caret icon Back to all discussions

Migraines causing depression/anxiety

Hi! Im a 20 year old college student and I can't remember having a completely headache free day. I know that I started experiencing headaches when I was around 12. I saw a neurologist last year and I started taking magnesium, CO-Q10 sumatriptan, and ondansetron. I also cut out caffeine (which never fails to shock everyone my age when i say I don't drink coffee). This worked a little but not really. In august I began taking amitriptyline but then I switched over to venlafaxine around november.

Ive done a lot of research recently in to the connection between depression/anxiety with migraines. I know that I'm not suicidal but, as I was reading through some articles about the signs/symptoms of depression/anxiety I couldn't help but identify with some of the points. I guess what Im wondering is if anyone else feels that somehow high-functioning depression has manifested itself through migraines or vice versa.

  1. Hi paige,

    Thank you for reaching out to us. Living with chronic head pain is exhausting and frustrating to say the least. Good to hear you are under a doctor's care.

    The thing about migraine and depression is, they can be comorbid conditions. This means they can occur at the same time but don't cause one another. Migraine is thought to be a genetic, neurological disease, not a symptom of any other disease.

    To make this more complicated, depression, mood issues, irritability can all be part of a migraine attack, due to the migraine process. Let me share information on this with you in this link; https://migraine.com/blog/depression-migraines-unpleasant-cousin/ and https://migraine.com/topic/prodrome-depressed-mood/ and https://migraine.com/blog/depression-as-a-prodrome-symptom/. Those articles will start you off with lots of information.

    We do have a forum topic called Migraine and Depression you can find here; https://migraine.com/topic/migraine-and-depression/

    I've found it very helpful to talk to someone professionally as I live with migraine disease. Most of us aren't prepared to live with chronic illness and may have limited coping skills, I know I did. I've learned how to live with migraine disease with the help of my counselor. Does that make sense?

    Let me know what you think,
    Nancy

    or create an account to reply.