Who Would You Have Been Without Migraines?

Who Would You Have Been Without Migraines?

Who would you have been without migraines? What would you have accomplished in this lifetime if you hadn’t been hampered by severe pain and related symptoms?

What if?

It’s heartbreaking to consider what the world would look like if the 36 million people impacted by migraine could actually accomplish that which we are passionate about. In my heart of hearts I know the world would be a more beautiful place if we all could be released from migraines and put the time we are in pain to use in the world.

People with migraines are generally compassionate because they understand what it means to be crippled by severe pain. To that end, I would bet that once released by pain, former migraineurs would pursue worthy goals aimed toward helping others who are struggling. Goals that would have a positive impact on the lives of others; perhaps finding ways to provide support, wellness and compassion. And because we value the limited time that we are well, I bet once freed, we’d also be extraordinarily productive.  We would not take even a moment for granted. We would live lives of gratitude and live by example- offering to others the compassion we might’ve wished we had received during our days with migraine.

Life is but a dream…

I’ve had my own dreams of what I would do if I were to be released from migraines and I’m sure you have had those fantasies too. I watch people without migraines and am envious of those who are well enough to doggedly pursuing their passions. But I find myself almost upset at those who are well who are NOT doing so. Again, so many people take their wellness for granted.

On a regular basis, I visit the dream of what I would like to be accomplishing, if I was able to pursue my interests, unencumbered by pain. I think of myself going to school for accreditation, and then moving into the workforce. In my mind’s eye, I see myself on a schedule, with people counting on me to show up on a specific day and time.

Reality bites

Then I wake up. The painful and sobering reality of chronic migraine comes back and shakes me out of my fantasy. The daily severe pain, accompanying symptoms of nausea and vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound, all combine to make my dream ludicrous. How could I possibly commit to the pursuit of a degree, since it requires a rigid class schedule?  Ultimately, if I made it through the coursework, how could I ever be counted on to hold a consistent schedule? Migraines hit at the most random times. They can be worse with added stress, which would surely come with any coursework or employment.

In lieu of my dream, I have found other ways to contribute to this world. I have created several art projects to help fulfill my creative impulses. And, I am able to do projects without deadlines from my home. In this society that values productivity over so much else, I have to admit it feels good to have something to point to that I am “doing.” But ultimately, being unable to pursue what I would choose for myself, if given freedom from migraines, is very defeating and feels hugely unfair.

Again, I applaud those in this world who are pursuing their passions. Regardless of whether or not they realize how lucky they are to have the option– I celebrate their pursuit.  I simply wish those of us with migraines could be given the opportunity to do the same.

Do you have a passion you wish you could pursue but your migraines keep you from doing so? Are there other ways you can meet that need?

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

View Comments (35)
  • KABMUL
    2 years ago

    My career suffered as well; a job of 14 years where I was required to travel about 25% of the time which added to the migraines. Topomax and other like profilactic meds caused memory issues. Lost 6 weeks vacation, downturn in the oil and gas industry, cheating husband saying “I’m not his fun sexy best friend” anymore…” whatever. I would like to just know what it feels like to live not in pain. To be able to go jogging and not feel like I am going to have an aneurism. To not worry that again I am going to wake up with a migraine, or get stuck in an elevator with someone with perfume, or a storm roll in, or have to have someone else pick my daughter up from school because I can’t drive. I feel like a failure sometimes.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 years ago

    KABMUL- you are not alone! What you describe – the topomax brain fog, wanting to experience a break from the fear that migraine imposes upon us when all we want to do is exercise, transport our children, take an elevator, or enjoy an oncoming change in weather. You are not a failure. You are part of a community of millions of people who are doing our best to maneuver around an incredibly challenging and demanding condition. One that asks us to dig deep and find strength we never knew we had. I guess what I’m saying is rather than seeing yourself as a failure, perhaps turn it around and consider yourself a success for making it through days of tremendous pain. https://migraine.com/living-migraine/the-accomplishment-of-making-it-through-a-day-with-a-migraine/

    I’m so glad you are a part of our community. Stay in touch! Warmly, Holly (migraine.com team).

  • pigen51
    2 years ago

    I often tell my kids that can’t means won’t, but realistically, with this chronic illness, the word can’t actually does apply. I was what many would call an over achiever in high school. I did all the right things, was kind to everyone, volunteered, was the senior athlete of the year, was bright enough that I could have entered any field that I chose. The thing that held me back at the time was not the migraines, but that other dreaded problem that befalls many of us, love. I was in love and got married. I had a child right away, and spent the next 35 years of my life toiling away in a foundry as a foundry rat. I still had all the potential that I did when I was young, and at times tried to go to college, but by then, the migraines had taken over to the point where I could not sustain long term studies. My passion at this point, that I would pursue if I could, is music. I have always played many instruments, sax being my main one, and I also played in a rock and roll band. If I were able to know that I could guarantee that I would be certain that I could make all gigs, I would start playing out again. Even session work would be fun, but again, they rely on time schedules, and I just cannot guarantee anything anymore. Mostly these days the bad days outnumber the good, but I have learned to try and take advantage of the good. Many people have it much worse than I do. I could be the parent sitting beside a bed holding the hand of a child who will never know that I am there. I have seen that, and it breaks my heart for them, and makes me realize how blessed I am, even with my troubles.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 years ago

    pigen51- thank you so much for your comment. I share your love of music and your wish that it could be a greater part of life. Migraine does make its pursuit (like so many other things) difficult. I commend your attitude to embrace the good days, even when they are few and far between. And the fact that you keep a healthy perspective about the challenges of those around you. I do think migraine does worlds to make us compassionate people. So glad you are with us. Holly (migraine.com team)

  • Joanna Bodner moderator
    2 years ago

    Hi there pigen51,
    What a beautiful reflection you have shared with us. Thank you for your willingness to open up and touch upon so many components that I am sure so many within our community can relate all too well with. It takes a tremendous amount effort to continually try to look to the “bright side of migraine” and kudos to you for your positive outlook. Because yes…while someone else may of course have things worse, life with migraine is extremely challenging. Thanks for being here and being such a supportive member of our community. Warmly, Joanna (Migraine.com Team)

  • EvilFluorescents
    2 years ago

    I WAS somebody in an earlier version of my life; back in my teens, twenties and thirties, migraines would only hit half a dozen times a year, and while debilitating and annoying, they didn’t impede my career or life. I was an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon with a thriving practice. Being a doctor was my identity; it was “who I was.”

    I sacrificed four years of undergrad; then, four additional years of Dental School; and lastly, another five more years of an Oral and Maxillofacial Residency in my educational pursuit, only to have 13-years of post-secondary education dissipate into the ionosphere and fritter away into a life not dissimilar to an invalid. What went from a few migraines a year intensified over time to 3-4 times per week, with absolutely no indication of what may trigger one to occur.

    My neurologist and I dramatically reduced my diet down to brown rice and water, adding only one new food each week. I did learn that nitrates, nitrites, phosphoric acid, benzoic acid, and almost any kind of preservative would induce an instant headache; likewise almost any sort of alcoholic beverage, including red and white wines would, too; with the lone exception of potato-based vodka, which I consume exceedingly rarely. No caffeine. No chocolate. No carbonated beverages. No aged cheeses. No Chinese food. And the list goes on… My current guidelines are that if food comes in a box, bottle or can, it will cause a migraine. This leaves fresh fruits, fresh meat, fresh vegetables, and lots of water. Granted, this is a lot healthier than what I was eating 15 years ago, but I miss trying sauces and new dishes at restaurants; and playing the role of the “Grand Inquisitor” of every waiter, asking how each particular food item is prepared.

    But the most frustrating part is that even if follow my “migraine diet” to perfection, there are still external stimuli that can nail me: my worst two demons are barometric pressure and fluorescent lights that are starting to go bad, and rapidly flicker in light out-put. That’s when I go over the edge… I no longer drive. One of the fresh new hells that I’ve recently experienced is the onset of allodynia. Apparently, after an extended period (years) of enduring migraines, that’s one of the fun sequelae… There’s no way to predict when a migraine will hit, thus there is no ability in my life to make any long term plans. Spontaneity has become a permanent feature in any activity I may attempt to pursue. The upside is that when I do have a good day, you can darn well be sure I’m not going to waste it by mowing the grass or cleaning a toilet.

    I’ve had to give up my medical practice. I can’t play roulette with patients, hoping that my good days will coincidentally happen to fall on a Monday through a Thursday. I don’t even enjoy volunteering, because I can’t be relied upon, to show up at the free clinic. And I hate to be thought of as “unreliable”.

    In my instance, migraines are very familial. My paternal grandfather had them, and he had no medication of any sort to help him get through the ordeal– only a dark room in which to retire for two or three days. Five of his seven children have/had migraines, including my father; two/thirds of my father’s children suffer from them. My middle brother, an attorney, and I who are both afflicted, are also both childless by choice. The younger brother that doesn’t have migraines has two children. Fifty percent of his kids have migraines… I feel like our family is the migraine equivalent of the Hapsburg’s dynasty’s hemophilia…

    As a doctor I’ve had opportunities to participate in several drug trials, from Mayo Clinic to University settings, all to no avail. Botox therapy was a bust, and at this point I’m on too many “prophylactic” medications to be involved in any study group. I learned many years ago that opiates may make the pain better for an hour or two, but the repercussions were horrendous. Back in the day, I started requesting Fiorinal after major surgeries, so that I could use them when a migraine hit. No post-surgical pain ever compared to an 8- or 9-migraine, on a 1-10 chart… And as absurd as it may sound, I didn’t start seeing a neurologist till my early forties. After all, back then, what really could be done?

    What an exciting time 1993 was, with the advent of Imitrex– except that it didn’t work for me; still, it gave me hope that drug companies were at least beginning to address the problem and realize that there was a large population that could benefit from medication. Anti-emetics are my friends for nausea; my blood pressure is already so low that Beta-blockers and Calcium-channel blockers are out of the question; tri-cyclics were ineffective; that left only anti-convulsants for preventive therapy. I’ve endured side-effects of everything from alopecia areaota to the stultification of Topamax; moreover, none of them have really helped.

    So far, the best medicinal coping strategy for me is Amerge 2.5 mg (naratriptan), Zofran, trimethobenzamide, Fiorinal, Ibuprofen, tizanidine, Sumavel DosePro, a dark room and about 48 hours of very quiet bed rest. If that’s not successful, it’s off to the ED for IV fluids, and a steroid-cocktail to break the status migrainosus. And I eagerly await more research as to causation and different treatment modalities that don’t leave me in a zombie-like state for the following two or three days post-migraine. But hey– in all sincerity, as bad as it is, I comfort myself that I only have migraines, and not pancreatic cancer; it helps me keep some sort of perspective.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 years ago

    EvilFluorescents – Thank you for sharing so much of your compelling story. There was much I could relate to. My son was born with a cleft lip/palate so I have interacted with many physicians with your impressive specialty. I know it takes a great amount of training and compassion. I also was sidelined from my career and know the devastation that comes along with that reality. Additionally, a fellow contributor on our site, https://migraine.com/patient-advocates/kerrie-smyres/ has done a lot of experimentation with her diet – similar to what you describe. You might check out some of her articles to see what you have in common.

    When so many others are wrestling with the many comorbid conditions that accompany migraine (not to mention countless other health challenges) I have also found myself saying “I only have migraine”. Luckily, my friends and family are quick to remind me that migraines alone are plenty to deal with.

    As to upcoming treatments, I, like you, are currently taking too many medications to partake in any clinical trials- however I do have my eye on a supposedly big breakthrough coming on the horizon- wondering if you’d heard of: https://migraine.com/?s=cgrp&submit=Go

    So glad you are a part of our community. Warmly, Holly (migraine.com team)

  • Catherine
    2 years ago

    Suffering with chronic migraines for the past 42 years, I’ve often fantasized about this question. In my alternative universe, where I am not plagued with daily threats of ice-pick-like pain behind my eye, nausea, brain fog, bone-aching fatigue, weakness, and despair, I would be contributing to society. I’d be successful in a real career, with a sustainable income. My near 20-year marriage wouldn’t have failed. I could have gone to grad school, earned a higher degree. . . I’d have energy to pursue my passions: painting, hiking, cooking, volunteering at the wildlife rehab center, bird watching, nurturing relationships with my family, climbing 14ers, dancing, enjoying live music, socializing with friends, skiing, reading voraciously, creative writing . . . There are days when my pain level is only a 2, and I see a glimmer of light. On those rare days, I celebrate life with a hike in the mountains, or a Plein Air painting session, or a conversation with a friend. After just one day of feeling almost fine, I am hopeful. But then, reality crashes down, and another migraine slays another day, and then another. Then, the fantasy of my better self, suffocates me with despair. Sometimes the What Ifs feel like a cruel, cosmic joke.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 years ago

    Catherine- you are not alone! The roller coaster rides between “well days” (when the pain is low enough to embrace life) and “bed days” (when we’re laid out flat by the severe pain and other symptoms) are crazy-making and allow for no traction or momentum when it comes to our passions or interests. It can be almost painful to indulge in the thoughts of what our migraine-free lives would look like. But, as you said, when we’ve had migraines for years, it is impossible not to wonder. The hope is that when we gain real clarity about what we wish we could be doing, we are quick to achieve what we love – even if our wellness comes in moments. As you described- as soon as you are well enough, you celebrate life with a hike in the mountains or conversation with a friend. Migraines make us grateful for those glimmers of light. I am coming to see that, ironically, migraineurs are among the most grateful people on the planet. On this crazy roller coaster ride with you, Holly (migraine.com team).

  • Anne
    2 years ago

    I would be in such great shape. I used to love exercising and hiking but migraines have made me fear pushing myself to hard because it can mean days in bed and loss of a job. The sunlight and overheating is always a trigger. It’s such a bummer because migraines have turned me from a go-getter into a get-byer. I’m just now being able to get back to the gym because of a break in my migraines – down to one a week – and it is really hard. I’m afraid of pushing myself. I would also be in a career by now, but I can’t stay the extra hours it needs when I can barely make it through the day. Even with just one migraine a week, I still have to sleep a lot of the weekend to prevent more attacks. The fatigue that comes with migraines is all-encompassing. I can’t push myself anymore. I’ve had to take a job that I’m able to do with a migraine. But, it’s starting to turn around and I’m taking a class that will lead to more classes that will lead to graduate school. One step at a time. I’ve learned to take it slow because I never know when my being will be commandeered by migraine.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 years ago

    Hi Anne- pacing is key. Sounds like you’ve really figured that out. Hard to do, but important. I’m with you on the fitness thing. I majored in dance in college and was accustomed to pushing myself to the limit physically. It is very hard to watch my body get mushy as my migraines won’t allow me to be as active as I’d like to be. Go-getter to get-byer– that’s a great way to summarize it! Thanks for sharing and good luck with the steps you’re taking to graduate school. Warmly, Holly (migraine.com team).

  • aks868
    2 years ago

    Amen! I have to remind myself every day to be grateful for what i have not jealous of everyone who does not suffer from migraines. It is really hard though.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 years ago

    Hi Aks2868- precisely. It is difficult not to be envious of others. I do think, if we look hard enough, we might even find that unexpected life gifts may’ve emerged along the way due to the different path that migraines forced us to take. Just the simple act of being grateful is something that people with migraines understand in a way that few others do. We really appreciate our moments of wellness like few others! Thanks for sharing. Warmly, Holly (migraine.com team).

  • lmbrackett
    2 years ago

    I would still be active in my church and community. Perhaps I would still be married. Just perhaps. I would further my education – I love to learn. Though I am VERY grateful for my work-from-home job I would go back to working with people. I wanted to foster children. I would visit my children often. I would make plans without worrying about my ability to follow through. It would be a very different life.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 years ago

    Hi lisabfl- thank you for sharing the vision of where you might’ve been had it not been for your migraines. It is interesting to think about the ways this condition has caused us to shift away from how we envisioned our lives. Hopefully unexpected gifts unfold in living differently. I share your wishes about fostering children and being around family more often. Glad you’re a part of our community! Warmly, Holly (migraine.com team).

  • kateymac
    2 years ago

    Thank you so much, Holly, for your kind and supportive reply. It helps to interact with people who TRULY understand the loss and isolation inherent in this chronic illness. It’s hard to find people who truly GET how little we can do most days of our lives since becoming so ill. I feel like I live in some kind of strange limbo, where I wish for my old self and have no idea how to deal with this herky-jerky existence I’ve been thrown into, no matter how many, many years it has gone on.

    “Who would we be without migraine?” – is a great question to help us experience the great comfort of sharing our losses with others.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 years ago

    aw thanks, kate. Sorry for the slow reply- but of course, as evidenced by your very message, I’ve been down for the count due to the herky-jerky existence that we share. It’s hard to repeatedly come up for air and remember where I was last time I went under. Very disorienting, isn’t it? It truly helps to know there are others who are bobbing like I am, though it’s not something I’d ever wish on anyone else. Here’s hoping you’re up for air today- Warmly, Holly (migraine.com team)

  • kateymac
    2 years ago

    I would be IN SHAPE & STRONG, instead of weak & atrophied by years of migraine immobility.
    I would be ACTIVELY INVOLVED in the lives of my nieces & nephews, other family, and all the FRIENDS I’ve lost touch with! I miss them SOOOOO much! I was ALL ABOUT my friends. Migraine life is a LONELY life.
    I would be gainfully employed instead of dependent on disability. I’m grateful for it, but I HATE IT at the same time. Dependency is scary to me.
    I would see MUSIC MUSIC MUSIC – LIVE – on a very frequent basis, as I used to. My favorite bands are in town all the time, but I barely ever have music on quietly in my apartment anymore, due to constant photophobia.
    I would DANCE!

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 years ago

    oh kate. Love what you said. Completely relate to every single word. We would be fast friends. When I wrote this article, I was inspired by the idea of getting accreditation for a body movement therapy approach. I wish I could pursue something that would allow me to be physically active every day. I “go there” in my mind from time to time until reality hits once again.

    I love that you prioritize your family and I’m sure they feel your desire to be with them regardless of your ability to be there. I put my family first too, but cannot be there in all the ways I want to be. Migraine, by its very nature, is absolutely isolating.

    Music and dance! oh. Me too me too. I’m with you. Let’s have some quiet low impact virtual dance parties in those fleeting moments as we walk from room to room and feel well enough to do so. Those are the moments I break the silence in my house, and sing out.

    Most warmly- and so happy you are a part of our community- Holly B.

  • LAnnSmith
    2 years ago

    I’d have my PhD in mathematics of some sort. Then teaching at a college somewhere, not a big university. Living in a small cute house on a big piece of land, away from town. Lots of windows, uncluttered, a nice kitchen, and a sunroom where I can putter with house plants and paint, cats sleeping in sun spots on the floor. A big old creaky wooden porch. Of course there’d be great gardens and trees outside, enough of the land still natural so the dogs can run after rabbits.
    (Perhaps I’ve given this a little thought over the years ☺️)

  • LAnnSmith
    2 years ago

    Hi neighbor!

  • DonnaFA moderator
    2 years ago

    Hi LAnnSmith,

    Oh my, that sounds absolutely lovely! See that neighbor out your kitchen window? That’s me 🙂 Thanks for sharing! – Warmly, Donna (Migraine.com team)

  • Tamara
    2 years ago

    I would have been able to continue my holistic nutrition degree and continue being able to open my small animal nutritional consualtant practise (I have no memory now because of the migraines or my meds so studying and thinking is out of the question, I can’t even remember how old I am most days because of the pain).

    I would be able to continue living in my own house I was able to buy at 26 years old. I am seriously facing having to move home because I am only able to work part time but still make too much money for any govenerment assistance.

    I would be able to still volunteer and give back to society through my church and other activities. Now all I do is drain on resources and sit at home. I think I have to stop fostering dogs too because I just don’t have the energy or patience on days like today – migraine hangover and second day in a row I can’t walk pup so he is whining and hyper and into everything.

    I would be able to continue my passion – horseback riding and jumping. I don’t care if it’s over 2 feet or not but it was my world and each day I got to go was my favourite day. I have not been able to ride for over 2 years and still cry daily because of it.

    Basically I would not be a crumbly mess of pain and actually be able to do things, help people and not be the useless in pain thing I am now.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 years ago

    Hi Tamara- Your comment illustrates the widespread ways migraines can impact our lives. You are not alone in feeling distraught and I’m glad you could share your grief with us. Reflecting on what might’ve or could’ve been is a normal part of having migraines.

    There is a saying “Life is what happens while you’re busy making plans.” When migraines sideline us from our life plans, other experiences happen in their place and inform who we are. Migraines bring out our compassion and appreciation for any moment of wellness. The dogs you have fostered, and the volunteer work at your church, whether or not it’s something you can continue, all those you’ve touched- have benefitted greatly from your kindness and warmth. Hopefully it’s something you’ll be able to resume one day.

    In the meantime, I hope you’ve got a good group of friends and/or family to return the favor and provide you with the warmth and kindness you’ve given others. A network of support is key when we have a heavy load. Whether it is in person or online, a professional counselor, a support group, or a weekly date with a good friend, be sure you’ve got people to help you through.

    We are glad you’re a part of our community. Please keep in touch and remember we’re here to provide support and information anytime.

    Warmly, Holly (migraine.com team).

  • Erin
    2 years ago

    I would have moved to California. So that I could go to school, and become a marine biologist. I would kill to have been able to study Great White Sharks. Or graduate with a history degree. Then I would study World War II, and travel where the White sharks go. I wanted all of that so much.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 years ago

    Oh Erin- I love those wondrous and lofty academic goals of yours. My sister had dreams of being a marine biologist for most of her young life before she tried her first scuba dive during which she got sick and quickly changed her mind.

    Migraines do take a toll on our ability to concentrate and focus. I still hear such a passion in your words. Perhaps one day there will be a way to re-route that drive in a way that the limitations of migraines won’t get in the way. Volunteering at a local aquarium- a trip some day to swim with the dolphins?

    Migraines have robbed me of my ability to read, of all things. Long passages are triggers for me. My discovery of audiobooks and podcasts have been lifesavers for me and allowed me to embrace continued learning on my own. I offer this to you as an idea for you to ponder potential workarounds to perhaps still realize your dream in perhaps a very different way.

    Glad you joined the conversation. Thinking of you- Holly (migraine.com team)

  • Judy H
    2 years ago

    I would have traveled. My husband and I are people who like to investigate foreign cultures and languages. We would have been travelers – NOT vacationers. (Sorry to sound like a snob.) There is a difference. I would have gotten a PhD. I would have tried out many independent restaurants that specialize in ethnic cuisines.
    As it is, I am afraid to try anything that might have MSG, fermented fish paste, etc.
    My life would have been very different without migraines.
    As it stands now, I can’t wait to retire – 2 years – and learn to cook ethnic foods on my own so that I can navigate and avoid recipes with nasty ingredients that trigger migraines.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 years ago

    Hi Judy H- Thank you for your comment. I like that you share how you plan to pursue your dream to explore other lands through cooking. It shows that you can still realize a passion, albeit in a very different way than initially planned. Migraines do cause us to rechart our course, and redefine our sense of self sometimes repeatedly- you demonstrate a great example of how to do that in a healthy way. Best of luck with your cooking experimentations! Warmly, Holly (migraine.com team)

  • Luna
    2 years ago

    I would be who I was even with attacks about every 6 weeks that only affected me for at the most 3 days. The “good ole days” when I could socialize and drive anywhere.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 years ago

    Hi Luna- thanks for sharing. Wild how migraine takes and then takes some more, isn’t it? We sometimes don’t realize how good we have it until it gets 10 times worse. I can barely remember when my migraines were episodic. The good ole’ days indeed. You are not alone. Please remember we are here anytime for support. Warmly, Holly (migraine.com team).

  • GardensatNight
    2 years ago

    I would travel. My husband and I used to plan one trip somewhere cool we’d never been each year before I got sick. A month before our world came crashing down, we had been planning a huge trip to the coast for the summer. Ha ha, exactly what a light sensitive person wants.

    But really, I would just be the old me.

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 years ago

    Hi GardensatNight – your username alone shows that you’ve found ways to workaround your migraines. I love that. There are some real gifts in that lesson. I’m betting when you garden at night, you have seen things you wouldn’t have otherwise seen if you’d been only gardening in the light of day. My point of course is that migraines, while they take and take, they sometimes gift too. The coast is akin to gardening in daylight (a very hard place for us migraineurs). Perhaps a mountain trip would be akin to gardening at night? So glad you’re a part of our community. Keep in touch. Warmly- Holly (migraine.com team).

  • Devonlee
    2 years ago

    I would travel!

  • Holly Baddour moderator author
    2 years ago

    Devonlee- you are NOT alone! look at all of these comments! So glad you’re here. Warmly, Holly (migraine.com team).

  • Elizabeth Roberts-Zibbel moderator
    2 years ago

    Oh Devonlee, me too! I think that’s my biggest one. I don’t mind not having a “career” really, and am very happy with the life I have and my kids. But man, I wish I could GO places like normal people. Europe! The Grand Canyon! Australia! ❤️Thank you for your comment 🙂

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