Why we ask about your doctor
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If you’ve ever asked a question on our forums, left a comment on an article, or responded to a Facebook post, you’ve probably discovered that there’s one question we nearly always ask:

“Are you seeing a headache specialist?”

You may be wondering why we ask this question or why it matters the kind of doctor you see.

  • Over half of those suffering from migraine have never seen a doctor about it.
  • 38% of all migraine sufferers meet the clinical threshold for preventive therapy yet only 12% of those patients actually receive preventives.
  • Early use of preventive therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of developing Chronic Migraine.
  • Primary care physicians receive about 4 hours of education on all headache disorders. That’s simply not enough time to become an expert.
  • Even a general neurologist can’t always help. Their practice covers a wide range of neurological disorders and they simply don’t have the time to keep up on the latest advances in headache medicine.
  • A headache specialist has advanced training specifically in headache disorders. This doctor has a full-time practice dedicated exclusively to headache disorders. He or she may or may not be a neurologist.

Would you trust a Jiffy Lube mechanic to work on your German sports car? Probably not.

Would you trust the neighbor boy who mows lawns to custom landscape? I doubt it.

While both the mechanic and the boy with the lawn mowing service are perfectly capable of changing a car’s oil and cutting the grass, neither are specialists. They won’t be able to advise you on the care of your precious Lambourghini or design a built-in sprinkler system for your perfectly landscaped, weed-free lawn. You would need experts.

Doesn’t your brain deserve specialized care, too?

So we ask, and ask, and ask. More often than not, our next step is to help you find a specialist. We are passionate about getting expert care to every one of you because you deserve it.

view references
  1. Buse, Dawn C, PhD, Understanding Research: What is the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) Study and what have we learned from it? American Headache Society Center for Headache Education, retrieved online at http://achenet.org/resources/ampp_studypub/
  2. Chronic Daily Headache and Chronic Migraine, American Headache Society, retrieved online http://americanheadachesociety.org/assets/1/7/NAP_for_Web_-_CDH__Chronic_Migraine.pdf
  3. Lipton, R. B. MD, Bigal, M. E. MD, PhD, Diamond, M. MD, Freitag, F. DO, Reed, M. L. PhD, Stewart, W. F. PhD. Migraine prevalence, disease burden, and the need for preventive therapy, Neurology, January 30, 2007, Vol. 68 No 5:343-349.
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