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50 Years & Older Living With Migraine

Types of Migraine That You Never Heard of

  • By migraineicerelief

    There are some kinds of migraines which happen in an exceptional case. There are some points following below:
    1. A retinal Migraine
    2. A hemiplegic Migraine
    3. A Menstrual Migraine
    4. An Abdominal Migraine
    5. A Vestibular Migraine

    So these are the types of migraines.

    Edited by moderator

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  • By agnesjoan

    I have had classic migraines since the age of 6 I’m now almost 60. My daughter was diagnosed with abdominal migraines in her early teens. I had no idea the was such a thing.

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    • By Stancornett

      Is the abdominal migraine as the classic migraine with vomiting and severe headache with aura because this was the type headaches I had from early child hood until I was 37 then had no headache of any kind for almost 3 years and the summer before my 40 the birthday the doctors thought I had an inflimation of my optic nerve and called it optic neuritus but the migraines continued for three years then went away for about 6 months then came back with a fury a month after my 44th birthday and marriage and have not subsided. My meds keep them somewhat abated. I found out a few years ago what the ER doctor call optic neuritis was actually a migrainous stroke which affected the optic nerve of both eyes and damage my peripheral vision as well as my depths perception.

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  • By AZReynolds

    I have decided I needed to keep repeating myself so someday someone will see and include–syncope migraines! Yes, unusual and my doctor says rare, but they take migraine suffering to a whole new level. Another episode and I have to give up my car. So far they have only occurred early in the morning or late, late at night just before bed, but who knows when they will change again and start happening in the middle of the day. Anyone else have fainting as their aura? No fun.

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    • By Nancy Harris Bonk Moderator

      Hi AZReynolds,

      Wow! That must be unbelievably frustrating. At this point, I don’t question too many symptoms – it seems anything is possible with migraine disease!

      I am sorry you are going through this. Do you have any warning signs before an episode is on the way. I may be comparing apples and oranges, but my dad experienced syncope which usually occurred when he was dehydrated, overly hungry and/or tired. Just my two cents worth.

      Keep us posted on how you are doing,
      Nancy

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    • By AZReynolds

      That’s a good way to put it…. undiscovered country! I also deal with dysmetropsia, but always had it so mildly I never mentioned it to anyone. Things just looked “little” to me from time to time. But during my last migraine, it went full blown and my arms grew and the bed got tall. Freaky as all get out. Luckily my neurologist had already diagnosed me and I had read up on it so I was prepared. It only lasted about 30 minutes so I just sat back and enjoyed the weirdness of it all. If you’ve never heard of it, look it up. I used to think these people were nuts, but now I believe them! They think Lewis Carroll had it and he suffered from migraines too. Also known as AIWS or Todd’s syndrome.

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    • By SPupp

      I know what you mean by sitting back and enjoying the weirdness of it all! My first migraine was a classic migraine with a textbook “fortification spectrum.” Additionally, I had blind spots that took the “X” out of an exit sign. I knew it was there, but couldn’t see it unless I moved my head – but then another letter would disappear.

      I just sat back and enjoyed the show. It was more enjoyable than the lecture I was attending…until the headache and nausea hit, that is!

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  • By Stancornett

    Does anyone have times before headache comes on where the light is dim almost like twilight or like when you come inside from the bright sun into a dim room.

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