Forums


Complementary Alternatives Therapies

Supplements

  • By nalatuong

    I recently came across a product advertisement on my Facebook feed. I am usually skeptical about these things, but I’ll research anything that could potentially have an effect on my migraines. Has anyone seen or tried Migravent? On their website the supplement list includes the usual Butterbur, magnesium, Vitamin B 12, and Co-Q10. But they are very expensive at almost $40/bottle. I am just wondering if this is a useful product or a scam on migraine sufferers who would try almost anything for relief.

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By Teri Robert

    nalatuong,

    Some people have reported good results with this product.

    That said, I prefer not to take the combination products, but to take supplements individually. When they’re combined, it’s impossible to tell which ingredient helps if the product does help, and I prefer not to take anything that’s not helping. It’s also important to talk with our doctors before we try anything, including “natural” products. Take a look at https://migraine.com/blog/natural-migraine-remedies/

    Teri

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By Anne

    I’m taking Feverfew, magnesium and B vitamin supplements – think they’re the same components that are in migravent. All of the above were recommended by the neurologist I’m seeing. I’m a chronic migrainer that has gone from 15 or more days a month down to 12. The migraines are definitely less painful – but, who knows if it is the Feverfew… I’m also doing yoga therapy, which I find really helpful. I never realized how quickly I get overstimulated – and for me, that always leads to a migraine.

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By Ellen Schnakenberg

    annequin-harkin – You hit on precisely why it is usually best to try one medication at a time instead of piling several things on top of each other. When there is a side effect, you can only guess what the cause is. When it works, you’re stuck using all the meds when it may be only a single med that is helpful. When you think you’re going to need polypharmacy, it is usually done one medication at a time… first individually, then slowly adding one to the next until you have what you need. This needs to be done under the supervision of a really good doctor though. Remember, you are the expert of you, and the one who has the most to lose, gets to choose.

    ~Ellen

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By emicrania

    I’d love to hear what supplements, if any, you currently take (or have taken) relating to your migraines. I realize we have various migraine diagnoses and also respond differently to medications, treatments and supplements; however, I’m curious as to which supplements may or may not have worked for you: dosages, etc.

    Also, I’m interested in trying butterbur (Petadolex), but am reluctant to try it in case the toxins aren’t extracted properly. Your thoughts?

    Thanks,
    Emily

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By Nancy Harris Bonk Moderator

    Hi Emily,

    Many people with migraine take and have success with magnesium, vitamin B6, and Co Enzyme Q10. Let me share a few links with you on these supplements; https://migraine.com/migraine-treatment/natural-remedies/ and https://migraine.com/blog/safety-of-dietary-supplements-herbs-for-migraine-prevention/.

    In my opinion I would stay away from Petadolex at this point due to the processing issues. Dr. Mauskop wrote information on that in this link; https://migraine.com/blog/boswellia-a-potential-herbal-remedy/.

    It’s important to speak with our doctor before starting any natural supplement. Even though we think of these as ‘natural’ they were mankind’s first drugs and act as drugs in our system.

    Happy Holidays,
    Nancy

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
    • By Ron

      Hi everyone, This is my very 1st post here, i just joined. Been suffering for 10 plus years and was hooked on Excedrin(OTC). I took Petadolex for a 3 months and it worked (I got off the excedrin- big time rebound issues) but I was taken off of it by my Doc (Nuerologist) for the toxicity reasons, he now has me trying CoQ10 200 mg twice a day and 10 mg once daily of Singular (allergy prescription)and so far it’s working pretty well for me. He also mentioned adding B2 if i don’t see 50 % improvement after 6 months of the others. I have imetrix for real bad ones but they’ve been fewer and far between lately.

      Reply Created with Sketch. reply
    • By Katie M. Golden Moderator

      Rdarr,
      So glad you found the site. I hope it’s helpful to you. It’s great to hear that these supplements are helping you. There are much better for your body in the long run. Rebound headaches can be awful, so I’m glad you’re finding that the new treatment plan is helping.

      There are a few other natural supplements that you can try such as Magnesium- but of course talk to your doctor before adding anything new to your regimen. This article is a great resource for other natural remedies:
      https://migraine.com/migraine-treatment/natural-remedies/

      Best Wishes,
      -Katie
      Migraine.com Moderator

      Reply Created with Sketch. reply
    • By ArtieDog

      Hi – I have never had Migraines, but I started to have the “aura” where I would get jagged lines and not be able to drive for half an hour because they would block my view. My trigger was lighting – in stores, friend’s home, even in my bathroom. I started with infrequent occurrences, like maybe once a year for 3 years. Then they started every few days. I tried the B vitamins supplement called NEW ROOTS B6 Synergystic 100 mg Advance Formula and it has been a month and no auras since I started!! I do take them every day. If you can’t find that brand, I am sure any good quality brand will be the same.

      Reply Created with Sketch. reply
    • By Nancy Harris Bonk Moderator

      Hi ArtieDog,

      Thank you for sharing your success story with us! We love hearing good news!

      I’ll keep my fingers crossed for continued success!

      Nancy

      take them every day. If you can’t find that brand, I am sure any good quality brand will be the same.

      Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By emicrania

    Hi Nancy,

    Thanks for the quick reply and links to informative articles. I’ve taken magnesium, Co Enzyme Q10 and B6 for several years now at the suggestion of my migraine specialist. I also took vitamin D after I was found to be very deficient a few years ago, but now I’m within normal range.

    The potential toxicity of butterbur always scared me off in the past. I certainly won’t take the chance with it now. I always consult with my doctors and pharmacist before adding in any OTC drug or supplement. I’m probably overly cautious in that regard!

    I love this site! I found it after downloading the great “Migraine Meter” app. Thanks again for your help. Happy holidays to you, too!

    Emily

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By vitamin_migraine

    I’m surprised with the B6. I’ve recently added a vitamin B complex since stopping topiramate, but that’s because of the weight loss and fatigue.

    Therapeutically for migraines B2 is where it’s at. 200mg 2x a day (total 400mg). I take magnesium 250mg but as that is not prescription I have been wondering if I should be increasing it. I also take prescription 500mg Calcium + 1000UI vitamin D to counteract steroid use. If you are a woman and take steroids semi-regularly or regularly, this is something to consider.

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By Anthony

    vitaminmigraine & emicrania, have you had much success with the B2 supplement? I tried 200mg for a week or two, but didn’t notice much difference and didn’t like that fact that my urine was radioactive yellow! I know the bright yellow urine is your body getting rid of the excess B2, but it still was unsettling. And that was only at 200mg. I’m interested in trying it again however at the 400mg dose. How long do you think it would take to see any results? And do you know if there are any long term side effects from taking this much B2? I read somewhere that it could damage your eyes.

    I have also tried natural calm magnesium at about 350-400mg per day for a month, but didn’t notice much other than a slight calming effect and looser stools.

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
    • By Maddy

      Try the R5P form of Riboflavin/B2. We uses Thorne Research they have a 36mg. The R5P form is FMN, which is a more active form, requires less ATP for your body to use it. Good results with that 2x per day at that dosage. Also taking P5P B6.

      Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By Nancy Harris Bonk Moderator

    Hi emicrania,

    Thank you for sharing with us. You are correct – it can take up to three months before we see a reduction in our migraine frequency and severity when we take new medications and/or supplements.

    It sounds like you are working with a good team, let us know how you progress, OK?

    Nancy

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By Linda

    For those who have problems with large doses of Magnesium… There is now a transdermal magnesium that you can buy and spray on; you can also get a lotion. From what I have found, calcium blocks the absorption of Magnesium in the body and many of us have a lot more calcium than we need in our system already. With the Transdermal Lotion or Spray, it can be absorbed better. I’m trying it now and with all the other supplements I’m taking, it is one less thing to have to swallow!

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By Voluntaryist

    Hi all!
    I’ve taken feverfew in the past, but it didn’t really work for me.
    I’m now taking magnesium citrate, 200mg daily. It is definitely helping, reducing the intensity of my migraines. And I also take a ginger supplement whenever I feel I’m about to have a migraine attack. Sometimes it “kills” the migraine straight away. If the migraine is severe I might need to take another dose a couple of hours later.

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By Nancy Harris Bonk Moderator

    Voluntaryist,

    Thank you so much for sharing the information about magnesium. Ginger has also shown to be helpful with stomach upset and other symptoms in migraine. I’d like to share that information with you; https://migraine.com/blog/how-can-i-keep-my-migraine-medicines-down-so-they-will-work/ and https://migraine.com/migraine-treatment/natural-remedies/ginger-for-migraine-headaches/.

    Keep us posted on how you are doing!

    Nancy

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By Ellen.S

    I have been taking many of the above supplements for many, years. Since I am allergic to B12 (get very nauseous/dizzy.) I switched to B6 alone, while taking other minerals separate from vitamins like Vit. E and beta -carotene. I also grew my own fewer few, but it did not change anything for me. Also Butterbur was tried. Since I have a large interest in Herbs and used to garden, I did my research. You have to be careful of these two herbs because they are members of the Ragweed family. If you have any allergies like Hay Fever, be aware.

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By sgirl

    I too just started taking magnesium 250mg 2x day, b12 400mg, and butterbur 150mg day. I have been told to make sure you do not take calcium at the same time as the magnesium in case some of you have purchased it combined. I also heard something about niacin, but haven’t researched it yet. I am hoping anything works, my headaches are very frequent during the month and now I have weird daily headaches when I don’t have full blown ones. I just can’t seem to shake the hazy feeling. Does anyone else experience this?

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By KelcieLe

    You really should not take medication unless your doctor prescribes you. I have been taking medicines for my headaches from Texan Urgent Care in San Antonio. You may take medicines but only after some professional prescribes you.

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By sgirl

    My doctor has prescribed all the ones I listed above. I was just curious if they have actually worked for anyone. Like most of you at this point I am willing to try anything. I have a neurologist that prescribes this:
    melatonin 3 mg at night
    butterbur 50-100 2x day
    b2 50-100 day
    magnesium 500 – 1000 day.

    I just got started on it, hoping for the best.

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By Pampers

    Hello all. My first post here. I have an 11 boy that has migraines (over right eye) where he throws up and after being sick his stomach hurts so bad he cries. He is on medication current from his neurologist – we are looking at Truliv.

    Anyone heard of Truliv? Suggestions? Thank you!

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By Oliver Reed

    My girlfriend has been getting migraines since she was a little girl. She gets anywhere from 1-3 migraines a month and usually they are pretty severe. I asked her why she doesn’t take anything to help with the pain and she replied, “b/c I don’t trust pharmaceutical companies and how do we know what it is that we are actually putting in our bodies.” To which I replied, “Okay, fair enough. I can understand your position.”

    So, I did some research on all natural/organic herbs and whatnot that could be used to help with migraines. After researching the topic I found many of the same vitamins, herbs, and minerals that others have posted on this page. Including feverfew, butterbur, magnesium, Riboflavin, Coenzyme Q10, etc. I found good explanation of why these help at http://www.allnaturalmigrainecompany.com/

    So, for about a month now she has been taking these supplements and she has said that her migraines have been less severe than ever before. According to research, it can take up to three months of taking these ingredients for them to work at their full effect. After one month, she has seen results. I will keep everyone updated with her results!

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
    • By Katie M. Golden Moderator

      @christi,
      Ginger has been shown to help Migraines. I’ve never tried to take it in a supplement form, but try to add it to dishes I make.

      I rarely direct people to WedMD, but they had the most comprehensive info on ginger supplements. Looks like 5mg a day is the max. Talk to your doctor. You may want to start on a lower dose and titrate up assuming you can tolerate the side effects. I’ve also included some basic info on ginger from Migraine.com

      https://migraine.com/migraine-treatment/natural-remedies/ginger-for-migraine-headaches/
      http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-and-supplements/ginger-uses-and-risks

      I hope this helps you!
      -Katie
      Migraine.com Moderator

      Reply Created with Sketch. reply
    • By Voluntaryist

      Hi Christi,

      I took ginger supplements for some time and it did help. However, ginger will only work if you take it at the very moment you feel a migraine is coming.

      I tried different brands and doses, the one that worked best for me is Solgar – Ginger Root Extract (Standardized – Full potency). Regarding the dose, you will have to try and see what works for you.

      Also, please be mindful when taking ginger. It is said that ginger can help with acid reflux and gastritis but in my case it only made it worse (you have to take large doses of ginger to stop a migraine and if you take it very often it could be bad for your stomach).

      Hope that helps!

      Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By Rob D

    Hi my wife has been suffering from migraines as long as i have known her. She always jokes with me telling me she was fine until she met me and then the migraines started and I tell her I was thin and had hair until I met her, hehe. All joking aside I feel so bad for her when she gets a migraine, I just cant imagine the pain. So we both agreed to not put her on prescription drugs. After a lot of research and trial and error with different herbal supplements, we have found one that seems to suit her quite well for the past four months. It contains many of the plant extracts listed above and a new class of magnesium called magnesium threonate that seems to pass through the blood brain barrier quicker. The name of the supplement is called MigrAway from Elixir Naturals hope it helps. Take care.

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By susanl

    Just wondering if anyone else has had any experiences with increasing the amount of tryptophan in their diet/taking spirulina as a supplement?

    I stumbled upon the idea of adding tryptophan into my diet when I conclusively realised that I am usually quite depressed when I have periods of many migraines. So I looked into this, and read some studies that suggest that, indeed, migraine is often correlated with low levels of seratonin in the brain. I started looking into natural seratonin boosters (in addition to exercise), and came across tryptophan which is found in a variety of foods, inc. seeds, turkey and spirulina.

    L-tryptophan supplements also exist, however I was wary of them, as especially with sumatriptan (which I take), they can lead to excessive seratonin synthesis, and sometimes seratonin syndrome. So, I decided to start adding about 10 grams of spirulina (which is super tryptophan dense) to my diet daily. Not sure if it by itself is doing anything, as I simultaneously made a lot of dietary changes, which probably have collectively helped decrease the amount of migraines I get, but the frequency of my migraines has decreased substantially.

    Has anyone looked into this/had any experiences?

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By annie67

    Anyone tried 5htp? If useful what dosage did you get a result? Have you had to use Triptans too? I have been taking 100mg with food at 9PM and found that it has reduced intensity and frequency. But have also had to supplement with a quarter of a zomig most mornings as I get a migraine ‘shadow’. Pain goes within 30mins. Thinking of increasing 5htpdose to 100mg 3x a day to see if it reduces need for Tristan. Interested in anyone else experimenting in this way.

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
    • By Nancy Harris Bonk Moderator

      Hi annie67,

      Thank you for your question and being part of the Migraine.com discussion forum.

      I’ve not used 5-HTP but did find information in this article; http://www.achenet.org/resources/serotonin_and_headache/. Dietary supplements do interact with other medications we take so it’s important to speak with our doctor before taking them.

      Triptans are medications that abort or stop the migraine process and are meant to be taken at the first sign of a migraine attack, no more than two to three days a week. Taking migraine medications (Zomig) and/or pain relievers, whether they are over-the-counter or prescription, more than two to three days a week can create another headache disorder called medication overuse headache or moh which was formerly called rebound. The thing about moh is we will have endless daily pain that is hard to break and our migraine attacks will be more difficult to treat. Here is information on moh; https://migraine.com/blog/help-how-can-i-not-overuse-migraine-medications/.

      Let me know how you make out,
      Nancy

      Reply Created with Sketch. reply
    • By annie67

      Hi, thanksfor info. I am aware of Moh and have discussed with my GP. Will report back on my new regime when more info.
      Thanks
      Annie

      Reply Created with Sketch. reply
    • By Voluntaryist

      Hi Annie,

      I took 5HTP many years ago, only for a few weeks. I had to stop taking the supplements because of the side effects (anxiety, vivid dreams – nightmares, and headaches).

      A couple of years ago, I wanted to give it a second chance, maybe try a different dose. I was taking triptans at the time, and did some research. I discovered that triptans and 5HTP don’t go together, there are possible interactions including serotonin syndrome.

      At the moment, I am taking magnesium supplements on daily basis and Zolmitriptan whenever I have a migraine. With magnesium, the intensity and frequency of migraines has been reduced significantly.

      Please be careful if you are taking both 5HTP and triptans! Here you can find some info about interactions and side effects
      http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/5hydroxytryptophan-5htp

      Hope that helps!

      Cecilia

      Reply Created with Sketch. reply
    • By annie67

      Hi, I need to take 5htp with food otherwise weird dreams as you have noted. I understand that Triptans are serotonin agonists and 5 htp provides serotonin. So am aware that dosage must be carefully controlled.
      Thanks for info
      Annie

      Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By antonella

    Hello to all. I’m an italian women. I entered by chance in this forum. I want to give my little contribution to give a chance to everyone to solve problems of migraine. I have a migraine experience with addition of trigeminal neuralgia after a few years. I started when I was 17 years with severe pain in the right temple. I have made many visits to neurologists, RMN… Luckily it was only headache, but the pain does not pass even with the strongest drugs (antidepressants-Imigran..). Then came the trigeminal neuralgia, and then the pain became suicidal and all this lasted for nearly 17 years. Then a naturopath has advised me to take an herbal product called Biocephal. You will understand my delight! I was disappointed but desperate and finally tried. It has taken 3-4 months but slowly all the pain are disappeared altogether and now I have to say thank goodness that I have taken this herbal product. They are by now 7 years I have not the most pain in the head. Biocephal has changed my life. I take it still and I don’t stop to take it longer !!

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By emicrania

    My error in stating B6 when it’s actually B2 (400 mg day in divided dose) that I take. For some odd reason, I confuse the two when typing. Excuse the error!

    I take daily calcium (Caltrate), supplemental vitamin D3, B2, B complex, CoQ10 in the form of ubiquinol, and magnesium citrate (taken in a dissolvable powder form called Natural Calm).

    The ubiquinol form of CoQ10 is rather new (prior bottle was “simple” CoQ10), and I’ve heard this form is more efficient.

    I’ve been taking Natural Calm magnesium citrate (as opposed to my prior magnesium oxide) since reading some posts from Ellen, doing further research, and consulting again with my migraine specialist. I’m really enjoying its calming effects, especially the sound night’s sleep it provides me. I truly hope that with this more bioavailable form of magnesium I will see some improvement in my migraine frequency and severity with continued daily use.

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply
  • By emicrania

    Hi awest,

    I’ve taken all the supplements listed above for a couple years, but just added the Natural Calm about a month ago. I make sure to take B-complex with my 400 mg daily of B2 (taken as 200 mg lunch and 200 mg dinner). My urine is bright yellow, even drinking lots of water, but it doesn’t bother me. I haven’t noticed any improvement yet, but continue to work closely with my neurologist and PCP and they still suggest I stay on them. I see my migraine specialist quarterly and have a complete physical exam once a year. My blood work is also checked regularly. I haven’t heard anything about B2 damaging the eyes, but be sure to ask your neurologist.

    I believe a few months is much too early to tell if your supplements are helping. However, I’ve enjoyed Natural Calm almost from the start. I’m sure you are doing so already, but be sure to run all supplements and dosages past your migraine specialist. Wishing you many migraine-free days!

    Reply Created with Sketch. reply