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Does migraine impact your ability to work?

Understanding you may not have the ability to miss work for numerous reasons and that there is a BIG difference between how many days you actually miss work due to migraine versus how many you could & should be missing. However, if you could, how many days a month do you think would miss due to migraine?

How about your career path, has it changed or has been impacted due to migraine?

Are you open about your migraine disease with your employer? Are they understanding?

Have you had to use FMLA? Are you on disability due to migraine?

We'd love to learn & hear more about your personal journey with migraine & work.

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  1. I was already medically retired before I began to experience Migraine.

    However, I had to quit volunteer work due to migraine. The environment and stress were triggers.

    1. I am currently on disability due to migraine headaches, plus a back injury from an auto accident in 1981.
      The migraines escalated until they became so intolerable that my employer began to look for a way to get rid of me, even though I was covered under FMLA, and had been there for 35 years.
      They sent me for a random drug test, and said that I had alcohol in my system, which they never proved, but I was in no position to fight a huge corporation, who had a history of hiring lawyers from the biggest firms in the country to fight employees suits.
      I was able to draw unemployment, for about 18 months or so, and then worked part time until my disability was finally approved.

      1. My doctor filled out an fmla form and submitted it to my school district (my employer) where I am a teacher because of my severe migraines. I’m currently in topomax twice daily, an abortive (naratriptan) and now ajovy. With all of that I still have migraines that are strong enough to really put me out of commission about twice a month. My last paycheck (May) I noticed that it was a few hundred dollars less than usual. I contacted my hr department to inquire. I was emailed back saying that my fmla only secured my job and my employer portion of my health insurance but that I must still use any remaining days/docks for the duration of my time off. Needless to say I was pretty ticked off that I was being docked pay for the day and a half I had beyond my sick leave, especially considering the numerous days I already came in to my classroom with a migraine and just suffered through the day. I was definitely under the impression that fmla covered me from being deducted wages from my salary. Needless to say, I’m pretty upset, definitely makes me feel like teachers are undervalued even more.

        1. Unfortunately, FMLA doesn't protect wages; it mostly just protects jobs. You can't lose your job while protected by FMLA, but there is no guarantee of wages. America is a little cruddy in that department. But perhaps your employer offers some kind of short term disability that could work with you?

      2. To all who still work and suffer migraines. You really need an FMLA for work if you have migraines. Just keep it current. You don't just get one and then it is good forever. Migraines are disabling while you are experiencing one. It is considered a temporary disability. The FMLA keeps you from being fired for unexcused or unscheduled absences.

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