The Pros and Cons of Invisibility

The Pros and Cons of Invisibility

Living with invisible illness is a constant struggle, and not just because of the illness itself.

Appearing normal

On the positive side, the invisibility of migraine enables those of us with the disease to choose our confidants, the people we tell about our illness. We can go out in public on our well days without weird looks or well-meaning but awkward questions and offers of help. We can appear “normal,” and most of us strive very, very hard to do just that.

Unfortunately, that ability to appear healthy causes just as many problems – if not more – than it lets us avoid.

Lack of empathy from others

The invisible illness that allows us to pretend perfect health also makes it exceptionally difficult for other people to recognize, or in some cases even believe, that we’re ill. This perception that if we look fine, we must feel fine can make it very tough to ask for and/or receive help when we need it. It also often leads to weird looks or rude comments when and if we display disabled plates, get someone to carry our groceries for us, or wear sunglasses inside.

Appearing lazy

When we call in sick to work for the third time in a month due to an illness no one can see, our employers doubt us and our coworkers resent us. Because they can’t see how we feel – the nausea, the pain, the dizziness, the vision changes – they imagine we’re fine. They don’t know how hard we strive to make it in to work and to stay there, even when we feel so sick we can barely think, let alone speak. The invisible aspect of our illness can make us appear lazy, flakey, weak, and/or histrionic.

These perceptions are what we fight against when we push ourselves to finish “just one more” assignment before leaving for the day, even though (on a well day) we’ve already put in 10 hours or (on a sick day) we’re so dizzy and nauseous we shouldn’t be driving, let alone working. They are what cause us to say “yes” when we should be saying “no” – to that social event, to that client meeting, to that extra shift.

Bridging the gap between appearance and the reality

Learning how to balance our realities with other peoples’ perceptions of us – both the positive and negative ones – is part of daily life with a chronic invisible illness. Yes, we get to go out in public without the weird looks and self-conscious awareness of ourselves that people with more visible illnesses and/or disabilities often have to deal with, and I’m thankful for that each and every single well day that I experience.

But, on the sick days – the days when I’m so dizzy I drop every third thing I pick up, the days when I’m in so much pain sitting upright hurts, the days when my vision is blurred to the extent I can’t read, the days when I’m constantly misspeaking and can’t find the right words, no matter how hard I try – on those days, I’d gladly trade the anonymity of invisibility for a little understanding, a little help.

I don’t know how to bridge that gap, yet – the bridge between how I feel and how I look, but I’m working on it. I also hope that other people, healthy people, are coming to understand that not everything is as it appears to be, and that sometimes the only way to know how someone feels is to ask.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

View Comments (39)
  • tjbtaylor9
    1 year ago

    When I finally gave up trying to do my grocery shopping without a handicapped cart, I felt very conspicuous. For a while, I wanted to get a tee shirt with invisible handicap written on it. Because I shop at the same stores in a small town and had enough bad episodes, nobody questions me now.

    I wish I had been able to tell my boss; “I can not do the extra assignments.” I was the “go to girl” that automatically got the extra work. Had I been upfront with him, I might still be working instead of being on disability.

    The key to balance is to treat yourself gently. Say no to ANYTHING that adds extra time to your personal day unless it brings you joy.

    At home, if your house is out of control, start getting rid of “stuff” you neither love nor need. The less you own, the less mess and cleaning you have to do. Always have a few emergency heat and serve dinners, paper plates, cups and disposable untensils on hand.

    If you don’t have a housekeeper and can afford one, hire one to come in every two weeks. That way you can just “pick up” a few odds and ends and your house will always be in control.

    If you have to clean your own home, go simple. The swifter system is fast and easy. They have dusters, even with long handles, sweepers and an easy mop; spray, wipe, toss. There are comparable systems on the market.

    I feel for you. It’s hard being a working woman with migraines. From years of experience, this is my advice: take care of you. Take me time. Do things you enjoy. Find three things a day that bring you happiness. I listen to books on tape when I have a migraine if I can take the noise. They distract me.

    Michael Sealey Sleep hypnosis for pain management on You Tube really helps me. All you do is lay down, relax and listen to him talk. Usually I’ll fall asleep and feel better when I wake up.

  • Sarah Hackley author
    1 year ago

    Those are wonderful tips! Thank you for sharing with the community. I second always having the emergency heat-and-serve dinners on hand. It makes a huge difference for me. Thank you again for commenting.

  • litoria76
    1 year ago

    It’s like the author of this article read my mind! I’m so light sensitive that i have to wear dark sunglasses almost all the time when I am awake, even when driving at night. My neurologist has actually said I shouldn’t be driving at all with my visual issues associated with my chronic migraine (blurred/double vision, blind spot in the unaffected eye, and having to keep my affected eye shut due to extreme pain). Unfortunately not driving is not an option as I’m taking my elderly mother to doctor appointments and have to drive myself to my appointments. Luckily I’ve learned to function on Percocet which is currently my only treatment. Just hope I don’t get pulled over or in an accident!

  • OhnonotAgain18
    1 year ago

    Dear cindyd, So sorry you are going through this. Working with a migraine is the worst especially when your colleagues or the people you work for don’t understand. Then there is the added stress of worrying about getting work done &/or keeping your job. I talked with our HR person & one of my supervisors whom I thought would understand. It helped a bit to let them know I was not a slacker. I kept non-diet Sprite & soda crackers in my desk. Please know you aren’t alone. I admire you for trying so hard. Wish I could give you a hug!

  • cindyd
    1 year ago

    I am just depressed today. Sorry if I bring anyone down but I just feel like I have lost my motivation to do anything. Today is my second work day that I have missed this week. Every week looms ahead of me like a black cloud and I wonder how I will get through it. I live in California and it is beautiful today but I am in a dark room with an ice pack on my head again. The sadness and frustration are so overwhelming. I have a doctor’s appointment next week and am going to address this all with him. Sigh…

  • Joanna Bodner moderator
    1 year ago

    Never apologize @cindyd!! That is why we are here…ESPECIALLY for the days that are so difficult. It’s so challenging to stay motivated when each day continues to be a battle to simply just push through to even make it through the day! Kudos to you for being open expressing how you are feeling and most importantly that you will discussing this with your doctor. I really wanted to share this particular article with you as maybe it would provide you with some hope & comfort knowing you are not alone in these thoughts and just as the title says,that it is possible to break through the “darkness”. – https://migraine.com/blog/breaking-through-the-darkness/. Can you keep us posted and let us know how things go next week? Wishing you a gentle night. -Joanna (Migraine.com Team)

  • MigraineSal
    4 years ago

    Another great article that really relates to my migraine experience. My workplace have been so unsupportive of my health conditions over the last 6 years ( not all migraine related ) that I had to change my whole persona to get colleagues to acknowledge that I was actually ill. I stopped wearing make up so that they could see the pain in my face and went from dressing smartly in nice dresses to wearing trousers ( still looking smart but not as smart as I used to look ) and they did recognise that I wasn’t well. . . finally after treating me like a hypochondriac ! This of course all had an impact on my confidence and well being as wearing full colours, having hair nicely styled and being nicely dressed are things that make a woman feel good about herself and a bit brighter, especially in meetings and being exposed like that made me feel drab. It was however worth the feeling as the penny did eventually drop that I did not look well and I did receive some understanding, even though I lost what I thought was lovely friendship with one of my colleagues. This still saddens me today and I miss the fun we used to have at work, especially at lunchtimes but as has been written on here so many times migraineurs lose friends and family to this awful disease. My attitude now a days is those who have been there for me and taken the time to understand my “invisible” illness are friends and colleagues who deserve my support and loyalty . . . the others can go West and stay there ! The thing I found hardest to accept was that I am one of the hardest working people at my workplace and have always been a loyal colleague with a small “i” in my team . . . that has now been upgraded to a massive “I” as I most definitely need to put myself first with colleagues like the ones I have been blessed with !

    I am part of a Disabled Staff Network and we are having an event to raise awareness of staff with disabilities and I have asked that someone with an “invisible” illness presents so that we can get more of the “don’t judge me until” / “don’t assume because” thing going. I have requested this in the hope that other colleagues don’t get treated like I did and run the risk of losing their closest friends at work because of a lack of understanding. I was battling with a disease I knew nothing about and waiting for a diagnosis and needed my friends more than ever, rather than have them exclude me when I returned to work after a period of absence whilst adjusting to the horrendous two side effects of migraine preventative meds.

  • seagypsy
    5 years ago

    I hate this part of my migraines the most, especially at my workplace. My co-workers don’t get it. They think that because I am “at work,” that I am fine and how bad could the “headache” really be? I am the sole earner for our family of six, so I don’t have a lot of options. I took medical leave last spring (for 7 weeks) and I am not able to do it again any time soon.

    My primary care doc and neuro think that the migraines ramped back up due to peri-menopause about 20 months ago and they went from zero to intractable in less than 60 days. I have not been able to break the cycle for more than a week at a time, so I live with them. They are never less than a 3 and are most often a 6-7. What else can I do? I have to say that the depression, anger, and grief that comes along with everything is in no way pretty. The anger is the worst and I could just smack some of the people that I work with.

    I almost blacked out at work yesterday due to headache pain, but it was month-end and I knew I couldn’t leave. I am in the hole on PTO and cannot afford to lose the money by taking the day off (even though I am a salaried employee and supposed to be exempt). So I laid down on the conference room floor with a cold compress, guzzled some orange juice and a migraine tab, an anti-inflammatory, a muscle relaxer and laid there for 15 minutes with my feet elevated above my head. Then I got back up and went back to work.

    I couldn’t string three words together or walk a straight line, and the room spun for the rest of the day, but the inventory part of month-end got done. The best part is, not one person asked how I was until I left the building at 4 p.m.

  • Sarah Hackley author
    5 years ago

    Wow. Breadwinner for six must be very stressful, especially when you add migraine to the mix. I hope you get to feeling better soon. I know my intractable cycles eventually break, though they can take a long time doing it.

    Warm regards,

    Sarah

  • John Gould
    5 years ago

    Sarah,

    Thank you very much for this – you have gotten right to the heart of the difficulty I’ve been facing for 30 years of living with migraine. Unless I am actually vomiting, no one can begin to understand what is going on inside me. I recently spoke with a friend with back pain severe enough for her to consider surgery, but not so severe that she couldn’t work. We were able to compare notes on being invisible sufferers. I felt comforted, as I do by your article, to know that there are other people like me. Of course, I know that all of us with migraine feel the same, but one of the difficulties with having an invisible illness is the loneliness it brings on.

    Over the years, I have become sort of good at hiding my illness, some of the time, to a point. How’s that for equivocation? I’m a college teacher and I just can’t miss more than one class a semester. This means, of course, that I have to teach in rooms with bright overhead florescent lighting several hours each day. Most of the rest of the time, I am working on the computer or in meetings. There are some days when I leave a class absolutely unsure of what I said. I’m afraid that on those days my students must think that I’m crazy. Often, I am at meetings in body alone – I tend to sit far away from the facilitator, preferably on the dark side of the room (if there is one), and say nothing.

    I am just so relieved to read your article and know in my heart that I’m not alone. Again, thank you!

  • Deb
    1 year ago

    John, fluorescent lighting, bright flashing lights, computer, TV, etc. are also triggers that never fail to induce a migraine for me. I do not know if they would help you, but theraspecs have been a great help to me for light triggers. When I was a pastor, I thought their appearance would be so distracting for the congregation when I preached, I did not get them despite a strong recommendation by a parishioner who had found them to be a tremendous relief. I now have a pair that I wear over my glasses. They have worked wonders resolving that particular trigger. I still have chronic migraine, but every trigger I can control is worth whatever it costs. Now I wear them every day. If you want to try them, you can find them online.
    Best wishes, John, for finding some relief and understanding.

    Sincerely,
    Deb

  • Sarah Hackley author
    5 years ago

    John,

    Oh! Fluorescent lights are one of my worst triggers. I feel for you.

    Knowing we’re not alone is one of the best things about connecting on the Internet. I hope you find relief soon.

    Warm regards,

    Sarah

  • Janet
    5 years ago

    John,
    I stand with you in the loneliness.

    Not sure why, but friends think because you can’t get out because of the migraines you must not want visitors. That is so far from the truth. I asked my husband today as he took me to the doctor for a toradol injection…where are all the new friends I’ve made since we moved to Atlanta??? Where are these Godly women from church who empathized me..and ask my husband week after week, how’s Janet. He replies..the same, no improvement.

    After moving to atlanta one year ago for our first grandchild my days would improve. I guess the weather and the increase of already chronic migraines tells a different story. Missing sunny warm Las Vegas were we spent the last 20 years for health from Chicago…we can run…but there’s no hiding from the migraine monster …

    A lonely migraineur….

    Blessings
    Janet

  • Janet
    5 years ago

    Sarah,
    Thank you for your kind comments.

    I think weather has a lot to do with the season I’m in right now.

    We lived the last 20 years in Las Vegas ..moving from Chicago where we are originally from. Our move east was for our first grandchild and we were hoping that the happiness and togetherness of being near our son and family would help. If our first year here is an indication of how I will be…we’ve made a terrible mistake,

    Again, thank you for responding.

    Blessings
    Janet Jones

  • Sarah Hackley author
    5 years ago

    Janet,

    I relocated back to Texas a few years ago to be near family, and I understand what you’re going through. I love the Austin area, but my migraines are always much, much worse here than in other places. My husband and I plan on eventually moving back to the Pacific Northwest (where they were much better). I hope you find some comfort/relief soon.

    Warm regards,

    Sarah

  • barryolliver
    5 years ago

    I’ve been thinking about how invisible migraines really are for some time, and I’m beginning to think they are more visible than we realise. It’s just most people don’t see the signs, or don’t recognise them as being symptoms of migraine. I started thinking about this as frequently I don’t realise I have a migraine until it is full blown. This might be because I have Aspergers Syndrome, but then again, it might simply be that I’m not very self-aware.

    Whatever the reason, I need to recognise when a migraine is coming on as my executive functioning / cognitive skills are often severely affected. I’m one of the fortunate ones who don’t always have severe headaches during a migraine episode, but on the other hand, I think I would be committing a criminal act if I tried to drive as a migraine affects my vision, judgement and reaction times too much to be safe.

    I’m building a list of all the changes that occur to me before, during and after a migraine episode, and it’s quite surprising how many there are:
    Squinting (photophobia), hunching my shoulders to noise (phonphobia), mangling or forgetting words (aphasia), appearing drunk (balance and coordination), not recognising faces or locations, expressionless face, bumping into things in my right field of vision, inability to read or write, tremor on right side, inability to follow a conversation, irritable, lethargic (during a migraine), hyperactive (just before a migraine), and many more. All these can easily be picked up by others but not usually recognised as migraine symptoms.

    Admittedly, my symptoms are more extreme than typical and so about half my migraine episodes are very visible. But the other half still have subtle symptoms visible to anyone who knows what to look for.

    Possibly for the majority of migraineurs the pain is the most severe symptom, and as such is often invisible to others. But if you think about it, most will also display other symptoms that others can learn to recognise. It’s all part of educating the public (and many medical professionals) that a migrain is not just a bad headache.

    Even if you are determined to “soldier on” during a migraine, I think it’s important that others know what you are going through – not for sympathy – but so they can better accommodate your needs at that time.

    For over 30 years, I strived to hide my migraines so that I would appear “normal”. Them I had a wake up call that made me realise that I was often a danger to myself and others – especially when driving or working on electrical equipment. It’s now something I no longer keep secret. You could say I’m something of a campaigner…

  • Sarah Hackley author
    5 years ago

    Barry,

    You are so right! There are visible aspects to migraine, it is just that most people don’t recognize them (which makes it very much an invisible illness). I, too, have aphasia before/during a migraine attack. I also have severe vertigo that makes me run into things. My husband has started to recognize these symptoms, and now can tell me when I need to go to bed.

    Warm regards,

    Sarah

  • Sabrina
    5 years ago

    Finally, someone gets it. Thank you!

  • mia
    5 years ago

    Thanks for great article, and for pointing out the upside to the invisibility that I hadn’t really considered before. 🙂

  • undefeatedbella
    5 years ago

    Thank you so much for expressing what I struggle to express. It is only when people see me as I am at this moment when I am bedridden, with ice pacs and searing pain in my head, but not too many people see me like this so I relate very much to all you said in the article. I am trying to accept that I can Not waste what little strength I have on trying to maintain relationships with people that are not willing to at least be supportive even if they don’t understand. I feel like if I was in a wheelchair people “might” have a clue but I don’t wish to be in a wheelchair either but at times feel very frustrated that so called friends, acquaintances and even family have judged me so harshly. I am glad I have a place to go where others truly can understand. Thank you so much.

  • Sarah Hackley author
    5 years ago

    Bella,

    I think your screen name says it all: undefeated. It’s hard to cope with what we all go through on a constant basis, but it’s wonderful to have people who understand. I agree that you can’t waste time on the people who refuse to understand your situation, though I think many people just don’t know enough to understand. Hopefully stories like the ones told in the comment section here will help with that. I hope you feel better soon.

    Warm regards,

    Sarah

  • TracyM09
    5 years ago

    Migraines have been the best acting class ever invented! I don’t want to go out telling everyone that I feel totally miserable, so I fake feeling fine and responding in kind! My Mom usually knows when I’ve got a Migraine, however, I sometimes fake her out just so she doesn’t worry about the 4th straight day of a Migraine. Though I’ve gotten good at acting, sometimes I just cannot hide the symptoms! Inability to follow a simple conversation, blank spots, squinty eyes…you all know the deal!! Life with Migraines goes on and so must I!

  • Sarah Hackley author
    5 years ago

    Tracy,

    I hear you. Before she passed, my mother often commented about how she forgot I was in “such horrible pain all of the time” because I “looked fine.” It takes a tremendous amount of fortitude to keep up the act. Here’s hoping you can drop it sometimes. We all need people who understand.

    Warm regards,

    – Sarah

  • Janet
    5 years ago

    Sarah,
    Excellent excellent article!!!! Your picture appears as such a young lady to have achieved such awesome accomplishments as far as authoring books.

    I will send this article to friends and family as I do many of the wonderfully written articles in the website…but I fear, as most of the articles I send, end up in the trash bin, unread or never commented on.

    Tears streamed my face because the words I hear so often are “but you look great”….that’s the idea. Sometimes I wish I would puke all over their shoes….

    Right now I’m in a very very bad season of chromic migraines and being new to atlanta I can’t get into Emory until July 21st for help. After 38 years of migraine, the last 12 chronic daily ones….I’m afraid to step on to that awful merry go round once again for the umpteenth time.

    Blessings
    Janet Jones

  • Sarah Hackley author
    5 years ago

    Janet,

    I’m so sorry to hear you’re having such a tough time right now. The transition between winter and spring can be a tough one for many people (myself included). I too often hear “but you look great,” which is one of the reasons I wrote this article. I’m glad it spoke to you, and I hope some of your friends and family hear the message you’re sending.

    Warm regards,

    Sarah

    PS – To be honest, the picture is about 5 years old, but I haven’t had time to get a new headshot done. 😉

  • Ujima Moore
    5 years ago

    Thank you for this article. It really helped to hear someone describe what I experience on a good or bad day. Sometimes I feel alone with this illness and selfish because mine is an “invisible” illness that I have been living with for 34 years. I have had many friends and co-workers sympathize with my struggles but there is also a lack of understanding and belief on their part. Most people have had a headache so they equate a migraine with their experience and then think I am over reacting so I often do not complain unless I am too sick to continue. I was the employee who is last to leave and finished assignments then spent my lunch break laying in my office with the lights out. On a bad day driving two hours to work was almost impossible and I have to car accidents under my belt from blurry vision and slow reaction times. Thankfully, no one was ever hurt. So thank you for giving me something that I can show others to help them understand a little better.

  • Sarah Hackley author
    5 years ago

    Ujima,

    I understand completely. Before I left the world of accounting and business management to write full-time, I was often the one who got in early, left late, and took work home. Eventually, my migraine attacks became too intense and too frequent to keep that up, and I had to make some changes. I’m glad to hear this article may help you express yourself and your situation to those around you. That’s one of the main reasons I wrote it.

    Warm regards,

    Sarah

  • bellspirit
    5 years ago

    Sarah, thank you for writing this. It is exactly what I experience and I don’t think I could have written any better than you did. It does look strange to people who don’t totally know me to find out what I go through, because they see me as so active many days and also looking fine on the outside. Over the years I’ve lost a few friends here and there because they didn’t understand that I genuinely needed to take care of myself and had to cancel plans. Overall I get support from those closest to me. The only thing I would have added to what you wrote is at the very last sentence – people should only ask if they really want to know.Some people ask how we are just to be polite, but then if we answer truthfully and it’s not a good day,they really wished they hadn’t asked. Not everyone, but many. Hope this makes sense. I’m getting a migraine as I am typing this, but wanted to reply. Thank you again.

  • Sarah Hackley author
    5 years ago

    Bellspirit,

    I agree. Hopefully, after hearing more stories like the ones here, more and more people will care enough to ask. I hope you feel better soon.

    Warm regards,

    Sarah

  • Angie
    5 years ago

    Sarah, I just got out of the hospital, for the second time, to treat status migrainousus. The migraines have been getting worse for some time but I have had this one for almost 60 days. I understand that does not come close to your situation.

    Unfortunately, my supervisor and co- workers are not so understanding, even though I’ve worked with many of them for over ten years. I hear the “it’s just a headache” & “she just needs to work through it” comments made behind my back on a regular basis. If they only knew how many migraines I do “work through” only to come home, take meds and lay on an ice pack until morning.

    I am suppose to go back to work on a limited schedule next week if all goes well. But I’m nervous. Any words of wisdom?

  • Sarah Hackley author
    5 years ago

    Angie,

    That’s rough. I know when I worked outside the home and was in the midst of one of my intractable periods, I felt the same way. I knew many of my colleagues didn’t understand and felt I was slacking off, even though I put in 10-12 hours/day on my well days. Eventually, I asked my boss (who was the CEO, so no upper management had to be considered) to allow me to take work home every night, in case I was too sick to drive the next morning. We set up my laptop to access my desktop remotely, and I started working many, many days from the comfort of my bed. At least then, I didn’t have to drive when I was too dizzy to walk, and I could work lying down. That helped me for awhile. I also changed the lighting in my office and started keeping my door shut more often (even though I got looks for that, too). Have you made or asked for any workplace modifications? Your doctor may be able to advise you on which things might help you out the most. In any case, I hope you start to feel better soon. I know too well how terrible you must feel.

    Warm regards,

    Sarah

  • Ujima Moore
    5 years ago

    I hope all goes well. You have my empathy and support. I experience bouts where I am hitting the hospital at least once a month for 60 days and my boss and a very few friends did not understand. I understand your struggle and what a victory it is when we do succeed. Know from this site that there are many of us out here who Do understand.

  • jean
    5 years ago

    Thank you for creating this site and letting me join. I have had migraines since I was a teenager and still have them at 78 years old. When I was younger doctors did not know a thing about migraines. This is a wonderful website.

  • kelmonster
    5 years ago

    Just wanted to say Thank you for the article. I sent it to my family and co-workers to give them an idea of what I experience.

  • Rich
    5 years ago

    This is very good article and so true, as a Migraine sufferer it is often looked at as a “headache” which in essence it is however, it is also so much more. To give a real world and personal example I remember one of mine beginning while I was driving down the road and all the sudden the visual effects started it was like someone had flipped a pair of Binoculars over my head backwards, almost hit a road sign as I tried to slow down and get off the road way, sat there for about 15 minutes before it started to go away and the pain started coming on. ~R

  • Brian in TN
    5 years ago

    My biggest challenge with my chronic migraines is the emotional component, my frustration builds to the point where my temper is almost uncontrollable. After a verbal tirade at work last months I received a 2 day suspension for inappropriate language that will be 2 weeks long next time. I’ve considered getting a black ball cap with “Leave me alone” on it to warn people when I’m in a black mood.

  • Katie M. Golden moderator
    5 years ago

    Brian,
    I’m really sorry about your experience. It’s got to be frustrating to know that your mood has been altered by the Migraines. I personally noticed that I would get short and really snappy with people at work. So much of a contrast to my easy-going normal self.
    Have you mentioned this to your Headache Specialist? There are certain Migraine abortive medications that also double as anti-depressants (elavil, amitriptyline) that could help to even out your mood. I’m not saying that drugs are always the answer, but your doctor may have other options to help you, especially since it is affecting your work.
    -Katie

  • RTGmom
    5 years ago

    Sarah it is hard to live with an “invisible” illness. I am still recovering from a prolonged status migraine lasting more than 100+ days, that then turned into GI issues from side effects of meds helping my head. I have not been to work in six months I have a job that I must be “on” my peers have been supportive but I feel as though they are probably at the point of enough is enough! I fear that even if I am feeling okay and go to work what happens if fall back into the prolonged migraine. Oh how we go around and around with our migraines!

  • Sarah Hackley author
    5 years ago

    RTGmom,

    I am so sorry you’re dealing with this. I suffered from two bouts of intractable migraine, both of which lasted for two years. Eventually, the cycle broke, and I became chronic again, instead of intractable. It is important to get help where and when you can. I hope your peers and colleagues continue to show you support, and know that we here at Migraine.com understand what you’re going through. Here’s hoping you feel better soon.

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