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50 Years & Older Living With Migraine

50-70 age related Migraine issues

  • By lebell20

    Many Migraine forms discuss topics that pertain to newly diagnosed or the younger crowd, however, many of us had Migraines our entire life and are looking at retirement years wondering how it will affect our life in the future. Are your children grown with children of their own? Have they moved back home? How does this affect your Migraines with the additional stress? Are you still able to care for your self especially during a migraine attack? Has your caretaker or spouse passed away? Are you caring for your elderly parents in addition to your migraines? How do you feel about how the medical community when it comes to your migraines? Have you developed additional health issues and the medication to treat it is worsening your migraines? Are you having difficulty with walking and balance? Have you isolated yourself?

    I’ve suffered with Hemiplegic Migraines for 63 years and gone through many stages of the disease. Children and grandchildren are grown, they’ve move out, back and out again. My parents health declined entered nursing home and pass in 2015-16. My migraines interfered with my ability to participate in many of the events mentioned above and become more of a concern and fear now that I’m getting up in years. Elderly migraine patients have many complaints and concerns, so don’t hesitate to start the conversation.

    I love to hear from other seniors who suffer with migraines with your concerns, tips and ways to combat old age with migraines.

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  • By JulieSchrader

    I’m 53 have had headaches and “car sick” as a 2yr old. My mother only 16/17 sometimes I wonder if that had any effect??
    Flash forward; maigrained we’re not Debilitating until around age 9 or 10 when I started menstruating. 1987 when Imitrex first came out, my life change! Still have to watch out for serotonin syndrome when I need Imitrex too often went through the whole gamut of all the pre-tentative medicines and being that I am only 5 foot tall and a redhead and small frame I feel side effects from every medication.
    After two neurologists and the passing of my childbearing years I now can function on a daily basis. After trying everything that’s come on the market since Glaxo first introduced Imitrex into my life it is still the only thing that I can take and function with keep a job still drive take care of my children etc.
    I do live in fear that when I am old and in a nursing home and there’s no one left to care for me who Lil know to inject me with Imitrex when my eyes don’t look quite right? I fear I will develop some complication like heart problems or something that will prevent nursing home staff from giving me Imitrex plus it’s extremely expensive life without it is terrifying

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    • By lebell20

      Imitrex was my life saver too. I’m also sensitive to other medications. I often think what will I do if I develop cancer and will I be able to withstand kemo treatments. I try to keep busy as I can, so I don’t think of such things, but there are times when you see stuff on the news and your mind just starts to wonder.

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  • By Anonymous

    I am 58 and have rediscovered what I believe are migraines without a headache if that is possible. I starting having “typica” “migraines in my 20s and as I get older the migraines slowly disappeared until Nov of 2017. I now have a headache 1x/.month.for the last 3 month’s but this time around just the nausea/vomiting, sensitivity to light, sound and smell and alwyays ending in a very long nap but no headache! Wondering if there are certain symptoms releated to age or even if one have a Migraine with out a headache?

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    • By Anonymous

      Hi,

      I also suffer from migraine without headache. Primarily, I experience visual auras.

      When I was in my twenties, I had full-blown migraines with aura and headache. Now, most of the time, I just get the aura. These are still considered ‘migraines’.

      If you leave the forum area and read in The Basics, under Migraine Types, you will find Acephalgic Migraines. I suspect this is the type of migraine you are talking about.

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  • By Joann

    I’m 57 years old and have had migraines since I was about 12. I remember having “headaches” and having to lay down and rest. Mother would give me tylenol at the time. But the “headaches” persisted. I will say I don’t remember having any head pain while I was pregnant twice. Now my kids are 34 and 31 x 3 (yes, triplets). I don’t believe the pregnancies have anything to do with the migraines progressing. I believe the 3 vehicle accidents where my head and neck were severely jarred have everything to do with the migraines. I’ve seen several chiropractors over the years and none have helped. I’m seeing an Upper Cervical Chiropractor – will only adjust the neck when it needs it. I rest my neck when I can, I got a new pillow (not sure that’s helping or hurting), still have neck pain (and have had this for a dozen years or so). I think the muscles in my neck are just really sore from having to stretch to accommodate my neck bones that were out of line for so long. I think it will take time for those muscles to pull the other way and release the tension. I have a massager I use all the time to temporarily release the muscle tension – especially during a migraine. But my migraines are now chronic daily. Lovely, right? I have triggers that will bring on a migraine as well: strong cologne/perfume/aftershave/soap/lotion, cigarette smoke, vehicle exhaust, bright lights, strobing lights(even the sun blinking between the trees as I drive by), loud continuous noise, severe heat (over 75 degrees). I know, I’m a freakin’ basket case. But I’m hoping that the chiro will bring me SOME relief. I don’t think he will totally eradicate the migraine since I have so many triggers. I am looking to retire from work at 62 (5 more years!), so many of my triggers will go away or slack off since I won’t be at work.

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    • By Moonlitnight

      Joann, and everyone here, Hello! I am new here as of today and have had headaches since I was 10. Some time after my daughter was born, 30 years ago, I started to get terrible migraines lasting three days, with frightful nausea, and ended up in hospital many times getting units of fluids as I couldn’t even keep a sip of water down. This went on for a few years and then came Imitrex, Amerge, then Zomig nasal. I am now getting migraines every day. My doc thinks it is medication overuse, which it may well be. I use my puffers every day and they are horrendously expensive but I have to work. I am very healthy, mostly vegetarian, and I don’t touch alcohol or anything that isn’t fresh.

      Now, here’s the big puzzle. Three weeks ago, a girlfriend asked me over for a late Christmas dinner…we had turkey, homemade gravy and stuffing, and the usual veggies. The following day, I had one of the WORST migraines ever requiring codeine and two Zomig puffers. But then, I had five days completely migraine-free. This is a 20-year record. On the sixth day, I developed a migraine and have had one every day for two weeks. But why the five free days? It is because of those days that I don’t think I could have medication overuse migraines.

      Last week, I went off all caffeine. Since I have daily headaches anyway, I didn’t have bad withdrawal except tiredness. The migraines continue…and are now ruling my world. That’s my story and I hope that the new monoclonal antibody injection that is coming some time this year (apparently) will provide some relief. Wishing you all the best. Antonia

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  • By Ronan

    lebell2 – Thank you so much for asking this. I’m 47, the youngest of 4. Migraines run in the family and they have definitely changed as I get older. They started out when I was a kid. A couple of extra strength Tylenol did the trick, but not now.

    I recently stayed with a family member who I hadn’t seen for 3 yrs. We talk daily and she knows about the migraines. But she is used to me being able to eat and do anything. Now I have a long list of my don’ts, as they can trigger migraines. I don’t have the answers. But I am curious how everyone takes care of the migraine disease as we age.

    Great question. I anxious to hear other responses.

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  • By 43haaq

    I have had migraines the last 47 years of my life, I’m 54 now and it is getting worse. (20-25 migraine days/month). I took part in the AMGEN CGRP Trial. (without success) so I feel depressed as there is not much in the pipeline for me anymore at the moment. In April I will get a neurostimulator (DUCEST) in my ear, but I do not have much hope that it will work. I have tried nearly every medicine on the market against migraine. I have stopped working. I changed my diet. I have lost all nearly all my friends. The only persons that stick to me is my husband and my parents (My mother is 87 and still has migraines, so she knows what I am talking about). I live in Austria and migraine treatment is very difficult for Austrian doctors/neurologists, as they do not learn anything about it in their study. I had to visit neurologists in Germany that have more knowledge than the Austrians. I have spent thousands of € on the migraine-treatment.

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    • By lebell20

      I totally relate, depression is such a beast to battle. My mother also suffered with migraines and my father had always had a hearing impairment, he then acquired blindness later in life, which made her and I comrades because my husband had RP Usher Syndrome which is blindness and hearing impairment. We were always able to share our frustrations that others couldn’t comprehend from being caretakers. She passed in 2015 and is greatly missed. I think that’s about the only thing that infuriaties me about Hemiplegic Migraines is that it robe me of being capable to care for her when she needed it preventing her from being placed in a nursing home. It’s difficult not to allow that type of depression from consuming oneself. Everyday is another mountain to climb and I try to keep finding something exciting to see on the next level So I don’t go stir crazy.

      I think many of the issues for 50-70’s group differ due to the natural age process and need to be brought to light so forms such as this are seen by the medical community from all parts of the world to help resolve this debilitating disease.

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    • By Moonlitnight

      43, my heart goes out to you. What a horrible situation, to lose one’s friends. People do not understand migraine is not just a “bad headache.” Are you not able to get triptan drugs in Austria or Germany?

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  • By lebell20

    I found it very challenging as I age. Everyday it becomes harder due to normal aged mobility issues, then add into the mix Hemiplegic Migraines making it extremely difficult to do anything, plus my dependable help (my children) are also growing older and have their own daily issues, which increases your stress levels and isolation. Sometimes, I think it be nice to join Seniors clubs, but that would involve exposure to the intensity of perfume, lights and noises and to be honest at this time in my life I’m not interested in anymore drama. My migraines no longer plague me with throbbing head pain as much as they do with sharp shooting pain that almost slices your head in half. It’s also becoming increasingly difficult to get my eyes to focus from close to far away, which is a normal age related issue, but my right side is always worse. Many of us don’t think far enough into the future to prepare for migrating migraines with old age. I’m hoping by getting those of us who are in their 50-70s to share those concerns and issues so we can be better prepared for a more positive experience as we grow older. One thing I have found to be a blessing is FaceTiming, my daughter try’s to FaceTime me while shopping or family events and things like funerals to keep me included. It truly is a blessing when you can’t go due to illnesses.

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  • By Anonymous

    My migraines started during my graduate school years, when I was about 24 y/o. At that time, I experienced auras (mostly a ‘blind spot’ in one eye) followed by debilitating heachaches.

    Now, while I do periodically experience headaches, they generally seem like fairly ‘normal’ headaches. But, I also experience auras without headache now.

    I haven’t found any triggers. Still don’t really know why they are happening. I suppose they are stress-related.

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  • By manwithmigraine

    At this stage all we can do is get an annual Brain Scan Image of some type.

    Then hope that Big Pharma will allow us to purchase the new “Bespoke” “EpiPen” Abortives. Kind of like the DHEA protocols but easier to purchase —easier to setup for quick access and hopefully—Less Cost.

    I take great care of my body. Food intake at 57 years old is very guarded. 3 miles a day of walking—-Lots of veggies—fish and lean meats
    I take great care of my daily meditation. The sounds of Nature play on my phone while I drift for 30 min.
    I take great care of my surroundings at home and Socially.
    I take great care NOT to do Alcohol or Drugs…Only my scripts
    I take great care to mitigate all resources such as a daily –weekly journal. Forums like this, etc…

    Bottom line is with all of this. Migraine will get you. It’s called life and all of the bad and GOOD that it brings…even good times bring migraine…Most people don’t know that.

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    • By lebell20

      Since 1995, my neurologist sends me to get a MRI, like you said it’s about the only thing to do for future generations. Your comment got me thinking how great it be if a migraine form would create a app for us to keep daily journals so all one would need to do is check off a box with symptoms, blood pressure, glucose, triggers such as weather, smells, food exposures and daily stress etc. etc.. It would be interesting to see all the information complied across the world in scientific studies. It probably blow their minds to see we could forecast weather better then meteorologist. Your migraine journal is a great idea.

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    • By LisaP3

      I really like the Migraine Buddy app. It has a lot of the features you mentioned, and in addition to being helpful to the users, the data gathered is being used for research/analysis of the population. And it’s free!

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  • By Jo1950

    I’m 67 years old and I have had the same migraine with aura since my teens, no much has changed. Just had an EEG and MRI with always the same results. I also have temporal lobe ellipse and Menieres and I am trying to manage my “golden years” living alone, lol. I made it thru breast cancer and am in my 5th year of recovery.

    Currently have been on Zonegran for a year for seizures/migraine, Pamelor for anxiety and panic, Klonopin for seizures and sleep.

    Lately my migraines have been changing in frequency and timing. Now I wake up to find the nausea, headache and dizziness so I loose out on taking Imitrex to stop it. My neurologist has asked me to increase the Zonegran and the Pamelor which I am trying but it just makes me more drowsy and out of it.

    Doing the best I can.

    Well, thanks for reading,

    Jo

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    • By lebell20

      Jo I hope your feeling well today. I to was on the same medication at one time, pamalor was a nightmare, it also knocked me out. Cancer is my biggest fear because of medication conflict or how it would affect my HM. It must have been horrible for you to struggle with so many things against you. Thank goodness it’s over and you are cancer free now because you surely got a lot on your plate.

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  • By Martin

    If I may just sneak in here as i am 47 but i have had migs for most of my life. As a child I was diagnosed with grinding my jaw, but I knew that wasn’t the case, but we never pursued it. I don’t remember migs appearing again until i was an adult and I started to get really bad shoulder and neck pain which would creep up into my head. I though it was muscular and never did anything about it. At the time I was getting 1 every few weeks.

    It wasn’t until my mid 30’s when I met my wife that she diagnosed them as migraines. I wrote a blog (anothermigraine.blogspot.com) for a while to help me deal with it so i wont go through the whole long story here, but needless to say that I tried every preventative and every cure. Eventually my neurologist said that he had run out of options and no longer wanted to see me.

    That was about 3 years ago. Since then I have actually started to have some success with feverfew. I was up to 15 migs a month with another 10 background headaches, so pretty much every day hurt to some degree. After 4 months on feverfew i am down to 6 migs per month with 15 background headaches and the trend is still dropping (I keep a lot of charts and graphs). My quality of life has improved hugely as a result of this. So there really is always hope.

    I wish you all to find your magic cure. Never give up!
    Martin

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    • By Moonlitnight

      Hello Martin, thanks for that info. I have also tried it all, except for butterbur, so I just ordered some. The feverfew didn’t work for me but your post reminded me of butterbur.

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    • By Martin

      I take one 100mg tablet every morning after my breakfast. I buy them from a places like healthspan or holland & barrett (no endorsement intended but they are cheap and reliable).

      I am currently down to 5 migs and 12 background headaches. Most of the background headaches can be vanquished with a simple cup of coffee. I only drink caffeine when I have a headache so it acts as a cure and not a trigger. That is so close to my baseline of 15 days headaches per month, something that I have never been below.

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    • By lmlahlum

      Thank you! Just by chance I had an appointment with a new neurologist this morning. She said to go ahead and try the feverfew. It does help some. I tried it years ago, but I never knew how much to take, and was not consistent with it..

      She did say, however, to avoid butterbur (which someone else was going to try). It’s hard on the liver, and if you already take medications that are processed through the liver (which I do), best avoided.

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  • By lebell20

    For those of you who suffer with Hemiplegic Migraines might like information if you new or unaware that it’s considered rare. Scroll down to related disorders FHM. This is good information to print out can carry in case of emergencies. ER takes it a little more seriously when they see NORD and GARD

    https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/alternating-hemiplegia-of-childhood/

    https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/10768/hemiplegic-migraine

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  • By Jo1950

    Thank you Lebell20 for your validation and kindness for what I went thru with cancer. Where I did not have chemo, I did have radiation.

    Thank you for sending out the links above for Hemiplegic Migraines. I seem to fit most of the symptoms but was never diagnosed as anything other than migraine with aura. I do suffer from daily Nystagmous and balance issues which I have to laugh at my neurologist who feels that the Nystagmous will magically go away if I have physical therapy specifically targeted for this. The Nystagmous started in 2004 when my balance issues became unmanageable. I sought out many opinions from many neurologists who put me on all the meds on the market and nothing worked. I went to see a prominent neuro-otologist who studied at John’s Hopkins and he said I had Menieres but sent me back to neurology for the daily balance and daily dizziness and recurring migraine with aura. I gave up in 2011.

    Then in 2014 I went on Depakote due to frequent seizures and that helped with so many things. It stopped migraine, seizures, panic and anxiety, but I continued to have the inbalance and Nystagmous. In 2016 discovered I developed Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease probably from the Depakote and was taken off of it. A year went by and found a new neurologist who agreed to put me on Zonegran. He wanted me to go on Vimpat but due to all the reported horrid side effects, I opted to go on Zonegran. Now I am increasing the Zonegran to 75 mg and with my sensitivities to medications it’s causing over sedation, but I have to do something for these frequent migraines.

    Have been doing daily meditation, biofeedback to help reduce stress load. I just went thru a criminal trial where I was a witness to a brutal attack of my neighbor, then I had to move due to a rental increase, sprained my knee during the move so now can’t exercise, and I do not like my new living situation and lost my routine and circle of friends which was when the daily migraine hit me.

    Thank you for listening *smiles*

    Jo

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  • By Jojiieme

    Hello everyone – a sunny, warm good morning from Queensland, Australia!
    I’ve just had a startling few days which have jolted me back almost 40 years – I’m 61 now – and in the process learnt some migraine connections you might not realise. This is a great place to share, so thank you!
    My migraines change with the seasons; it’s warm, humid and bright so this is my worst time of year and usually I’m either going into or coming off a multi-day attack.
    Head pain is often of the short, sharp, jabbing variety. Sometimes, I’ll have nausea, and/or diarrhoea and/or disorientation and/or aphasia and/or sound distortion and/or various visual disturbances including haloes and/or my body bits won’t work (if I can find them) (I have Alice in Wonderland syndrome)…. Oh, the list goes on. It’s all complicated by arthritis in various fracture lines (including skull fractures).
    And didn’t menopause make your migraine syndrome an absolute joy?? *sarcasm*
    (I’ve just realised I’m always smelling burning rubber. That’s another symptom)
    Ok: Thursday afternoon, excruciating gut pain in a specific right-side spot. No other symptoms at all. I think, I need to drink more water and over the next couple of hours I drink just over a litre of water. Everything’s normal, I go to bed. 13 hours, I wake still in agony. Diverticulitis or appendicitis? I ring 13-HEALTH, because still no other symptoms, then I go to Emergency with all my meds. (This is a good time to remind you I’m allergic to most meds, most foods, and some environmental stuff.) amazing luck: Emergency is almost empty!! (I’m still there for over 8 hours)
    I’m seen by 2 emergency docs, and 4 gastric surgeons. No-one can work out why I’m a symptomatic, or how to handle my allergies, let alone my migraines. (Did you know you can be on oxycodone and still develop a migraine??! Thank goodness for my preventives which got work on the forehead muscle fibres and capillary cell electricals [i don’t really understand it, I think that’s how they work]) Anyway.
    They finally work out: I have a dermoid cyst, about 3cm. (Yes, I recognise the pain from my 20s) NO SIGN OF IT 3MONTHS AGO at my last OvCa ultrasound. It has a friend, a lone pocket of diverticulitis just near the ovary, inflamed. And, at the end of my bowel -do I have Crohns in the family? – there are signs of early IBD. Again, no signs of any of these 3 months ago, and no symptoms at all.
    PCOS and ovarian cysts including post-menopausal cysts often go with migraines. Crohn’s includes migraines. IBD includes migraines. Apparently it’s all in the genetics for each.

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  • By ScottReno

    It is comforting find this site and to hear I am not alone. Migraines run in my family. My dad had them, my mother and two of my sisters have them. I keep a diary and that, plus medication, has helped me minimize my migraines. My triggers are strong smells, stress, and a variety of foods, including chocolate 🙁 .

    I will be 60 soon. My migraines started in my late 20’s and continued through my mid 30’s. Then they stopped until I was in my mid 50’s, when they came back with a vengeance. I had one that I powered through, but the second one sent me to the emergency room. A CAT scan, an MRI and spinal tap later, I was diagnosed with a bad headache. Based on the prior one I told the doctors about, they said possibly a migraine.

    Two months and several “bad headaches” later my doctor officially gave me a diagnosis of chronic migraines so I could get time off at work whenever I had them. My problem was none of the managers at work understood how bad a migraine could be. My migraines were compounded by the stress of losing money from unpaid sick time and being pressured to make up for time missed when I came back to work. Finally my manager suggested I see about getting disability.

    I had seen co-workers go through the stress of trying to get disability approved at this company. Basically, they denied it until you hired a lawyer and threatened to sue them. I didn’t want to go through the process, especially after seeing co-workers with a disability which could be proven by x-rays or other physical evidence, get denied and have to pay a lawyer just to get short term disability. You can imagine what I would have gone through with only my word to prove how debilitating my migraines were.

    I didn’t want to jump through hoops, plus I didn’t have a lot of bills, my wife was retired and getting Medicare, so I left my really well paying job for an unknown future.

    I am better off for it. The stress is gone, so very few stress-related migraines. I am still somewhat fragrance sensitive and most of my migraines are started by strong smells. I work for a friend, full time during his busy season, part-time for the rest of the year. He understands my migraines and lets me work in a darkened room, at my own pace when they occur or take the day off if they’re really bad. Yes, I am making a lot less than I was before, but I have more time for what matters in life and that, I believe, helps keep the migraines at bay. If it doesn’t there’s always sumatriptan 🙂

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  • By Casper6

    Hi Scott I fee your pain. I was fortunate that I didn’t need to work full time, my husband did. Then when we had children he insisted I didn’t need to work. But I did part time till I had our 3rd child. (Sorry off subject) However, I would get very bad migraines where I had to call into work, and call some out to watch the kids. I even had to go to my work one time just to prove I was not lying. I was there only 1 hour before they sent me home. After that, they never doughty me again. I think you are very brave for choosing your health over making a lot of money. You are so much better off, and like you say, enjoy your life and family. Also, don’t be afraid to take the imitrex. (Sumatriptan) If I didn’t have that, I would be very sick and miss out on a lot of my life. Take care.

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    • By ScottReno

      Hi Casper, The side effects of sumatriptan are almost as bad as most of my migraines. I especially hate the tightness in my chest. My pain level has to be pretty high before I will take one. Even then I break it in half.

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  • By lebell20

    After reading many of your comments I can’t help from wondering how do you manage daily activities when down with a migraine attacks. Do you depend on others or you by yourself? How do you get your groceries, medication and other supplies? Do you do most of your shopping on line ? Do your local grocery & pharmacies stores deliver? Do you depend on banking on line? Do you stil drive or do you depend on taxis, buses or Uber? Do you live in the city or suburbs? Are you eligible for Meals on Wheels?

    I live in the country and my daughter isn’t to far that I can call on her for emergency supplies if needed. My husband is blind so he can’t drive nor would he attempt a taxi or Uber. I haven’t been in major stores in years due to strong odors and over perfumed ladies. Walking for any length of time is difficult or lifting my legs up and down to get in or out of the car more then 3 times is hard. I have a scooter, but it’s difficult opening store doors by myself, plus the younger crowd get very angry if I’m in front of them. The scooter is also difficult to load in and out of our truck. I tried many of the ones in the store, but usually end up with one someone just used and the battery dies somewhere in the back of the store, it easier not to go. Major items I buy I order online. Our local grocery store delivers thank got and it’s great. We can depend on two different sub shops that deliver fairly decent food. I don’t know what I do without them. I often think about moving, but I get to afraid the area is to far from my neurologist or the grocery store doesn’t offer delivery. We are to young for some state or County programs, but to disable to do it on our own. Getting rides to and from doctors office is hard when friends and family has to work and it’s expensive to hire a taxi or Uber regularly.

    Years ago, I learned about local service through the Department of rehabilitation when my husband entered the program for mobility & work training, so I’m fortunate. I do wonder if many of you reached out to your local services for help. I understand it hard due to the stigma Migraines have, but, maybe, by us discussing the issue we came bring awareness to those in the field of help, how difficult it is to tend to daily tasks. Many suggestions might benefit others who are just confronted with these situations.

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    • By ScottReno

      lebell20. I mostly power through the day. My migraines never really go away unless I take sumatriptan which make me feel bad in other ways. For bad attacks I usually curl up in bed, after taking the batteries out of the clock. If I can’t work I go home.

      I live near Downtown, eight minutes from work, can walk to the grocery store and many restaurants. Back when I worked at the big corporation my daily migraines were much worse. Now that I have the freedom to set my own hours it is easier to manage them so they don’t get bad too often.

      I avoid perfumes, use no or low scent products.

      Keeping a diary of my migraines helps. I record the time they start, or woke me up. What triggered them. What helped, What didn’t help. The highest level of pain. And when they ended.

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  • By Purplelady63

    I am glad to find this forum, I am 68, my migraines came back with a bang when I turned 62, by the time I was 63 I had to retire on disability the migraines were so bad. I have tried everything in the book that I can, due to a heart arrhythmia there are drugs I cannot take. I had a few from 28-62 but after that, it has been all downhill.

    I always thought that being retired would be fun, but not so much when you have migraines that put you in bed for 10-12 days.

    A year ago I had a migraine so bad that it affected my right side, dragging my right leg and difficulty walking; it took me 5 months to get my mobility back. I really never knew migraines could do such a thing.

    I have also had 16 TIAs [transent ischemic attacks or Minnie strokes] and this also makes my medication options limited. I truly thought I had a stroke a year ago but the tests showed none, I was relieved, to say the least.

    thankyou for starting this forum.

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  • By HoffmanJudy

    I have been dealing with migraines since my teens. (could have had them as a child also. I recall having very bad headaches but my family thought that I just didn’t want to help with chores, like raking and burning leaves.) Would get bad headaches after Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners. My mom again thought I was trying to avoid the clean up from the meals. My aunt prepared the turkey for both of those meals and used different spices than my mom did.

    Now at 66, I’m told not to use the Maxalt pills that at least 50% of the time helped the headaches. I’m told that I could have a stroke or heart attack from those meds.I get the migraines about ever 7 to 10 days and I lose about 3 days with each one. I’ve been on a disability since age 62 so I’m no longer worried about losing my job but my quality of life stinks. The only thing I get relief with is Vicodin and Phenergan for nausea. On day two If I’m still not getting relief, my family, Dr. will treat it with 2 injections, 1 Nubian and 1 Phenergan. Usually, that stops it but then I have what I call a migraine hangover the 3 day. I’m just useless.

    In my teens, the dr. said that when I had babies my hormones would change and the headaches would lessen. They were 10 x’s worse through the pregnancies and didn’t go away. Then they said that I should look forward to menopause again telling me that the shift in hormones would be the cure. Obviously, that didn’t happen either. I’ve resigned myself to the fact that they’ll not go away ever.

    Thank you for providing this outlet.

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  • By Moonlitnight

    Hello Judy, Ah, I feel for you. Have you ever been to the blog at nyheadache dot com? The notion that triptans cause stroke just isn’t backed up by science. I have been a medical writer and researcher for over 35 years and also have yet to find anything to support this notion. Dr. Mauskop who runs the clinic wrote a blog post referencing this and I took a copy to my doctor. I am also 66 and he continues to prescribe for me.

    I too heard about the easing of migraines as one gets older due to hormone changes. I just went through five weeks of daily migraines. (Another myth is that triptans can cause rebound. That is also addressed on the New York Headache Clinic’s blog.) My doctor seemed to think rebound was the cause until I showed him this blog post as well and just to prove a point somehow went a full week without a hint of a migraine after I left his office. I was on the same diet every day, and very careful to spread caffeine out every 2.5 to 3 hours. I am just trying to repeat this.

    If I could find out why I get these occasional long breaks, it might help isolating the cause. The weather didn’t change during the two periods I have gone over five days without a migraine. Hang in there! (Have you ever had a long break?)

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  • By Casper6

    Hi Judy I have heard pretty much the same as you about migraines going way or being less severe. I to have had migraines since I was a teen. My grandmother had migraines, and she told me when I would have children they should go away. Guess what? They didn’t go away, they got worse. Now I am in menopause, Most of the time my migraines are not as sever as they was in my teens to 30’s, but have increased in how many I have a month. I get about 12+ a month.

    I am sorry to hear what medication worked for you, you no longer should take. That does raise concerns oh how my migraines will be treated as I grow older. I have missed enough of family times due to migraines.

    I pray for a medial break through, that will help out many that suffer with this curse.
    I hope you can find more relief so you can enjoy life.

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  • By ddowlen

    I totally feel for all of you. I suffered for 30 years and found a company that had a migraine product. No migraines in 4 months and counting now. They also let me try it first before I had to pay full price which was awesome and unheard of. I never knew what it was like not to have a migraine. I had them daily. Never give up hope that you will find the one thing someday that will finally get you relief you deserve. Doctors don’t have all the answers sadly. I am praying fo you all! I wish something could be figured out to help everyone.

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    • By Purplelady63

      Hi, what is the product that you found, I just had a very uneventful visit with a neurologist and am very down about the entire visit. I guess I was hoping for some kind of help, no luck. I sure do need a break from the pain. if it were not for the love and care of my husband, life would be unbearable at times. It seems strange to me that the medical profession is so uncaring about people with migraines, I have also tried everything they have given me, but when I tell them it does not work they think I am lying. why would I lie about that, man I want it to work please, but no sadly it seems that the so-called treatments are very unreliable and very few people seem to find something that really works. I have been 38 years as a nurse and no help available and medical professionals that do not care, I have to wonder just what they are teaching today. Defiantly they are not in the profession to care anymore. Money seems to be the draw, not medical intelligence.

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  • By Moonlitnight

    I don’t know if anyone here is taking collagen or protein powder. I have discovered that my daily fish collagen powder was the cause of the daily migraines. I also found refs to this on the web. Also, when I stopped daily triptans I noticed that I was less “up” and happy than I usually am, despite very challenging circumstances having lost the love of my life. Hardly surprising since zolmitriptan is a 5-HTP receptor agonist allowing more serotonin into the brain. I seem to have resolved this weird depressed feeling with two scoops (doses) of magnesium powder, one in the morning and one before bed.

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  • By ddowlen

    I know they don’t want us talking about products on here but I sooooo understand your pain, I really do. I also agree with your doctor comments. 30 years was waaaay too long to suffer with something you would think doctor’s could fix. The product is called URlifeback. Might be worth a try Purplelady. Again still praying for all of us to one day find that relief!!!

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  • By Purplelady63

    thanks for the info, I will check it out, any help we can get is a plus, not everything works for all, praying for all on this site and those who have not yet found us. I know God has a plan for my life I am 68, my body is any way my mind is still in my 20s and this inactivity is awful.

    Linda

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  • By Casper6

    I have a question for those who live near Omaha,NE. I have had migraines for years. My personal doctors told me my daily medication has quite working. They have advised me to find a new specialist. I need some personal referrals of for a new Migraine Specialist, Can anyone send me any names of neurologist/migraine doctor? My doctor did give me some names, but I like to hear from patients. Since my last one died years ago, not sure who to go to.

    Thanks for your help..

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  • By ddowlen

    HI casper6, I hate to say it but I have lost trust in the doctors. I began looking into natural stuff that didn’t make my hair fall out and make me feel crappy from all of the side effects.I found a product that worked for me after 30 years of suffering every single day with a migraine. I consider myself at the extreme end of sufferers. Might be worth a try for some of you and the best part was its all natural (no side effects) and they offered a trail bottle. I read all of these posts on this site and it breaks my heart to know most of you are still miserable. Look them up. It might be your answer. Doctors and meds did NOTHING for me for years!!! The name is URLifeBack and I stand by it. It gave me back my life and I’m grateful. Best of luck to all of you and sorry I don’t have a referral but this could be the answer. Good luck!

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  • By jems

    Sympathies to all those suffering with migraine (and of course other debilitating health issues). Wish I had some words of wisdom, have tried so many different treatments over the years – to no avail.

    I’m 55 and migraines returned with a vengence at 43 when my periods stopped. Previously I had them from c.9 years old to c.25 years old – assume my estrogen / hormone profile settled until menopause started – the estrogen loss has lowered the migraine threshold – and affected the nervous system and heart.

    A few days ago during a monster migraine I had the most terrifying experience of what must be Tachycardia.

    Over the past few years palpitations seem to now be a feature of my migraines – but the palpitations I had the other day were off the charts – and my heart was thumping out of my back too.

    Does anybody have any advice please – I’m terrified of this new symptom to hideous migraine attacks.

    With thanks for any comments.

    jems
    London, UK

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    • By lebell20

      After reading many comments at various Migraine sites, I’ve come to the conclusion that there are no words to comfort those who suffer with this miserable disease. The one thing that gives me relief is to see so many experiencing the same symptoms as me. Hemiplegic Migraines are rare with odd symptoms.

      I had endometriosis so at the age of 35 both my ovaries and uterus was removed leading into a surgical menopause. Doctors thought that would solve the issues, but it only worsen the condition especially when they tried estrogen then progesterone. It was a nightmare for 5 years, we tried every strength and type until I just had enough and stopped. The doctors warned me of the horrible health issues I faced if I didn’t take estrogen. Well I’m 63 and still here and still have the same number of HM attacks. I did acquire Hashimoto Hypothroidsim which affects my blood pressure and palpitations. At first the palpitations are frightening at first, but I’ve gotten use tho them now. I’ve been on blood pressure medication for so long that I built up a tolerance to it and they changed it to Metoprolol, but my pressure is normally very low then spikes extremely high so they added Losartan. When they added Losartan a unexpected surprise happened. My right side gained strength, my walking and breathing improved. Knock on wood, after 3 years I feel safe enough to say my HM is in control. It’s not gone, but the symptoms are less severe that only I’m aware what’s happening. I don’t want to get to cockey and jinxes myself.

      I’ve heard so many crazy comments out of doctors that I ignore most, one once said that if I had more sex and tried to enjoy it my pain and endo would go away. 🙄 Endo, thyroid, strokes, high blood pressure and Migraines run prevalent in the women in my family, so it’s all genetic.

      Thyroid issues are associated with heart and Migraines. Most doctors don’t run through thyroid function test, so I get that check out. Also, start keeping a blood pressure log with palpations noted. Stay clear of caffeine or caffeinated products and try lowering your salt intake. I was advised to try keeping it around 2000 mg a day. I personally cannot ingest any form of alcoholic beverages at all, every now and then on good days I might sip some good wine, but never on a regular basis. I also make sure all my daily medications are taken the same time daily. It’s important that time release medication such as blood pressure medication, is steadily released in my system any fluctuation can trigger a HM attack or the palpitations. I also rotate daily heavy activity which requires a lot of walking to every other day and on the other days I schedule very light work such as bookkeeping. This gives my body time to relax and recuperate, it sounds crazy, but since I aged high activity is physically stressful for me due to the weakness on my right side and it affects the blood pressure.

      I hope this is helpful. It’s extremely important not to get discouraged by doctors comments, most are idiots, but their are a few who love the science of medicine and love people like us who keep them on their toes. We are a challenging to their careers and we teach them something they didn’t know, so just walk out on those who are on the treadmill paycheck. When doctors get sick they expect excellent care and their patients deserve the same. I think one of the best things about being in my 60’s is I don’t feel the need to put up with anyone’s crap anymore and I walk out. The stress isn’t beneficial and I no longer put myself through the worry of others feelings. I have to be more concerned about my blood pressure.

      Hope today is a good one for you and everyone. Feel comfort in knowing we all share the frustration of this horrible illness.
      Lebell20

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    • By jems

      Thanks for replies – I haven’t taken Triptans for years now as they make the palpitations worse – also the side effects were as bad as the migraine. Apparently Triptans are not recommended for post-menopausal women due to the heart artery narrowing effect.

      Strangely, sometimes when I took Triptans and on the rare occasion it did manage to stop a migraine, I was left feeling quite high – it must have temporarily boosted serotonin levels.

      Lebell20, often you read that post-uterus/ovary removal migs can settle due to no hormonal fluctuations – but that’s not the case is it for you.

      After all these years, I’ve never been diagnosed with the type of migraine I get – I’ve experienced a whole range and they change and mutate.

      In my youth I had aura, sight loss, speech loss, right sided weakness, violent vomiting – since meno I’ve occasionally had vertigo mig with the room flying around – now mainly excruciating right sided head/neck knots/shoulder pain / extreme nausea, can’t stand upright, stomach shuts down completely, can’t eat for days – then it takes days to recover.

      Triggers are many – just being alive really! – the main factor is the loss of hormone profile – I take low dose transdermal HRT but struggle so badly with the progesterone element – that can create mig too – I know I am much worse without the HRT though.

      Absolute living hell.

      My mother had mig up until she died at 83.

      Depressed doesn’t even begin to describe it …

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  • By Moonlitnight

    Ah @jems, I am so sorry. I am one of those who has no problems with triptans, which instantly abort my impending migraine. Before triptans, I used to wind up two or three times a month in hospital for units of fluids as I couldn’t even keep one sip of water down. My daughter, who also has migraines, cannot take triptans for the same reasons as you.

    The only problem I have noticed recently, after being on them daily for five weeks, is that now that I only require them once a week, I have this overwhelming sense of depression and impending doom. Hardly surprising since I have been flying high on the increased serotonin. I have managed to control my migraines after 40 or so years of having them three times a week or more, by stopping the use of collagen supplements and protein powder. (It is tough finding protein when you are vegetarian and beans give you a migraine, so I have been using vegetarian protein powder for years.) I have also been taking magnesium powder twice daily.

    Keeping it all crossed for you and everyone else here that you will suddenly find the solution, like I appear to have done (touch wood) after decades of neurologist visits, hospitalizations, loss of family life, and so on. There IS hope. xo

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  • By TxColleen

    Has anyone’s migraines gotten BETTER as they’ve aged? First a history: I had my first migraine at age 28 with my first bout of morning sickness with my first pregnancy. Upon reflection, it was a classic migraine, nausea, aura, vision problems, etc. After seeing a neurologist and ruling out a brain tumor (!), I was not able to do anything for the migraines I continued to have at least monthly while pregnant. I knew if I could make myself go to sleep immediately (usually pretty doable) and slept for 2 hours at least, I would wake without the headache. After pregnancy I usually used Imitrex. And had migraines maybe 9 times a year. My most significant food trigger is Dr. Pepper!

    After my mother at first denied having any migraines in the family, she later referred to her mother’s (my gmother) “sick headaches,” and even later her own experience with aura only. Since that time, my own daughter has experienced migraines (that’s four female maternal decendents) as well as a maternal nephew who began his migraines as a child with stomach aches.

    Anyway, now that I am 62, my migraines have evolved (blessedly!) to aura ONLY! For at least the last 10 years I will begin a migraine in my usual way, sometimes feeling my arms are “disassociated” from my body and then vision disturbances before the aura sets in. Just in case, I will take Excedrin for Migraines and lay down in a quiet room. But again, my aura DOES NOT turn into a migraine.

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  • By Casper6

    Hi TXColleen Your story is diffident from others I have heard. All I can tell you is my experience and my grandma’s. My migraines started as a teen. My Grandma’s started about like you. (Not sure if it was before she had my dad or not) I had migraines during my first trimester, then they went away till after my kids was born. As I have aged my severity has decreased buy the number of migraines increase. My grandma headaches did get better as she got older. I hope I follow in her foot steps. Happy they are better for you.

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  • By simle58

    Just set up my account. I’m turning 60 end of April and hope the newsletter will have info on clinical trials of CGRP medication for me to participate in. My headaches seem to be related to trigeminal nerve damage from needle trauma following gum graft I had June 2016 (numbing injections). Headaches seem to be driven more by overactive nerves in my head. I have seen some improvement since cutting out caffeine (constricts blood vessels). I’ve also had 4 acupuncture treatments which seems to have made symptoms less intense. Nerve pain radiates from gums and teeth and radiates upward, sometimes I have ringing in ears. I also see some benefit in YouTube videos on hypnosis for migraine, I listen at bedtime with earbuds. My last resort, when aspirin, tylenol, ibuprofen fail, is imitrex. I also have RX for gabapentin for nerve pain. When I read about CGRP related headaches, that info best describes the nature of my headaches. Meantime, I practice healthy lifestyle, get enough exercise, sleep and NO alcohol, even 1 glass of wine is out—guaranteed headache otherwise regardless of headache OTCs.

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  • By JaneInPain

    Just signed up today. Hello everyone and thank you for being here. I found you by googling rebound, Imitrex. I’m 62 and my migraines started at age 9. They run in my family, mostly in females. Upon menopause, migraines disappeared for all other female relatives before me. I haven’t been so lucky. I’ve been taking Imitrex since 1995. Somehow, I am on daily Imitrex for around 15 years. I wake with horrible migraines, take 50 mg. Imitrex immediately. Depending on the day, I take another 25 or 50 mg. Then 25 mg. at bedtime, which for a while worked beautifully on the fierce morning migraines. That ended. Bottom line: I’m so sure I’m in rebound mode. My pain specialist doesn’t believe in Imitrex rebound nor the other warnings. I had full work-up of heart, blood vessels, etc. 2 years ago because I’m worried about stroking or a heart attack. I’m motivated to get off Imitrex because I’m thinking (and I’m feeling optimistic after reading your posts) that I need to cut back slowly because – and this is important – I seem to need it more and more often. I’ve tapered before on steroid taper but it only lasted a few days. Something’s got to give here. I’m in Imitrex Hell.

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  • By Casper6

    Hi JanelnPain Welcome to our blog, (I guess that is what you’d call this.) Yes Imitex will cause rebound headaches. In my case I take 100mg for a migraine. But if I take Imitex for 3 days in a row, it will cause rebound. That is why I have a few different abortive med’s I can take for my migraines. I would go to another doctor that specializes in migraines. I think they would be able to get you off, and get your migraines under control. I too, am in menopause and still get them. I really don’t see my life with out migraines, however I will do what it take to manage them.

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  • By lindaann

    So glad someone started this forum.I am 60, was promised by several friends with migraine that mine too would go away or at least get better after “the change”. That has not happened. In fact, I think I have gotten steadily worse. I am definitely chronic. I don’t know if any of you have this but I have a daily persistent background headache, all the time,24/7 that never goes away. Then everyday, I wonder will it dial up enough to reach migraine status. Lately I have been hovering around a 3.5 out of 5 on my headache scale.I usually medicate at 4 so that is a pretty marginal place to be. I have taken a leave of absence from work and am considering early retirement or going back very part-time. I am beginning to feel like all this daily pain is literally clouding my thinking. My pain specialist is nice but really can’t do much more for me. Botox, nerve blocks, preventatives have all failed. I have tried elimination diets with no luck. Oh and history, first migraine was at 11 and then I got them hormonally for many years. Was chronic in university and grad school, did better when I had my babies and became chronic again in my 40’s. My grandma had them and I have a cousin with severe migraine. One daughter gets them with her periods and the other has had 2 in her life. How to keep going, sometimes its one day at a time with me. I too have aging parents to care for.

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  • By Kgubbins

    Hi all. This is my first post. I’m 53, started getting migraines at age 11/12 and they subsided in my 20’s and 30’s only to return with a vengeance in my 40’s. I’ve been taking Zomig (zolmatriptan) successfully, but was shocked yesterday when I was attempting to refill my prescription at the pharmacy- the pharmacist told me that there was a shortage of the zolmatriptan oral rapid-melts and that most of the manufacturers won’t have more until next year. He told me he could give me the pill form, but that the pill is not as fast-acting as the rapid-melt. This is freaking me out. I live in Alberta, Canada – has anyone else been affected by this shortage, and if so, any advice? Thanks!

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  • By Jo1950

    Hi Kgubbins ~ I have been having the same issue with other medications here in the US, which is scary. Not sure what it is all about. Ran into this last year too, having to suddenly scramble to find alternative medications. So far, my triptans here in the US (Maxalt) have been filled without issue. Can you order across the border?

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  • By Kgubbins

    Thanks Jo1950 – your response is much appreciated. I’ll look into cross-border ordering. And i’ll ask my doc about Maxalt as an alternative and check its availability.

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  • By Kgubbins

    Thanks Lindaann. As it happens, I had a migraine today and took one of the Zomig pills (regular, not sublingual) and was able to get it to subside. That was a huge relief – literally and figuratively 🙂. I appreciate the support from folks like you and Jo; glad I found this forum.

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  • By klynn

    I have had migraines on and off for 30 years since my second child was born. Fioricet was a big help in the beginning but recently I begin taking Botox shots because I became addicted to the Fioricet. I am posting this because you can seemingly take Fioricet for long periods of time and not have a problem with it but if you’re under stress it can cause an addiction. My neurologist cut me down with phenobarbital over a two-week. Very uncomfortable and made me feel sick for 2 weeks. at the time I stop taking Fioricet I was taking only a half a pill a day! That just shows how seductive the drug is. I would urge people not to be go to to Fioricet for relief!

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  • By Missy75

    Hi everyone. New here & reading over some of your comments on Easter Sunday because I have a dull pain on right side of my head since early morning. Haven’t treated yet (generic Treximet & Imitrex), as i feel like I’ve been over-medicated last 3 months. My situation similar to lindaann. Turning 60 this year & have been on daily maintenance drugs for migraines for past 14 years. Breakthrough headaches have been more frequent, resulting in me taking more meds. My dr. (neurologist/migraine specialist), has me trying Imitrex for 1st 2 days of headache, then 2 mild steroids on day 3 to try & break the headache cycle. I seem to only be able to go 2 or 3 days or so, then headache comes back & it starts all over again! But most days, I’ve got some kind of headache or head pain. Very upsetting, especially when I hear people & even my dr. say they should decrease in frequency as I get older.

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  • By Jo1950

    Hi Nay91 ~ Where can I access this information. I tried to look up MigraineNoMore.com and the website does not exist.

    Thank you.

    Debbie

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  • By Tim Banish

    Read several of these posts and decided to give my input. I am 67 and started having migraines around age 38. My typical migraine starts in the middle of the night, the pain will wake me up, my head pounding. The first medicine I ever took was aspirin or Excedrin extra strength. I’d have to go hide in the dark bathroom. Then a doctor gave me a pain med with codeine in it. Took away the pain but I was worthless the rest of the day. Then referred to a doctor who suffered from migraines himself. He started me on Imitrex. The first time I got injected went from pain and nausea to smiling 20 minutes later. That was around 1996 or so. I’ve been on injectable Imitrex since, now the generic Sumatriptan. After retiring I thought my headaches would lessen, but they haven’t. I find more and more triggers affect me now, perfume seems to be the worst. A trip to the grocery usually ends up crossing some persons path who is loaded with perfume or cologne, and I can almost guarantee a migraine that night. As far as side effects over the years, I did have my left shoulder lock up a few years ago. That’s the arm I always inject since I’m right handed. A shot of cortisone and some exercise fixed that. Can’t really attest to any other side effects I’ve had as much as I have lost some abilities, but I’d put those to aging. All I can say is without the injections my life would be days of pain and missing lots of family time.

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  • By BJLuttrell

    Well apparently I have a great deal to learn. I am 53 and experiencing my first migraine attack / diagnosis. I had a stroke about 6 months ago and apparently this is one of the lovely permanent conditions I obtained from that. I feel so far behind, as so many in this age group have a history of having had migraine for decades and yet I am brand new to it. Hoping to learn from this site and others the best ways to manage. My first attack was a 3-day ordeal brought on by bright lights, an eye doctor visit with all the testing lights combined with brand new bright lights at work as near as we can figure. I had aura, nausea, and pounding in the left side of my head that was a little alarming until this diagnosis put it all together. Now is have a precription for Imitrex and zofran which I’m supposed to keep with me and take upon the first sign of a reoccurence. Will be allowed to return to work in a few days, and dreading the lights. Anyway, it is helping to read everyone’s comments.

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  • By Nancy Harris Bonk Moderator

    Hi BJLuttrell,

    Welcome to the Migraine.com discussion forum! I’m so sorry to hear about your recent diagnosis. It does sound like you have a good plan in place to manage a migraine attack.

    Please let me know if I can help in any way!

    Nancy

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  • By Nancy Harris Bonk Moderator

    Hi BJLuttrell,

    Welcome to the Migraine.com discussion forum! I’m so sorry to hear about your recent diagnosis. It does sound like you have a good plan in place to manage a migraine attack.

    Please let me know if I can help in any way!

    Nancy

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  • By Casper6

    Hi BjLuttrell
    Welcome to the discussion forum. You will find this is a great way to find out information and ask questions.
    Imitrex is in the Triptian medications. They have been a life saver for me. One of my triggers is light as well. Flashing lights, overcast cloudy days are awful for me, and then their is a florescent lighting. I wear a baseball hat a lot to keep the light glare off my eyes. However when I am teaching, I can’t wear them when students are around. So if I can I try to not have all the lights on. That helps sometimes… What I need is a wide headband with a visor on it, then maybe I could wear that. If your work allows it, a hat with any kind of brim would work. I hope you get some relief with Imitex. Take care.

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  • By IGM2O4M

    I just signed up today, I’ve had a migraine for a week and it’s been helpful to read other people’s comments. I’ve had migraines for over 40 years and have tried everything (surgery, medications, herbals, healthy lifestyle approaches, reducing exposure to scents, etc). I still get migraines but I think in general they aren’t as severe. Except for the migraines associated with food triggers which are the worst – but I do what I can. I think there are rules on this forum about limiting discussion about specific meds, but I would like to try the new CGRP injectable drug (Aimovig) and wonder about other people’s experiences.

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  • By Nancy Harris Bonk Moderator

    Hi IGM2O4M,

    Welcome to the Migraine.com discussion forum!!

    Food triggers can be tough. One of the problems is our triggers can change over time. I didn’t have an issue with raw onions until a few years ago and then WHAM – especially if it’s an older one.

    Keeping a regular sleeping schedule, staying hydrated and not skipping meals is helpful.

    Here is a link with more information on Aimovig; https://migraine.com/?s=Aimovig. I’ve not tried it but know people who have, with mixed results. Keep us posted if you give it a try.

    We look forward to hearing more from you!
    Nancy

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  • By jems

    Hi All

    Posted a while back upthread – migraines have taken a turn for the worse, in desperation I’m trialling a 3 month stop of the low dose HRT. Thought that maybe the fluctuations of the sequi HRT were making the migs worse, however no improvement in severity/frequency. So there’s another thing that didn’t work, ugh!

    Low estrogen brought migs back with a vengence at early menopause at 44 – I’m now 56, naively thought hormones may have settled to a low, consistent level.

    Starting to research the blood pressure / migraine connection as definitely feel mine is heart related – Amlodipine for migraine prophylaxis.

    Looking for a pain relief gel to apply to the ghastly neck knots, only problem is I’m so hyper-responsive to *any* meds, eg. side effects of triptans are hideous, nearly as bad as mig.

    Wishing strength and light (but not too bright, eh) to All Out There – trying to make it through the dark days, migraine is a very lonely place to be.

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  • By Nancy Harris Bonk Moderator

    Hi jems,

    Good to hear from you again, but sorry to hear you are not feeling good.

    If I’ve said this before forgive me. There are over 100 medications and supplements PLUS devices that can be used to treat migraine disease. It seems most of us need a combination of these to manage our migraine attacks. For example, I take a combination of medications, use Cefaly, and medical cannabis to help manage my migraine attacks. This article (if you’ve not seen it) has information on migraine prevention; https://migraine.com/blog/migraine-preventives-start/.

    There was information presented in AZ at the American Headache Society conference this past week regarding menstrual migraine and hormones I will try to dig up.

    Fellow advocate, and friend The Migraine Diva aka Jamie Sanders uses Battle Balm for neck pain. Maybe something to look into.

    I’ll be back with more info,
    Nancy

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  • By jems

    Thanks Nancy for this information, much appreciated.

    Guess we just have to keep trying different meds etc – just so drained with the constant battle … just want to be normal?

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