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Abdominal Migraines

I haven’t seen any mention of Abdominal Migraines in any of the forums. I was recently diagnosed with this. There’s very little information on the internet other than it’s commonly found in children. At 68, I’m hardly a child!

I suffered frequent migraines as a teenager and have had them sporadically through the last 50 yrs. Only recently have they become as often as 2-3 times a month.

It always begins with severe abdominal pains followed by nausea and the migraine which lasts 24-48hrs. The abdominal pains gradually taper off but the sensitivity to light and sound remains.

Anyone else had any experience?

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Comments

  • lkschafer
    1 year ago

    My daughter never had migraines as a young person. At 49 she was diagnosed with abdominal migraines. So many never ever heard of an adult having this, finally one doctor in E R, made the diagnosis. Very uncommon for adults. She is in medical field, and the doctors never heard of it. This started a month after brain surgery and her neuro said it probably started if. Hers last mainly around five days. She also has a sensitive nose to smells . This hits her every couple months. I want to take her on a cruise, but….no way can we do that. Going to get her to Cleveland Clinic. Hopefully there is something to stop this before beginning. Very high strung and stressed. Her daughter is 32 and has migraines. I pray all the time for help for her. I know one day Jehovah will answer.

  • CeliacCVS
    1 year ago

    Our son was dx’d with abdominal migraines a couple years ago. The GI dr then began using the the phrase “CVS”- cyclical vomiting syndrome- interchangeably with abdominal migraines. I believe there are close similarities between the two ailments, but I think they are actually different experiences. I mention that in case it gives you another avenue to research. Much success!

  • Marjorie Kast
    1 year ago

    Prochlorperazine 10 mg tablet, prescribed by Doctor, taken as soon as I have abdominal stress alleviates this symptom.

  • Joanna Bodner moderator
    1 year ago

    Thank you @ds for sharing your experience!

    @Abdominalx4 – I also just wanted to share a few responses that we received to your question on Twitter. Hope some of this feedback is useful!

    “Received the diagnosis while under great stress. Apparently when I am too stressed and busy for migraine, my body moves to,abdominal migraine. Example…father was ill 3 months, then died. Too stressed and busy for me to be down w migraines, had severe abdominal migraine instead”

    “I have not been diagnosed but when a severe migraine hits, abdomin hurts, my body chooses to vomit uncontrollable (volcano eruption) even if I’m laying on stomach in bed, head over side into bucket. Can not move until passes.”

    Thank you for your question!
    -Joanna (Migraine.com Team)

  • ds
    1 year ago

    I wasn’t diagnosed with migraine until 42,. at which time the doctor said I’d probably had abdominal migraine as a child. Based on literature for it, I think he’s probably right.
    So my experience isn’t the same as yours, i recognize that. But still today, it feels like there’s a blackness in me that releases itself if I’m not careful. If I push myself too hard exercising, my gut turns, It feels like I’m inside out and I’m very nauseous.. It takes half a day or more to recover. My “blood-brain” connection appears to be that gut trouble leads to headache and migraine. This is just my experience, but thinking that way seems to help me strategize and cope.
    My coping methods when I was young included Pepsi (specifically), being cold, soft things for comfort, laying down on my left side. Avoiding travel. More currently, probiotics, magnesium, and avoiding gluten.
    I’m sorry for your diagnosis, and I don’t know if I’ve helped at all, but I hope you can find strategies to start feeling better more often.

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