Is it all in my head?

Hello! I’m 30 with 4 kids and a hubby that is my caregiver. I have had migraines since I was 7, I started recognising the auras and triggers and by 18 I had them manageable. 2008 I started having horrible daily headaches and then with my last pregnancy in 2010 had to have an MRI (had been in hospital several times that month) and they discovered an AVM and my neuro started treating the physical symptoms as Well as my migraines. Now I have daily morning headaches I get so tired I nap any day I have to go run errands, had some physical issues and they just exacerbate the daily headaches nausea and frequent migraines. On neurontin I have 1-3 migraines a week, some times they last up to four days other times they just slam me with an icepick through the eye and nausea and vertigo I get spun out just walking and turning around. But the intense migraines are usually only a few hours. So we are going to 2018… 10 years. We moved to a new state and I have a new Neuro she orders MRI to check AVM.. Says it is an angina not AVM and that my headaches and shooting pains that wake me up… ARE ALL IN MY HEAD… Soooo what the mess do I do now? It is Hell getting a new Dr in my area and I am stuck feeling questioning myself… How could I be doing this to myself? How could random nerve pain be caused intentionally when they wake me up in my sleep? I went on Celexa to see if maybe I needed it… No friggin change in intensity or frequency. Any suggestions would help


Community Answers
  • mattnginger author
    11 months ago

    Thank you so so much! I do have a heart murmur and sometimes my anxiety attacks don’t feel normal so it may be angina I think I’m going to see a better neuro that is more specialized in January. Thank you!

  • Luna
    11 months ago

    Of course it is in your head. Migraine is a neurological brain dysfunction that affects the whole body. I really like this descripton
    http://makethislookawesome.blogspot.com/2011/11/what-is-migraine.html

    Does this sound like what you get? If not, Get a 2nd opinion.
    Angina often is described as pressure, squeezing, burning, or tightness in the chest. The pain or discomfort usually starts behind the breastbone. Pain from angina also can occur in the arms, shoulders, neck, jaw, throat, or back. The pain may feel like indigestion.
    Mar 10, 2013 Angina | NHLBI, NIH
    https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/angina

  • mattnginger author
    11 months ago

    I definitely have migraines even vertigo and be coming sick muscle aches fatigue forgetting words lethargic just a mess. I have a vascular malformation in the brain, that’s the angioma or AVM whatever it is I think it causes some of the neuro symptoms and so my migraines and headaches last longer and can be daily. I feel better reading these comments on getting another Dr

  • Ronan
    11 months ago

    First, see if you can get a second opinion. It is in your head. Migraines are in your head the rest of your body. If you can insist with your doctor for a second opinion I think that may help. I know with myself, migraines usually last up to 3 days and they have changed as I got older. Hormones play a huge part. I hope others will have more suggestion for you.

  • mattnginger author
    11 months ago

    Thank you! I’m going to see if I can see another neuro in January happy holidays!

  • Ronan
    11 months ago

    Same to you. 🙂

    You don’t deserve to be treated that way. It is in your head, physically because it is a migraine. But, psychologically. Not in the least.

    Happy Holidays to you too mattginger.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    11 months ago

    Hi mattginger,

    That’s awful! I’m sorry you had to hear that from your new doctor. I highly doubt it’s all in your head and if it were me, I’d look for another doctor ASAP, and preferably a doctor who is an expert in treating migraine disease and headache disorders. Whether or not you have AVM or angina, migraine disease is real and not all in your head!

    So who are these expert doctors? They are board certified in headache medicine, which is different than being certified in neurology. Neurologists may be fine doctors (most of the time) but have a hard time being experts in one area because they treat so many other conditions such as multiple sclerosis, stroke, epilepsy, Parkinson’s and others. Here is information on how these doctors are different ad how to find one; http://migraine.com/blog/how-are-migraine-specialists-different/ and https://migraine.com/blog/really-find-headache-specialist/.

    I know how frustrating it can be to switch doctors, I’ve done it a number of times. I’m currently seeing my 5th true migraine expert and think I may have hit the jackpot!!

    I hope this helps!
    Nancy

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