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Migraine Associated Vertigo/ Cyclical Dizzness

  • By Lana

    I have been suffering from “dizzy spells” for around 10 years. It starts with waking up in the morning extremely dizzy with major photophobia and will slowly go away as the day goes on while still having head pain, but not too much dizziness as long as I do not make sudden movements. As the days go on the last day will be a full day of dizziness with vomiting. No matter what medicine I try nothing seems to work or even make the dizziness or head pain duller. Something odd about this is that it happens in cycles. I get it about every 11 weeks and it lasts 3-6 days. Doctors have never used the term “cyclical dizziness” I was usually diagnosed with just migraine associated vertigo. But I recently found information about cyclical dizziness or headaches, which is exactly what I have. Can anyone provide any insight on this topic or give me advice / treatment suggestions? I have tried many.

    Please let me know.

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  • By Nancy Harris Bonk Moderator

    Hi Lana,

    Thanks for your question Lana. We can’t give medical advice, but can give you information you may want to share with your doctor. How does that sound?

    There is a type of migraine called vestibular migraine that has similar symptoms you’ve described. The dizziness associated with this can be very debilitating. Here is information on this type of migraine; https://migraine.com/migraine-types/vestibular-migraine/. With cyclical vomiting there typically isn’t head pain, but that doesn’t mean it can’t happen. This article has more on this disorder; https://migraine.com/migraine-types/abdominal-migraine/.

    It can take a long time to get an accurate diagnosis after years of seeing multiple doctors and frustration. Many people see neurologist after neurologist without good results. But did you know there are doctors who are board certified in headache medicine which is different than being certified in neurology? Neurologists may be fine doctors but have a hard time being experts in one area because they treat so many different conditions such as multiple sclerosis, stroke, epilepsy, Parkinson’s’ and others. Take a look at this information on how these doctors are special and how to find one; https://migraine.com/blog/how-are-migraine-specialists-different/ and https://migraine.com/blog/looking-for-a-migraine-specialist/.

    The next time you see your doctor (or a new one!) ask for your diagnosis – we are all entitled to know what it is!

    Nancy

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