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Complementary Alternatives Therapies

Neurofeedback

  • By Schindeler

    I am using Neurofeedback for migraines and other types of headaches and it is extremely effective. I was surprised that I couldn’t find any blogs about neurofeedback anywhere on this forum. I would love to help anyone I can with getting you this information and any research that you might like. I have so much success with this modality that I give my clients a money back guarantee if it doesn’t help them acquire significant changes. I haven’t had to give any money back yet but as we all know nothing is 100% effective. Please, if you are in pain and can’t find relief try neurofeedback. I will help you find someone in your area and I am happy to answer any questions about neurofeedback if you send me questions.
    Curtis Schindeler

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  • By Nancy Harris Bonk Moderator

    Hi chwpmm,

    Thank you for sharing your success with us. I’ve tried many, many complementary therapies including neurofeedback and biofeedback, without success.
    I will however pass this information along to our team and see what we can do to fill this gap.

    Nancy

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  • By Schindeler

    Hello Nancy,
    Thank you for your reply. How many sessions did you do and was the clinician not able to change the protocol since it wasn’t working for you? I don’t do biofeedback so I can’t speak to that. But, it’s very rare that Neurofeedback does not get some level of significant change. Are you still living with constant migraines? If so, come down to Sarasota and I will work with you for free and see if I can’t make a difference for you.
    Curtis Schindeler

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  • By Jerryw9

    Interesting. I am and old guy psychologist who was staff on a headache clinic in Indiana years ago (1974), using the original migraine biofeedback protocol from the Menninger Foundation. I got involved originally because I had a spouse with familial hemiplegic migraine and daughters with childhood migraine and eventually classic migraine. None of them became chronic, thank heavens.

    We found that the temperature biofeedback protocol worked pretty well for a specific group of patients – cold hands, low blood pressure, strong weather triggers and high stress responses. It took a long period of training and practice, as well as diet restrictions, detoxing the environment, special management of hormones and stress – but it was effective in reducing migraine frequency, often to several big ones a year. Then the triptans arrived and few patients wanted to invest the time and money in biofeedback when the pills or self-injection was so effective.

    I recently worked for the Army and did a lot of Neurofeedback with soldiers with what the Army called “migraine” but were typically post-concussion vascular headaches after being hit by a blast (IED). They also had memory & cognitive slowing. The symptoms looked very much like common migraine in triggers, onset, course and response to triptans and anticonvulsants (Topomax) but starting after deployment and usually involving the whole head. These responded very well to Neurofeedback aimed at quieting the brain bilaterally. I was hoping to find some fellow practitioners who can comment further or off-line. Now that I have retired, I want to follow up on this process with Veterans.

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    • By Schindeler

      Hi Wolverine,
      Biofeedback is a different modality geared towards biological functioning such as heart beat, body temp, etc through learning how making changes such as breathing differently alter these bodily functions.
      Neurofeedback, also called EEG Biofeedback, is based on brainwaves and feedback from those brainwaves being given back to the Organ (brain) in the form of fractal images and sounds. These images and sounds resonate with the specific firing of the brain at the time and with this information the brain can begin to self regulate using neuroplasticity. The easiest way to understand this is to understand that the brain sees itself in the mirror for the first time and with that reflection is able to make optimal changes. A more technical explanation is below from JerryW9.
      I don not use Biofeedback in my practice but it is know to be effective for various issues. I am currently working with 4 clients who all have had MAJOR migraines for as much as 60 years. ALL 4 of them are experiencing significant results ranging from no migraines in three weeks to much diminished pain levels of 8 or 9 down to 2 or 3. If you are not finding an answer with what you are currently doing please find someone in your area that is using NF for Migraines.

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  • By Jerryw9

    Back step— Biofeedback is the generic term for using instrumented monitors to train mind over body control of various physiologic systems. In general, training comes in two types – 1) general down regulation of stress related body responses to promote relaxation for stress response reduction. Lowering heart rate by watching a HR monitor, decreasing muscle activity while attached to an EMG machine, practicing relaxation with a GSR monitor, etc. 2) Specific training like controlling vascular constriction by feedback of skin temperature to decrease blood pressure, or abort a migraine. As awareness and skill develops, the monitoring feedback instruments are faded out.

    Neurofeedback is a specific approach to changing brain activity using EEG monitors to let the person know when the brain is doing the right thing. Much more complex. While Neurofeedback can be used for teaching relaxation, probably peripheral biofeedback is likely easier to learn. I often use directed relaxation or general biofeedback as a set up for Neurofeedback.

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  • By k_nelson

    I have also tried neurobiofeedback without any relief. I just have to say that everyone is different and I am happy for the people who it does work for.

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  • By Schindeler

    Hello Keziah……………I hope you are doing better these days.
    I had a discussion with a client yesterday about neurofeedback and the difficulty of getting more migraine sufferers in to try NF. She is a long time sufferer and is amazed (as are her friends) that she hasn’t had a migraine since after her first session with me 4 weeks ago. She even drank alcohol a couple nights ago to test a major trigger for her. Nothing. I have had remarkable success with every migraine client I have worked with to date. Adolescents to 72 years old. There are numerous protocols that can be used for a client depending upon the situation. I would beg you to make another attempt at it with a different therapist or better yet come see me. I will see you free of charge if that helps.

    Curtis

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  • By Terrence-

    Hi Curtis,

    You are a practitioner of this type of treatment?

    As support person/partner to a migrainuer, I have some questions.

    Thanks

    Terrence

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  • By Schindeler

    Terrence,
    Yes, I am a practitioner. I’d love to talk with you.

    84yrab,
    I see several practitioners in Maryland around Baltimore and further west. Let em know where you are and I’ll give you some names.

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  • By JRTC

    I am in the Tampa Bay Area and my Neurologist has recommended Neuro feedback for my migraines. I have 15+ per month even with Botox and migraine preventatives. I have tried every medication there is, acupuncture, meditation, migraine trigger diet, every thing. The issue with nuerofeed back is that I have Medicare and AARP supplement insurance and it won’t pay for it, and I cannot afford the high prices that everyone charges for it. There are two or three providers in Tampa and they want an outrageous amount for 20-30 sessions required.

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  • By LaSayleM

    Are there any practitioners in Southeast Arizona? I’m a mother and a disabled veteran, and I’ve had a constant, severe migraine for about a decade. PEMF, binaural beats brainwave entrainment, and a few other alternative medicine modalities have kept my skipping heart beating through the spikes, when conventional doctors gave up on me, but that’s about all they do… The last neurologist who saw me, ran down the laundry list of treatments, and when I told him I had tried everything he could think of, he asked me why I was there! I’d think the 3 layers of sunglasses I was wearing, and the huge ice pack in my hands, would make it fairly obvious that I was desperately trying to get some kind of relief, other than pain medication that just adds medication overuse to the party. Even a small improvement in my quality of life would be a major win, at this point.

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  • By JRTC

    Schlineler, where is your practice? Is it near Tampa. How many times a week does one need to do Neurofeedback to relieve migraines?

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    • By Schindeler

      I’m in Sarasota, I have a partner up in New Port Richey. We recommend 2x per week. I have some that fly in from out of state and do 2x per day for 10 days.

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    • By SArtz

      Hi,

      I have a long history of chronic migraines and am trying neurofeedback. I started June 26th, 2x a week with the exception of one week. Initially it seemed to help but recently I have been having daily migraines again (the last 5 days) and the timing of onset has changed. Does this seem normal? I don’t want to give up.
      Thanks for any info
      Sherry

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  • By amkeith

    My neurologist just suggested that I try neurofeedback. Has anyone had success getting their insurance to cover? The facility that he referred me to does not file, which places them out of network when I file on my own. Of course benefits are reduced.

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  • By DanielleP

    Are you familiar with BrainCore Therapy? I am thinking of looking into this for my daughter who has chronic migraine and is not getting relief from anything.

    Thanks for any information!

    Danielle

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  • By Lr mom

    Hi, I started searching in this topic because I have many migraines and while I’m sure others have worse ones, I just want to have lots fewer. I have headaches all the time that aren’t migraines. I suppose I have at least two a week, but many times a lot more. I first heard of neural feedback a few weeks ago when I accidentally found the autism channel and “The brain broad” So I am wondering if there is any places in the Little Rock Arkansas area that does this. I had tried bio-feedback when I was a teenager and for the most part, just found it was an interesting thing to do to get out of school, but didn’t really find it helped much for the migraines. They are most often triggered by stress and bad smells. Also, I am blind, so I am wondering if this kind of therapy will work on blind people because the show I saw required a person to make a certain color blobs to get bigger and certain ones to get smaller. So I wondered if neurofeedback requires sight.

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  • By Jerryw9

    Jerryw9 here again…
    Migraine is sooo complex, as many of you have noted. No single approach will do the job. I think of things like checking “dirty electricity” in the environment, very careful HA diary to find all the triggers, including hand temperature (hormones are particularly important in women), relaxation training to quiet the body, neurofeedback to quiet the brain, and even environmental clearing if environmental sensitivity seems to be a trigger. Combined treatments are often required. For persons with already cold hands that get colder when HA onsets, the biofeedback temperature training is very important.

    In a multi-factorial disorder, you will need lots of detective work to find a multi-factorial program. Good luck.

    PS: I am in Northern Arizona.

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