Life is a Zoo

Welcome to the newest zoo. Admission is free but in time you will pay a price. Be careful around the animals that live here because you never know what their reaction will be to you; however in time, if you watch, study and retain your knowledge, you might survive this experience and help others as they visit zoos in their areas. Enjoy your stay.

Over the years, I have witnessed the evolution and habits of several creatures that live in my zoo. Maybe you can recognize several in your area. During the four decades of living with these creatures, their existence is spattered with joys, pains, trials and many adjustments to daily events. Euthanasia is not an option but sedation has been necessary for the more severe interactions with members of the faculty. If you identify any of these creatures in your neighborhood, any helpful information would greatly be appreciated to further their lives.

Here in this display is Cassie Chameleon. Cassie is adept in adjusting her interactions with life. Before Cassie came to live here she barely existed on the fringes of society. She is a very colorful member of the family. Cassie watches everything and barely makes a sound. She walks ever so lightly as not to disturb even a fractured eggshell in her pathway. Her movements are slow and deliberate as if every movement is of great pain and intense concentration. She eats in private and does her best to stay out of visual sight. Cassie was discovered the other day wearing an unusual headdress never seen before here. Cassie was sporting headphones. Underneath the sound proof headphones are bright orange earplugs inserted in both ears. This new headdress is also paired with a dark set of sunglasses. Now we understand why she moves so slowly and is so quiet. It appears that when she is in pain, she is attempting to silence noise.

In this sandy enclosure is Ollie Ostrich. Notice her head is buried under the sand in an attempt to hide from issues. She only does this when no medication is helping. She has also been found , unexpectedly, in between the cave walls, crouched down, wings covering her head. It seems that when she does these things, Ollie is trying to avoid lashing out at the other brothers and sisters in her family. Ollie’s greatest downfall is not being able to let words pass by that the other members say without a response so she will hide her head or retreat into her hidden corner to regroup before completely blowing her top. Xanax has only helped in severe circumstances but as this medication transforms her into a new hybrid creature never seen before. Ollie becomes…

Vesuvius Velociraptor. Need we say more. Everybody runs from Vesvi. No place is safe and right now the only thing that the members of the staff know how to do is to give her distance, ginger tea, space (lots of space) and beware of even the wrong look will result in bring in her friend from above….

Buddy Buzzard. Buddy Buzzard gives you the “looks that could kill” when snide comments are made about anything, any sound, any food, you are really ‘better off dead’ before you want to cross Buddy Buzzard. He will not hurt you but you will receive ‘the look’.

We are so thankful and appreciative to our Head Zookeeper, Dakota, as well as his son, as they know best how to execute the best non-medicinal alternative to each of our creatures. Many different medications over the years have only exacerbated our residents and in due process, a great variety of foods, spices and medications have had to be eliminated completely. For Vesvi, Coca-Cola was best for nausea but now after many episodes of mauling staff members, it was learned that Coca-Cola only increased her pain and irritations. Dakota and his son give affection, love, attention in between of all their daily requirements to other functions in the household.

Light, sound, barometric pressure changes, allergies to both foods and medications have created an existence of walking on a tightrope.

Dalia Deer is seen sporadically over the month. Dalia is the heart of this zoo because we recognize in her that she is very appreciative and when the other creatures interact badly with the faculty, she will do everything that she can in her mind and actions to make up for the failures that she witnesses.

There are many other residents in our zoo but there is not enough time to introduce you to them all. We realize that there are circumstances that cannot be changed but we can only resolve to strive for the best and live, love and aim for a day when being diagnosed with Chronic Migraine and other illnesses will not be so prevalent. Each day is a feat of itself and the goal is to reduce the number of episodes of 24 a month down to 0. Its a goal at least and then maybe these animals that live with us now, will one day, be allowed to leave on their own and live life as it was meant to be. Filled with laughter, tears, no regrets, no remorse and hope for the future.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

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