supporters, but just last night, he mentioned that sometimes he thinks I’m taking too many things because he doesn’t truly understand, not experiencing migraines himself. My immediate defense was that I really am soooooo much better off taking all the things I take and to remind him of how worried he was for me last year. His concern reminded me of everything I have given up to keep my bad days from being in the majority. It’s rough and I can’t imagine being without this support system here, with people who understand. My heart goes out to you while you cope with everything we want, but can’t have right now. Maybe someday it’ll get better for all of us.

  • 1soro31
    3 years ago

    I thought I was the only one who lives like this!
    I’m so very sorry that you have to go through this. It’s very difficult to watch others live their lives & to feel like you’re on the sideline. My life changed when I got chronic migraines 5 years (& I’m not a spring chicken). I can no longer work, dance, go to movies or restaurants or social events. I can’t exercise. Botox helps a lot but not enough.
    Hang in there. You’re not alone.

  • LAnnSmith
    3 years ago

    Oh Kerrie, I’m so sorry. I really admire you for fighting so hard, but didn’t realize how restricted you are.
    My life has become much smaller to avoid triggers and pain. I guess most of us have this in different ways. But to hear you only have a few things to eat, plus avoiding so many other triggers. Well, I wish I could wrap you in a hug and magically make life better for you, because you’ve made my life better with your writing. Thank you for all the things you learn for us.
    As others have said, we’re praying for you and we care.

  • Jerick
    3 years ago

    Kerrie, thank you for sharing this struggle. You’ve helped me so many times through your writing, this time especially. My relationship recently ended, largely because my ex considered me “flaky” and “unreliable” due to my migraines. He also said dealing with them was “so aggravating” for him, and when I asked for specifics, he mentioned that I couldn’t go out to eat with him as his #1 annoyance. While I felt he was a bit shallow, I also understand the social currency of food and how many of our special moments in life take place over meals shared together. I am so very sorry that you are excluded from this. Please know that so many of us are praying for you, and that you’ve touched many, many lives in this community.

  • Susan L
    3 years ago

    Hi Kerrie, I am so very sorry “today isn’t” a day you can dredge up the enormous coping mechanisms we seriously affected migraineurs need to call upon. However, I had such a horrid week 3 weeks ago, I thought no body like you ever fell down this black hole. I thought you, and other very active moderators here had some reservoir of strength that I don’t have. I’ve suffered for 50 years – no one guesses my age because I appear so energetic and young on those 9 days a month that Botox works – but the rest of the time, for 4 years now, it’s gotten more and more impossible to function. My only hobby, beading, I’m so close to throwing up when the gals meet, I can’t even go. Maxalt doesn’t work half the time anymore. I never take anything more often than I should. I don’t have a life, either. I don’t go anywhere except doc appointments and although I am luckier than others – far luckier – in that I have NO food triggers, I have Chronic Daily Migraine, so waking up is my trigger, and they last all day…except for about 7-9 days a month. I have 1 friend left and can’t leave the house. I can usually stop the tears – but reading your story made me cry for all of us. I go to Miami for my 1st Certified Headache Specialist appointment on Oct. 19. I send a MEANINGFUL cyber hug to all of you.

  • VdeV
    3 years ago

    I wanted to suggest something that when my triptan( Maxalt, Frova, Relpax, and now Almotriptan) stops working I get it switched. Usually it helps massively. If you are lucky and have insurance your doctor will have to get the insurance to agree to switch it. But if your receptors are dulled from one, you must switch! It really will help! At least for a while, until those receptors get dulled. Anyway, good luck. It’s a hard hard road….! I also have about 10 days a month w/o migraine. It’s brutal.

  • 1soro31
    3 years ago

    Susan, my heart breaks for you, as well. I lived like you for quite a while but got a little better. I was in Miami for a bit. There are some good Cert Headache Spec & some not so good. I don’t know if we are able to private message each other on this site or not. If so, I’m happy to provide names of those physicians if you’d like. (If it’s allowed on this site. I’d have to reread our guidelines first).

  • Kelster
    3 years ago

    Sometimes I just want to rage against the air for having to deal with migraines, treatments that only partially help, the exhaustion of pushing through when I “only” have a mild migraine, consistently disappointing people, and knowing others assume I’m healthy and just a slacker in life. I’m very Type A personality so that bothers me more than it might someone else. Of course, there’s no way I could handle all the noise, light, or movement raging at the air would require lol.

    My food triggers and migraines are not as severe as yours, I applaud the fact that you are able to find any amount of acceptance with this disease. I am still struggling to accept they’ve become worse, and that my sheer will power won’t make them go away. I keep working on it though. Thank you for sharing your frustrations and please know you’re not alone.

  • Allison Filek
    3 years ago

    This disease is a bloody massacre. The losses in its wake are too overwhelming to list. I can’t count the number of events that my husband can’t participate in, the things he can’t eat, the places he can’t go or the life we cannot have because of this disease! Migraine might be invisible to the world but the pain and suffering from this disease are very visible to the migraineur and all those affected by it. In our despair, we must hold onto the people whom we meet along the way, people like yourself brave enough to bare her pain to the world, remind us that we are all in this bloodbath together. You are not alone. Keep writing. It’s a lifetime to others who are drowning.

  • RobynG
    3 years ago

    Hello Kerrie and Migraine community. Kerrie, I want to let you know I have suffered from migraines for 30 years. I was diagnosed at 16 and have literally tried EVERY drug on the market, had all different treatments under the sun, saw countless doctors and therapists, and even went as far as having a hysterectomy because I thought the migraines were related to my hormones. I have spent 10s of thousands on my migraines. I too have dietary restrictions and keep getting more and more triggers each year. There is very little I can eat. After losing hope, my neighbor told me about her doctor who is a naturopath. Their clinic heals the body so it can heal itself. I have never heard of the type of medicine they practice until I went. It is working for me and I want to share with everyone who has migraine, this treatment works. I consider myself the worst possible case of migraine and if this doctor can help me, I know he can help others. Please contact me if you want more information.

  • Luna
    3 years ago

    I have gone to 3 Naturopathic physicians without much success. The last one after several months said I probably needed counseling to see why I didn’t want to get better. At least she let me find the same supplements at a better price rather than having to buy everything from her. Courage to all.

  • Soteria
    3 years ago

    Hi Robyn G – with the exception of the hysterectomy, your story is identical to mine. Completely identical. I was sure they were hormone-related but I now know my migraines are tied to my digestive tract. There are no food triggers – just some chemical imbalance that takes place and then we’re off to migraine hell. Vomiting and diarrhea, trips to the ER with dehydration, etc… I need to ask – did your naturopath put you on probiotics? I have found that if I take the probiotics (good ones – not ones from drugstores) I had way fewer migraines. And as I have mentioned here before – I am also in one of the CGRP studies, so my migraines have almost completely stopped – something that I truly didn’t believe was possible. (Yes, fellow sufferers – there is hope). I am convinced that so many of us live with this nightmare disease that and ignorant or uninformed physicians, when there are natural cures. Please share what your naturopath suggested for you.

  • 1soro31
    3 years ago

    I’d love to hear about what he’s done for you.

  • Deb
    3 years ago

    I would love to hear about your experience with a Naturopathic physician! I too have seen one, and my experience was costly, and not a success story! Unfortunately, our insurance company does not recognize Naturopthic physicians, and did not pay
    a dime!! I found the experience costly, and felt I was taking a ton of useless supplements! But, I’m always willing to hear about someone else’s positive experience! I know perhaps mine, was an isolated experience?

  • laurahildebrand
    3 years ago

    I’m sorry, Kerrie. I’m afraid I know very much how you feel. Chronic migraine has stolen so much from me. My husband, my career, my financial independence, my self-esteem, and so much more. My migraines are resistant to any treatment after 2-3 months, and it seems that I have run out of treatments to try. It’s very isolating, isn’t it? Especially when your former friends drop you because they don’t believe it could be that bad and you just need to get out there and soldier on. I’m doubtful at times if my own family really believes how bad it is waking up every single day in pain, sometimes manageable, most times excruciating. I have lost so much and I long for my old life. I would give anything to be that woman who never dreaded every day.

  • migrainemom1
    3 years ago

    I’m right there with you! Sometimes it takes so much energy to explain why I can’t do something, it’s just easier to say no. Often I want to just give up. Don’t go anywhere, have any friends, try anymore. It’s too frustrating!

  • Angel
    3 years ago

    Exactly! I’m so tired of being sick (I’ve had one migraine-free day in the past two months) & the sadness has been really weighing me down lately.

    It took four years battling my insurance to get botox. I’ve now had my first treatment & no change. My doctor says I have to wait til the third treatment (six months fom now) to see results. He didn’t get that I was hoping to restart my life the next day.

    Add in dealing with hateful comments from supposed friends when I’m not able to do what they expect me to.

    I guess its all gotten to me. You definitely are not alone, Kerrie!

  • katdan1026
    3 years ago

    I know exactly what you mean. I moved to a part of the country known for its hiking and outdoor activities, only to develop Migraine Associated Vertigo. I’ve had to give up hiking, climbing, exercising,anything in the heat (hot weather is a trigger for me). I can no longer drive, and even following a migraine diet to the letter it has not decreased the frequency of my outbreaks. I’ve bowed out of social invitations at the last minute so many times because if a headache and/or vertigo I really don’t get invites anymore. Most people don’t understand why you stay so tired, in a brain fog, irritable, and just plain sick mist of,the time. I would give anything to have my life back. But non migrainers can’t understand.

  • wendy
    3 years ago

    I have one person especially I can’t look at her FB posts all the time and because she posts almost every restaurant meal pics – and eats out regularly. Between food allergies and food migraine triggers I have omitted gluten, dairy, honey, fish and selfish, anything with artificial sweeteners (miss chewing gum!), and my go-to gummy bears and like snacks are now also off the list. I can usually get a green salad going out somewhere, but still mourn – and yes, mourn is the word – summer festival food, pizza and much more…but for me, it’s the difference between functional most of the time and being oon disability. Still haven’t found a comfort food left that I can eat. Hang in there!

  • Brooke H moderator
    3 years ago

    Hi Wendy, Thank you for taking the time to share your experience and how you can relate with the post. I’m sorry you have to restrict comfort food and hope that eventually you will find one that doesn’t trigger a migraine. As hard as it is, it sounds as though you’ve found avoiding food triggers to be vital in managing chronic migraine. Please feel free to share here and on our facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/MigraineDotCom/, if desired, for support. Best, Brooke (Migraine.com team)

  • Luna
    3 years ago

    After reading what you get to eat I can see why some days are more difficult to deal with than others. I have days or sometimes just parts of days that are so much harder to keep positive and not just grieve for all the losses. I want to say something …. but can’t think of any right words but thank you for reaching out and expressing what we go through at times. I have finally found that acknowledging grief can be very cleansing emotionally and don’t always just stuff it. “For everything there is a season….”

  • Brooke H moderator
    3 years ago

    Hi Luna, Thank you for sharing your thoughts on the article and personal experience grieving the losses that can come with chronic migraine. As you write, it is ultimately beneficial to feel one’s feelings and grief versus keeping it inside. Please give yourself credit for that insight and practice – it’s not easy! If you’re interested in reading more about one of our contributor’s experience with the grief of migraine, feel free to check out this article: https://migraine.com/blog/the-well-of-grief/. Please share here anytime! Best, Brooke (Migraine.com team)

  • Maureen
    3 years ago

    Kerrie,
    I’m sorry. I know I didn’t do it, but I’m still sorry that you are yearning and longing so. You left a great city and you miss it. You live under lots of restrictions in almost every area of your life. You miss your people and your places and your freedom and yourself. It feels bad. That’s totally legit. I hear you.
    Maureen

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