Wasted weekends

I work in an airconditioned office and wondered if that is contributing to my wasted Sunny Saturdays migraines? Now and then I get a migraine, usually it is on the weekend! I do work in an office with no external windows, that is airconditioned, at a computer. Although it is a comfortable temp to work in when the outside temp is high (+27 deg C), is it the change in temp that triggers them?

I am woken by a headache, which proceeds to vomiting and then sleeping for most of the day!

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Comments

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  • Queen-T
    3 years ago

    HI there, i too suffer weekend migraines, they are more common than you think. When i researched it, it has more to do with the fact that your body and your mind are going ninety miles an hour all week, then slow down suddenly at the weekend – especially if you are exhausted and then sleep heavy and lie in bed longer than you would normally. They are very hard to stop. Getting up at the same time at the weekend as you do in the week helps, but i’m afraid the only way to stop the ‘slump effect’ is to work less hours and maybe have short Mediterranean nap type siestas so you don’t get so exhausted by the weekend. Try it and see if it works for you. It does for me. I wish you luck with it. Best wishes T

  • jns192 moderator
    3 years ago

    Queen-T,
    Thank you so much for your feedback. We are glad that your siestas are helping you manage your migraines.
    Thanks for being a part of our community.
    Best,
    Jillian (Migraine.com Team)

  • Joanna Bodner moderator
    3 years ago

    Hi myself001 – Thank you greatly for sharing your story. We are deeply sorry to hear that you are experiencing these symptoms and especially that your work environment may be contributing to it. There are many triggers that may cause migraine such as temperature, lighting, dust, odors, food…the list is unfortunately very extensive! It also varies drastically for every patient, so it becomes very important to track/journal your migraine if you are not already. Here is some information regarding that – https://migraine.com/blog/better-at-tracking-daily-habits/, https://migraine.com/migraine-meter/. Additionally, here is information pertaining specifically to triggers that your story addresses – https://migraine.com/migraine-causes-and-triggers/ and https://migraine.com/blog/migraines-have-triggers/. Lastly, it sounds like you are all too well aware of the difficult symptoms that accompany this condition, but know you are unfortunately not alone when it comes to the nausea/vomiting and sleep that follow (also known as postdrome) https://migraine.com/blog/migraine-hangover/ and https://migraine.com/migraine-symptoms/. I hope you find some of this information helpful. Wishing you all the best at pin pointing what may specifically be your trigger(s). Please be sure to keep us posted on how you are doing! Best regards, Joanna (Migraine.com Team)

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