Waking up with migraine when you thought you’d be home free

The alarm goes off and I snooze it just one last time (you already know I have a lifelong problem with this).  Nine minutes later, it goes off again, and I snooze it again—seriously, this time is the last time.  Really. I promise.

It’s now 7:45 in the morning and it really is time for me to get up.  I try hard to keep my sleep routines fairly consistent.  My eyes open for good and I look out the bedroom window to see that it’s a partly cloudy day.  The weather app on my phone says it’ll be in the sixties. Not too shabby, Georgia, not too shabby.

And get this: I don’t think I have a migraine today. After waking up the past few mornings feeling pretty crappy, it’s awesome to feel okay.
At least I think I feel okay.

I swing my feet off the bed and sit up only to be hit yet again by the monster. The migraine is back, and all I needed to do to rouse the beast was move around the tiniest bit.

This is one of my saddest and most disheartening kinds of moments as a migraine sufferer: the moment when I realize that, yet again, migraine is going to impact my day.

Do you ever have these days, days when—if even for a moment—you think you’re going to feel good only to realize that the migraine is back to get you again?  Days when the migraine seemed to be lying in wait to attack right when you thought you were in the clear? (Sometimes it takes me a bit to figure out if the migraine is really here or not—but that’s another article all together.)

It’s hard for me to accurately and adequately express the profound sense of disappointment, sadness, frustration, and even anger that hits me when I realize I’m not going to have a healthy day.  It’s supremely upsetting to realize for the millionth time that I am not a so-called “regular” person, that I am not going to be able to go about my day with any real expectation that I’ll get even half my tasks done.

This is the sort of thing that can be hard to explain to people who don’t have migraine or don’t have another chronic illness.  It’s not always the pain and discomfort of an attack that hurt the most—it’s the fact that, with little warning, you are suddenly being whisked out of your own life again, and there’s no real estimate of when you’ll come back. Sure, if you’re lucky you have medications that work.  But even after taking them it can be awhile before you feel like you’re returning to your “real” self.  And people with chronic migraine sometimes have no break at all and are no longer sure who they are without migraine.

It is, in a word, a series of heartbreaks to live with migraine disease, to wake up day after day and not know if you will be able to live your life or if the whole thing will have to be put on hold.  If you will be of sound mind and body or if you will be some shadow of yourself.

How many of you can identify with what I am expressing here? How many of you woke up one day this week only to realize you were having yet another migraine day?

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

View Comments (58)
  • Denise
    3 years ago

    I am so grateful to be able to have the opportunity to find migraine.com, simply to be able to read these stories and be able to understand what the author is living with. I have no one or have known anyone that has or is going through the same disease. It helps me to read these stories to know that I am not crazy, that having pain almost all the time is a real thing. Thank you.

  • pligthart
    3 years ago

    This could have been my story as well but about 6 months ago I found out I was gluten and lactose intolerant. After I went on a special diet without these food groups I noticed that all the migraines that appear in the night are gone. I have plenty of migraines left that come up during the day but not a single one anymore during the night

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    Petra,

    Oh, I am overjoyed that you discovered this about your health. Stories like yours keep me going on days when I am feeling kind of down about this illness and the impact it has on people’s lives. I’m sorry the dietary changes didn’t knock out all your migraines, but at least you’ve seen a vast improvement. Well done!

    How did you discover your gluten and lactose intolerance, if you don’t mind my asking?

    -Janet G.

  • Deb79
    4 years ago

    This is my sad story also. If I’ve had a bad migraine the day before and it’s gone by bedtime, I think I’m home free and tomorrow could be hit and miss. Then in the middle of the night I’m jolted awake from a dream with a whopping migraine, which is not a positive sign and sets the tone for the day ahead. Sometimes Relpax works, other times I’m not so lucky.

    This is so upsetting, especially when you have plans or to meet a friend whom you’ve cancelled dates before because of migraines. I also have those ones where I wake up in the morning, move my body the wrong way an bam! migraine.

    I’ve got chronic migraines and have graduated from one or two really severe migraines per week to almost everyday. You just have to learn to live with pain, where bright lights, noise and certain smells (cigarettes, perfume, gas fumes) add further torture. You know it’s bad when air from a window is painful.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    deb79,

    It’s a little after 8:00 am on a Sunday and I had this experience again. Went to bed last night feeling hopeful about all the things I’d get done on Sunday, and instead I woke up heavy-headed and in migraine discomfort and pain around 6:30 am. This week my meds haven’t worked for me (scary in itself), so I’m hesitant to use my last allowed dose this week on this migraine since it’s Sunday. Oh, these annoying struggles!

    I hope you’re feeling okay today. Are you seeing a migraine or headache specialist, and/or have you talked to your healthcare providers about how your migraine patterns have changed? It’s always important to talk to your doctor(s) when your migraine patterns change, especially if their impact on your life is getting more severe.

    Best of luck to you; thanks for being a part of this community and this conversation.

    Take care,
    Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • bee_at_peace
    4 years ago

    This is truly amazing, I thought I was the only one because everyone – not experiencing Migraines think that I’m crazy and I tell them. “I have a Headache /Migraine almost everyday. I have just learned to deal with them.
    Thank you for sharing!

    Some if not all the stories I can relate to.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    Thanks so much for this comment!

  • blackninepatch
    4 years ago

    Boy, did you nail it! I face EXACTLY the same problem and feel the same way. Most days I’m wakened from a dream at 3:00 or 4:00 in the morning with a severe headache and nausea, but on those few mornings when I actually make it through the night, I dread stirring, even to turn off the alarm. For this reason, I keep my alarm under my pillow so I barely have to move. It’s a miserable fact of life that my first thought of the day is often, “If I move, will I feel a migraine?” If the answer is yes, then I next have to decide, “If I take my medication now, will I be well enough to make it through a day at work?” I grow anxious when I have to text in sick. I teach, so calling in sick means finding a substitute and creating lesson plans off the cuff for that day. It also means that my boss is usually unwilling to pay for a substitute, so she coerces my colleagues into each taking a class period throughout the day. When I get back to work, I feel horrible that I’ve inconvenienced everyone. They’ve had to give up a planning period to cover for me. And as the year progresses, my boss is less sympathetic. I’d rather go in with a headache and have my students do “silent work” than risk the dour looks I get when I return after a sick day.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    21nldx6,

    Oh, my heart was pained to read your comments. I can’t imagine having to deal with this dilemma you face on so many working days (or mornings leading up to working days). Does your place of employment have a clear sick day policy? As a former educator, I know how hard it is for schools to find funding for substitutes, but I still hate that the onus is put on your co-workers.

    Above all else, you just sound so stressed, which makes me sad. Have you tried to incorporate any stress-reduction techniques into your life, from walking gently a few times a week to gentle yoga to mindfulness-based stress reduction?

    Take care, and let us know how you’re doing.

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • bee_at_peace
    4 years ago

    This is truly amazing, I thought I was the only one because everyone – not experiencing Migraines think that I’m crazy and I tell them. “I have a Headache /Migraine almost everyday. I have just learned to deal with them.
    Thank you for sharing!

    Some if not all the stories I can relate to.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    v4qyns,

    Thanks for sharing your comments. It really is amazing to read stories within this community and realize how, despite feeling like you were alone, there really are others experiencing things like you. I suppose it’s equally amazing to see just how many people don’t have migraines that manifest in the same way yours do at all. This is a fascinating illness, and we all learn so much from each other. Thanks for commenting, and I hope you’re feeling okay today.

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • carped
    4 years ago

    Thank you for the accurate description of what it feels like to wake up in the morning with a chronic illness. Realizing my day is going to be a struggle can be so depressing and frustrating – right out of the gate. I appreciate your article. It makes me feel less alone.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    If there’s one positive side to this frustrating illness, it may be that we can find a sense of camaraderie by sharing our experiences. Thank you for your thoughtful comments. I hope you’re feeling okay today.

    Take care,
    Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • Carol
    4 years ago

    I wake up with Migraines. I take Imitrex, the only thing that works. What I really want to know if anyone has these effects of Migraines. Yesterday, I woke up with a headache then migraine. I sweat so much and had the chills and hot and sweating profusely. When I finally got out of bed, everything was drenched. I weighed myself and I lost 4 lbs. of sweat. Obviously, I felt extremely weak. I get these episodes not every time I have a migraine. Does anyone have or had this with their migraines. I really appreciate some help. Thank You Carol

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    f4m7yc,

    I have had the sensation of feeling feverish during a migraine (even when my temperature was “normal”). I think you may find it easiest to ask your question in one of our migraine.com forums, where there are lots of people seeking answers about medications, side effects, migraine symptoms, and more. Here’s our forum dedicated to conversations about symptoms–try searching there for your symptoms and/or posting a new thread. Best of luck to you.

    http://migraine.com/forum/migraine-and-headache-symptoms/

    Take care; I hope you’re feeling okay today.

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • Meldome
    4 years ago

    Hello

    I have had headaches for most of my life due to multiple concussions.In my mid 30’s,I had my first migraine. At first I would get a migraine maybe 2 or 3 times a year. Each year since 1995, that number would increase. By 2011 I was getting at least 20 a month and I would get them for 4 to 6 days straight. Recently I had to take two Rizatriptan pills a day for 4 straight days. My fear is that this will be the new standard of migraines I will have. I don’t get the aura very often but I always seem to wake up with them or they will hit me shortly after I wake up. It’s a hell of a way to start your day. I’ve been accused of being a bit negative at times but really, after 20 years of this, who can blame me. It’s beginning to ruin my life. The meds help but I always feel lethargic when I take them and I feel as though some of my emotions have vanished from me. Has anyone else had weird long term side effects from using Rizatriptan.

  • Meldome
    3 years ago

    Thanks Janet. I will look into it. The big problem for me is that there doesn’t seem to be any specialist in my neck of the woods( South Shore of Nova Scotia). I will look over the articles you recommended. The Meds are a big help of course. I can’t imagine what life would be like without them. It’s also a great relief that they came out with a generic brand that is about a third of the cost of the Non-generic brand at the same time my Migraines began to increase. That has been a big relief to my wallet. I hope all is well. Take care.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    Meldome,

    I’m so sorry to hear you’re having such a rough time. Since you have prescriptions I know you are under a doctor’s care, but have you looked into hiring a migraine or headache specialist, someone who has expertise in migraine and the way it impacts patients’ quality of life.

    Here are a couple of articles that may help.

    https://migraine.com/blog/making-decision-see-headache-specialist/
    https://migraine.com/blog/healthcare-providers-turn-to-for-help/

    I’m so sorry to hear about your situation and want to encourage you to not give up hope and to remember that there can be comfort and camaraderie here among your fellow migraineurs.

    Take care; I hope you’re feeling as well as possible today.

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • Jen T
    4 years ago

    I can relate to this very much. As someone who has had migraines for over 20 years, I’ve felt these same feelings of disappointment and frustration. My migraines will usually last for 2 1/2 days. It’s that sinking feeling you get when you wake up on day 3, and the headache is still lingering.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    I hear you, Jen T. Thank you for your thoughtful feedback. I hope you’re feeling well today.

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • Nananina
    4 years ago

    Saturday 6:00am and I wake up with a migraine. I was hoping to sleep a bit more. It’s my free day!! This happens so often, I am exhausted.
    I’ve experienced migraines for 28 years. They usually start in the morning.
    I feel for you. The last paragraph on your article expresses the daily fear and frustration we migraine sufferers go through.
    Be strong!

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    Nananina,

    Thank you for your kind words and encouragement. I hope you are feeling well today.

    Based on your description of getting attacks on Saturdays and other free days, I wonder if you might be experiencing “let-down migraines.” You can read more here:https://migraine.com/blog/let-down-migraines/

    It’s frustrating to think that once you can put your feet up and relax, your brain decides it’s time for a migraine episode.

    Take care,
    Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • solove0611
    4 years ago

    Thank you, Thank you so much. This article was one I desperately needed today. It’s my husband and I’s anniversary. Woke up this morning feeling great, did some house cleaning and got things done looking forward to a romantic kid free night with my husband. Guess what, this afternoon I had some lunch and was finishing cleaning the kitchen and **bam** my eyes started going “goofy” as I have started referring to it for lack of a better term. I won’t lie I cried. Not out of pain but because I knew it would not be a romantic evening that hubby and I could remember all of the good…and bad…times in our relationship. He is absolutely wonderful when it comes to being understanding. He picks up more than his fair share of the housework without being asked and makes sure I have whatever I need. As silly as this might sound that almost makes me sadder that I can’t spent the evening we had planned. Anyway sorry I’m whiny today but just knew you guys would understand. Back to my cave I go…

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    solove0611,

    I don’t consider your post to be whiny in the least–you are justifiably angry and frustrated that your illness has stolen what you were hoping to be a really wonderful day and evening with your husband. I’m so sorry. Feel free to vent and be truthful here–we are your comrades and want to help support you.

    I hope things are better now–I apologize for taking so many weeks to reply!

    Take care,
    Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • Joxie
    4 years ago

    This is my life as well. I go to bed feeling fine and wake up with a headache, my face throbbing, and my neck stiff and hurting. I tell people that I no longer make plans because I have no idea whether I will be okay or debilitated from one day to the next.
    I do have some good meds but they make me so tired that I cannot function.

    Migraines hurt physically and emotionally. I have stopped trying to explain them to others. It’s not worth the effort.

    I retired early in part due to migraines and how my bossed treated me when I had migraine days. Those of you who are trying to work while hiding your pain, my heart goes out to you.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    Thank you for these thoughtful words, Joxie. I hope you’re feeling okay today.

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • Alison
    4 years ago

    Yes, me too. Every single morning,without fail. It really helps to know that I am not alone. Also that I’m not the only one who gets sad and frustrated by this half-life.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    I’m sorry to hear you experience this same frustrating situation, Alison, but I do thank you for making the rest of us feel a little less alone. That’s one point of comfort in all this–we have a community of online friends who really seem to get it.

    You mention that your migraines are occurring every single morning–that worries me. Have you sought the help of a migraine or headache specialist yet? This article may be a good jumping-off point for you: https://migraine.com/blog/making-decision-see-headache-specialist/

    Take care,
    Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • Jennie
    4 years ago

    You have described every day of my life with hemiplegic migraine. Every day I wake up and wonder, will I be reliable today, will I be in pain or paralysed on a train journey today. Will I be able to speak, to see to stop vomiting. I am surprised I am not a lot less cheerful but after 31 years of attacks I have become used to my crazy life.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    Jennie,

    I, too, am surprised that, at least for much of the time, I stay relatively cheerful and positive despite the days and weeks this illness has seemingly stolen from me. I know the worry and anxiety you describe so well. I hope you’re feeling okay today, and thanks for sharing your thoughts.

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • nantzjs
    4 years ago

    I’m in the same boat. I have a daily chronic migraine with zero relief and its been like this for 17 yrs and I’m 33. No meds work and as soon as my eyes open the pain is there. Maybe one of these days they will figure something out for us all.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    nantzjs,

    Have you sought the assistance of a migraine or headache specialist? This type of caregiver isn’t necessarily a neurologist (just as all neurologists aren’t necessarily well-versed in the intricacies of migraine). This article might help: https://migraine.com/blog/making-decision-see-headache-specialist/

    I hope you are feeling okay today. It pained me to read your words. Do let us know how you’re doing. I apologize for taking so long to reply to you.

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • Windy
    4 years ago

    Yep. Know exactly how you feel. Before mine became chronic and refractory, the ones I awoke with were the very worst. And what made it even more maddening is I realized it happened the day after I would jump out of bed, happy, and full of energy. Once I made that connection, I spent that energetic day worrying about the price I was going to pay for it.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    I know what you mean–I’m always suspicious of euphoric moods and extra-productive days, because the next day I’m often wiped out. Boo!

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • solove0611
    4 years ago

    I definitely feel for you…hard to find a balance!!

  • bluebird
    4 years ago

    Each day is framed by uncertainty.
    I suppose it is like life in the jungle…never knowing when something will swoop out of the unseen and take a bite. Feeling defenseless and claiming acceptance is a challenge indeed.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    Beautiful metaphor, bluebird. Thank you for your comment.

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • seral
    4 years ago

    This is the worst migraine i get when i wake up with it.
    It can happen during the night or in the morning when i need to get up.
    Its like your soul has been taken away and replaced with the dark throbbing pain. i want it to go away so i can carry on living but this monster that visits me, sometimes unexpected is going to hang around for days.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    seral,

    Thank you for your comment. Do you frequently wake with migraine (either first thing in the morning or if it wakes you in ht middle of the night)? If so, it’s possible you may be able to alter some sleep habits to improve your quality of life. There’s a series of articles on sleep-related triggers here on the site–here’s the first one to get you started: https://migraine.com/blog/migraine-triggers-sleep-1/

    Take care; I hope you’re feeling good today.

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • rhoeffner
    4 years ago

    This used to be me every single day. EVERY DAY…until my doctor decided to try a beta blocker. Not sure if any of you have tried it or perhaps you are and it’s not working. I do not have high blood pressure, but I take 50 milligrams of Atenalol before going to bed every night and I can count on both hands the times I have gotten up with a migraine the next morning. It’s truly liberating and I’m so very thankful to the doctor who suggested that I try this line of attack. Going on 15 years of this working for me.

    If you are on a beta blocker and it’s not working, maybe you could ask to try a different one. I believe it has helped my overall migraine numbers as well. I used to have several a month and now, maybe 1 a month or maybe even 1 every 2 months!

    Truly, my life is so very different on beta blockers. I used to be plagued with slight depression at times, but that has disappeared as well. Few migraines = New Life!

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    I love hearing success stories like that! Encouraging comments like this mean so much, and I’m sorry it took so long to write you back. I have taken the same beta blocker as you in the past with mixed results (mostly positive), but due to other health concerns my doctor had me cease treatment. Again, I’m so happy to hear of the positive impact this type of medication has had on your quality of life.

    So sorry it took me a million years to write you back. 🙂

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • anaenlima
    4 years ago

    I’ve woken with a migraine so many times in the last thirty years I’ve lost count. Sometimes everyday for a long period. I always wondered how could I have slept through that, but reading your article has made me wonder if they only hit as I woke up. It’s always disheartening. Another day suffering through work or, if it is the weekend, another day sitting looking at nothing. At least for the last few months I’ve been on proper migraine medication that usually works although making me feel tired. For years I took everything I was prescribed and more knowing it probably wouldn’t work. What took my doctors so long?

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    Anaelima,

    First of all, I’m sorry it took me so long to reply to your comment. I am happy to hear that you are finally on a medication that seems to be working for you.

    Many thousands of migraineurs have sleep-related triggers, and I think it’d be well worth your time to look into the possibility that your migraines may be better controlled through changes to your sleep habits. Here’s the first in a series of articles on sleep–this series has helped lots of our readers figure out how to lessen the number of migraines they get upon waking.

    https://migraine.com/blog/migraine-triggers-sleep-1/

    If you search the site for “sleep” using the search box in the upper, right-hand corner, you’ll find even more articles that might help.

    In the meantime, I hope you’re feeling well today. Thanks for taking the time to be a part of this community.

    Sincerely,
    Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • Khadija
    4 years ago

    I hate when this happens! I feel that the migraine wins since being asleep I felt nothing brewing. Soon as I awake, right between the eyes and in the middle of my forehead I feel a drone of a pain and I know it is the migraine. When I first started getting migraines in high school most started as I was sleeping but only happens now from time to time. With the particular migraine that starts in my sleep I get the same pain that I put at pain level extreme as I get when I have a migraine with aura.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    Khadija,

    So sorry it took me over a month and a half to get back to you! I want to suggest that you read some articles on this site about sleep-related migraine triggers. You may find some insight, I hope!

    Here’s the first I ask people to start with–there are many more, just search “sleep” in the text box in the upper, right-hand corner of the Migraine.com page.

    https://migraine.com/blog/migraine-triggers-sleep-1/

    Take care; I hope you’re feeling okay today.

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • Sylvia T
    4 years ago

    It happened to me today …. Thank you for sharing, it helps!!

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    Thanks for the comment, Sylvia T!

  • blueangel1980
    4 years ago

    Waking up to the alarm sounding like it’s super loud like it is coming out of a megaphone. I usually know right then that I will get nothing done that day. I’m on 7 different types of medicines, and it seems like nothing will work when I wake up like this. Day is wasted. Or what I call a fail.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    blueangel1980,

    I’m so sorry to hear you know this feeling all too well. By any chance are you under the care of a headache or migraine specialist? https://migraine.com/blog/making-decision-see-headache-specialist/

    Take care; let me know how it’s going!

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • Janet
    4 years ago

    I just would like to know if it will ever end…moving to Atlanta from Las Vegas has proved a disaster migraine wise…sunny days and no humidity to hot, humid, rainy weather has increased an already overloaded migraine frequency..back to chronic daily

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    Janet,

    That certainly is a dramatic move, from the emotional toll it must’ve taken (no matter how excited–or not–you were to move) to the drastic changes in weather. Happily, a lot of folks do get used to the crazy ups and downs of Georgia weather–I hope you reach equilibrium soon. In the meantime, I hope you will seek the help of a migraine or headache specialist to see if anything can be done to reduce the impact this illness is having on your life.

    https://migraine.com/blog/making-decision-see-headache-specialist/

    Fellow Janet in Georgia, I wish you well. Please let me know how things are going, and accept my apology for taking so long to respond to your comment!

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • Kris
    4 years ago

    Right there with you, though, for me, just the act of opening my eyes can bring on a migraine. Today is one of those days. I’ve learned to do many tasks with my eyes closed.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    Kris,

    Thanks for this post, though it is so sad to think of opening one’s eyes to yet another day affected by migraine. Have you read our series on sleep triggers? Here’s the first of many articles about sleep-related migraine triggers. I hope you may be able to mine the articles for some information that may help you live through more migraine-free days.

    https://migraine.com/blog/migraine-triggers-sleep-1/

    Take care,
    Janet G. “The Migraine Girl”

  • amyfenn1
    4 years ago

    Yep, same thing happened to me today. I woke up feeling pretty good, then turned over to get up and WHAM! It’s an ongoing battle, and I hate it. I try to push on through my day as best I can, but I’m pretty miserable.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    I feel you!

  • Madisonbrooke
    4 years ago

    This is my life! If it is not hurting right when I get up then I don’t want to move because once I sit up and stand up there it is!

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    3 years ago

    That’s so supremely frustrating. I definitely can sympathize with you!

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • Madisonbrooke
    4 years ago

    This is my life! If it is not hurting right when I get up then I don’t want to move because once I sit up and stand up there it is!

  • Poll