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Diagnosis of Migraine & Headache Types

Classic migraines late in life

  • By ellie4

    Hi, I’m new here and have been having classic migraines for 3 – 4 years. They started when I was 73! I just wanted to respond to Butterball 1950 to let you know that I was diagnosed with occipital neuralgia, too. I also had the nerve block (did nothing) and had the facet joints at C2,3, 3,4, 45 injected with lidocaine and steroids. I’ve been dealing with recovery of this, going to physical therapy to stretch and strengthen my neck muscles, and taking Topamax. I took Gabapentin as my first therapy, then Elevil, then Topamax, then Verapamil, then Inderal, now back to Topamax and Atenolol. Along the way I developed chronic steroid-responding glaucoma. So far, my best result has been from PT and the facet joint injections. My neurologist sent me to a neurosurgeon, I had MRIs of my neck and brain and then the neurosurgeon sent me to a Pain Management doctor for the cervical injections. I am now finished with Topamax since I developed a sensitivity to it which caused vasculitis. After 12 days of tapering, last night was my first Topamax-free night, and I immediately developed an aura + headache upon awakening this morning. My doctor has suggested Procardia as my last ditch migraine prophylactic. Has anyone else tried this drug? Sorry this is so long, but thanks for “listening.”

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  • By Nancy Harris Bonk Moderator

    Hi ellie4,

    Thank you for your questions and welcome to our discussion forum! Don’t worry about lengthy posts, we’re here to help!

    First let me say I’m sorry you are having a difficult time. Nifedipine, brand name Procardia is a calcium channel blocker that can be used for treating migraine. We have information on calcium channel blockers here; https://migraine.com/migraine-treatment/calcium-channel-blockers-to-prevent-migraine-headaches/. Some people have good results with this medication.

    Have you had an opportunity to see a “true” migraine/headache expert? These doctors are different from neurologists in that they are board certified in headache medicine, which is different than being certified in neurology. Neurologists may be fine doctors but have a hard time being experts in one area because they treat so many different conditions such as multiple sclerosis, stroke, epilepsy, Parkinson’s and others. Migraine/headache experts are just that, experts who treat one condition all day, every day – migraine and headache disorders. When you get a chance take a look at this information on how these doctors are special and how to find one; http://migraine.com/blog/how-are-migraine-specialists-different/ and https://migraine.com/blog/really-find-headache-specialist/.

    I hope that helps!
    Nancy

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