Chronic Migraine’s Effect on Social Life

Chronic Migraine’s Effect on Social Life

Chronic migraine affects so much more than simply our pain levels. For many of us, it affects our social life, family life, our careers, and even our mental stability. Many of us have been accused of being isolated or withdrawn, nagged about not participating in events, and even told we just are not trying to “push through it” in order to be around more.

Isolation

Are we ever isolated from those we love and care about? Yes, but for good reason. The symptoms that are associated with migraine and chronic migraine can make it impossible to be around a lot of other people. This has nothing to do with us not appreciating the invitation to dinner or not wanting to simply hang out with you. The numerous symptoms that we deal with as part of a migraine do not give us much of an opportunity to entertain, be entertained, or go out and about. These symptoms include but are not limited to sensitivity to lights, sensitivity to sounds, sensitivity to smells, vision disturbances, nausea, and vertigo. So while a movie and popcorn on the couch seems like no big deal to you, it can be pure torment for us.

Not partaking, not antisocial

There are many times when we have to elect to not partake in various events or occasions because of possible migraine triggers. Things that would not affect a healthy individual can be extra costly to the rest of us. Something as simple as staying up late over the weekend can lead to our heads revolting the next day or even that same night. Going out to bars, concerts, or parties can also easily trigger a migraine. These locations and events can be hard on us because of their smoky and very loud environments. While everybody assumes we are simply being antisocial, we generally wish we could be there making memories with you instead of hiding away in the safety of our dark bedroom.

Spoon theory

You will commonly see contributors mention the Spoon Theory; it was written by Christine Miserandino on youdontlooksick.com. The moral of the story is a powerful one: we can only do so much within our own individual limitations. Due to the war going on inside of our bodies, we have a limited amount of energy compared to healthy individuals, which causes our limitations to be different than those of a healthy individual. It is beyond important for us to remember to not overdo it and push ourselves too much. Sometimes even if we are not in a ton of pain, we may simply not have the energy to go out to movies, a concert, or dinner. Especially when we still have to do things like care for children or pets, prepare meals, or do laundry. It is on us to figure out what all we can possibly get done and to do those most important or necessary things first, which can leave us with no energy for some extras even if they are fun filled events. Unfortunately, many of us are faced with significant others, friends, or family who simply do not understand this concept and cannot see beyond the fact that we said we cannot go with them. It is not as simple as ‘pushing through the pain,’ like so many people believe.

Putting yourself first

I can say from experience, once you start living your life by doing what is best for you and then the rest of the world if you can, things will eventually be easier on you. You will definitely learn which friends are really there for you and not for what you can do for them. When the dust clears, the people who are still there are the most important ones. I won’t lie, it was hard when I first started telling people “no, I cant…” but everybody survived and while they may pout for a day or two, they will ultimately get over themselves. I know we all have a big fear of letting other people down, but at the end of the day you have to put yourself first because nobody else is going to do it for you.

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

View Comments (38)
  • StormKat
    3 months ago

    There is such TRUTH in this article. I believe my life took a turn for the better when I just started taking care of me! Forget what other people think! I ALWAYS tried to please everyone and keep the peace. I now have let go of caustic people in my life who add stress and a migraine or two. Life is too short. I have enough Love inside me to share but now, if you don’t reciprocate that Love…I can’t be your stepping stone. BTW fortunately I have a VERY SUPPORTIVE husband and Thank God for his support!

  • bet
    3 months ago

    why is it that someone can make so dads to be can feel how it feels how giving birth!! why cant they find away to feel the pain we go through?! there is other sicknesses that don’t show the pain people go through!! yet doctors know these things are a fact but most don’t care enough to help us with! I wouldn’t want others to go through the pain I do. I just was told that I have cancer in my blood! doing treatments but with everything till now I thought why? what did I ever do to keep getting more painful things !! As you say if they cant feel it or see it in test or x-rays mri or any other test they just cant get it. its a sad fact of life even having gout isn’t as painful as having migraines! it hurts bad enough and its in my feet and joints. so I can tell you hurts to walk but you can still get around!! the migraines you just cant get away from!! with gout you don’t want it to hurt you just don’t move a lot you can still do things cook, clean , take care of things then just watch what you eat. the only time I can say gout gets as bad as migraines is having gout hit every joint hurts at the same time. and hope not to set off a migraine at the same time!!! so hoping everyone has a migraine free days..!!!

  • Rhonda
    3 months ago

    That’s a wonderful article. Very well put. I’d like to print out a few copies and send them to people who don’t seem to understand what it’s like to be in constant chronic pain day after day. I’m always being told that I take way too much pain medicine. My doctor has me on 4 different preventive meds and I take Imitrex to get rid of the migraine. If I have a really bad one that just won’t respond to anything, I will take Norco to break it up. That doesn’t even occur every week. People think I am constantly taking pain meds when in reality I don’t. It hurts when family members come short of calling me a drug addict. I find myself avoiding the company of certain relatives because of their judgments. Migraine is a misunderstood disease even now in the 21st century. How do you make people understand that it’s more than ‘just a headache’ when they refuse to let you explain why you take the meds in the first place?

  • DizzyLizzy7
    3 months ago

    Amanda,
    Thank you. You put this so well. I recently dropped all commitments because it was so stressful for me to have to cancel at the last minute. It pains me to disappoint others and to miss out on family , social, church, and civic engagements.
    I now do put my health needs first and may learn that I don’t need to try to justify or explain this. My true friends, and my family gets it. Remembering that “No.” is a complete sentence and using the phrase” that won’t work for me.” helps. Letting go of trying to be understood and/ or expecting others to understand migraines is helpful. Heck, lot’s of the doctors I’ve dealt with don’t understand migraine, why should the general public be different?

    Something that helped me was to look drop in activities and social groups. Instead of paying for and enrolling in an art class and then not being able to attend, I’ve found drop in groups including a weekly life drawing opportunity.
    I can find art lessons online.

    It can be challenging to take good care of one’s self. Women in particular are not conditioned to put themselves first.

  • deedeevee1
    3 months ago

    What social life?? Intractable Migraine Disease for 10 yrs now=0 social life. People just got tired of hearing “I’m a definite maybe”. Can’t blame them.

  • StormKat
    3 months ago

    I worked for 22 years as an aircraft mechanic. I took great pride in my work. 15 of those years were riddled with chronic migraines which are still ongoing today. I was on FMLA and unfortunately have the type of migraines that last 72 hours +. I would have to take off 1-3 days per week sometimes. It was awful, having the migraines and suffering the abuse of co-workers. Because migraine is a disease of invisibility, I actually had a lead crew chief who told me to just not think about it (The Migraine) and it would go away. I would work as long as I could and was tough on myself, when I should have went home. I would come back to work and the guys would say glad you could finally make it…or did you enjoy your vacation. It didn’t matter if I explained to them that I had literally spent 3 days in bed, writhing in absolute agony. No social life, missing Birthday parties. I even had a doctor tell me he didn’t want to fill out my FMLA paperwork because I would get fired. I found another GOOD physician. He was also the one who refused to give me ANYTHING for pain. He told me we don’t give pain medication to migraine patients because they can become addicted. He said I should push though it. No one, physicians or otherwise could comprehend the agony. So with the technological advancement of smartphones I began 8 years ago keeping a video migraine diary. I showed it to one physician and I could tell that she was shocked to see this beautiful woman setting in front of her, to see her in so much agony. I honestly was at the point of considering taking my own life. I finally found a Doctor who agreed to give me “just enough” pain medication to get by every month. But I am beyond grateful and I can’t imagine going back to the way things were before. I still have excruciating days. Or an off month where I have migraine auras every other day. It my quality of life has improved with pain medication. I don’t feel like an outcast, I can go to that Birthday party instead of missing it. I don’t want to make it sound like it is all roses because it is not but it is so much better, so much better. I would like to go back to work but NEVER with those uncaring, insensitive people…maybe someday.

  • cash80221
    3 months ago

    I wanted to let you know the website you give for the Spoon Theory is incomplete. It is “www.butyoudontlooksick.com”.

  • hikerbiker
    8 months ago

    I can barely go to church or bible study any more. I have asked for consideration in space allocated for people with sensitivities to smells, one of my triggers. Could we possibly have a space for the sufferers as well as people who know they aren’t bathed in perfume, aftershave or other fragrances who could sit together? It seems like it might be a big ask. But there are seats allocated for parents and small needy infants, chairs that can move for wheelchair folks. An area for the hearing impaired. See my point? Migraine is invisible to most unless you know the drill or live with someone who does. I wish it were taken as seriously as visible disabilities. I also have decided that I have to ask, no matter what. I even remind friends now before we go out, please no perfume. Most friends are aware and don’t forget, but there are some that are aloof enough I need to say something. I also have no problem leaving a venue now if I think I will suffer a headache following due to the environment. As for social life? Well, as I said even church is a challenge, social activities are best avoided because it is a bigger ask when people are all dressed up and going out to socialize. My favorite social activity is my backyard patio, fresh air, and my slightly better control over smells, foods, drinks, distance between people, etc. Scratch that!!!The beach is even better. It’s sea level (I suffer at most elevation) and the salty sea air and sand are usually fragrance free and liberating.

  • laurahildebrand
    8 months ago

    What social life? My husband left me about 12 months after my migraine went chronic. My friends and family have busy, hectic lives of their own to live. I don’t want to be a parasite on them. My daughter is finishing her sophomore year of college and has a new boyfriend. I’ve let her down too many times to count. I just realized tonight that she will be gone in two years. At least now she spends her breaks and summers with me. She’s the only person I have left. I have chronic intractable migraine. I have a migraine every single day. The only places I go are doctors’ appointments and I usually try to get a ride with one person who will help me out. I have developed somewhat of a phobia of leaving my house, especially the driving part. Happy guess my fear is being somewhere by myself and having a migraine attack. This is just no way to live. People aren’t meant to spend all their lives alone.

  • ChronicallyEverything
    3 months ago

    I’m sorry your husband left you, but don’t feel like you’re the only one. After 16 years together, and having married me knowing my health was horrible and would get worse, my husband left me too in June of 2017. He also walked out on our daughter, leaving her with my chronically ill self who was in the beginning of what I know now is called intractable chronic migraine. I had been chronic for several years by that time, but I had been intractable at that moment for about 2 months and had just started Trokendi xr about 10 days before THAT day. I was adjusting to the god awful side effects of that drug and still dealing with the intractable migraine when he decided I was too sick to live with and he was tired of being the victim of my illnesses – that was code for he was tired of me spending all of his money on doctors appointments and medications. Its been really hard, it was super hard at 1st, but it’s been getting better. Until last week when he quit his job and he caused me to lose my insurance and so now I can’t see my pain management Dr anymore. Don’t know how that’s going to work out bc he’s supposed to cover me and our kid by our separation contract, but whatever. I’ll work it out. He was toxic anyways. He’s still saying he’s a victim lol. That he couldn’t quit his job when he wanted to bc he had to pay child support made him a victim. That he has to get another job asap, before child support enforcement finds out he quit his last one and send a him to jail, makes him the victim even though CSE won’t pay us unless they can collect from him and my daughter and I have no other income other than that child support. Lolol! Sorry for the rant. I’ve been losing my mind over this “he’s the victim” crap! Hahaha

  • Kristine Ullemeyer
    3 months ago

    I am sorry your husband left you, that is shameful. I have the same type of migraines. I understand just what you are feeling, I myself lost most of my friends. I also stay at home a lot because I can’t drive. I go to palates and Dr appointments. You are in my heart. Feel better.

  • Dove1919
    3 months ago

    I so understand your pain. After 25 years of suffering increasingly worsening migraines, I’ve had chronic migraines for the last several years. I’m very isolated. The only person I know who I think understands my struggle is the Lord. If I were not a strong believer, I don’t know that I’d be here anymore the physical and emotional pain can be so overwhelming. I finally had to quit working (or get fired) so the ‘hits’ keep coming. But I keep getting back up, I don’t want this disease to win. Don’t you let it either! I pray you obtain supernatural strength to deal with the challenges.

  • Amanda Workman moderator author
    8 months ago

    Unfortunately I do understand. I have chronic daily migraines, the only thing that varies is the level of the pain. I’m sorry your husband couldn’t stand with you through this struggle; it really says more about him than it says about you I promise. I also take someone to appointments with me, there is nothing wrong with that. I’ve learned it helps catch all the information. Sending you lots of love and strength
    Amanda Workman (moderator and contributor)

  • nikki54902
    8 months ago

    I try to have a social life… but it feels impossible. I work full time, have 3 sons (all in robotics, rugby, and hockey), and commute a distance for work. There is no time to be incapacitated by migraine. Between my 15 migraines/month and issues with back spasms, I’ve finally found some relief with botox every 3 months (for the migraines and in my back for spasm), but it’s imperfect. It’s always a pull between the two issues… just getting through the day and completing all the necessary tasks feels heavy. There just isn’t one thing that seems able to be omitted. Like, I refuse to call into work unless I truly can’t walk/move from my back or am throwing up from the migraine. I power through. I can’t imagine not taking my kids to their activities or being there to see them in their games. I don’t want to miss anything. But I feel like a washed out ghost when I’m there. It’s so hard to really enjoy, really love being part of things when it’s everything you’ve got to just… be. I’m short tempered and probably less fun to be with when I can’t think from the migraine and feel sick. I don’t know if it’d be better to skip events, activities, work when I feel awful. It’s hard to let people down, and all I do if I call in or cancel is obsess over all the things I would be doing if I felt better. I want to do it all. I enjoy being part of all this stuff. I love working as a nurse and doing the job I do… and just absolutely hate having to lay in a dark room, missing it all. It sucks.

  • dragonfly1968
    8 months ago

    I don’t have a social life. I barely have family. My kids live in another country and think I just don’t have my priorities straight for not visiting them and for having moved back to the US in the first place when I couldn’t hold down a job there either and had even less of a support system there. It took me months to find a job when I moved back to the US. I lost that job not 2 months later because I just missed too much work due to my migraines and all the pre and post symptoms associated with the migraines. Now I’m dealing with other chronic symptoms that may or may not be related to the migraines (the neurologist hasn’t been able to figure out what’s causing all of my many symptoms). My family that lives nearby treat me like I’m being antisocial when I go to family events for a very short time or don’t go at all. Just the hour and a half drive there takes a huge toll on me. So I can’t hold down a job, our savings is all but gone because of the medical bills and the lack of income. I’m depressed and exhausted and see no end in sight to the constant pain (I’m now on the 4th medication in what feels like a futile attempt to control at least some of my new symptoms). And to top it all off, this morning my daughter sent me an email telling me to just get my “sh*t together”, as if I can just chose to turn off the pain and other symptoms at will. As if being separated from my children is what I want rather than what is being forced upon me. Except for my wonderful husband, no one seems to understand what I’m going through.

  • LisaMarie246
    8 months ago

    Though I agree with most of what is said, the idea that, “…doing what is best for you and then the rest of the world if you can, things will eventually be easier on you…” couldn’t be further from the truth for me.

    Doing what I should for my health has cost me a job, friends, family relationships, etc. My migraines have not improved, I am pretty much totally isolated with exception of working part time, my part time job is not enough to pay my bills so financially things have gotten worse, my depression has deepened, and I now have type 2 diabetes on top of it all.

  • litoria76
    8 months ago

    I’m in the same situation. You should try applying for Social Security Disability. At least that would help pay the bills. I’m waiting for a hearing with SSDI and hopefully they’ll finally approve me so I can get into low income housing and not depend on my mother 100%. She is 76 and has heart problems so she won’t be around forever.

  • Dove1919
    3 months ago

    I am going through the fight for Disability benefits as well. Been denied twice, now waiting for an appeal hearing before a judge. Was turned down for legal assistance because there’s not enough money to help all the financially needy people. I’ve always paid my own way, its so frustrating to not get even a little help when I’m on my last resources. My daughter and her family has moved in to help out with bills, but then I help out with three elementary age grandchildren. Whom I love very much but with chronic migraine, it exhausts me even more. Its so frustrating to not be understood, thought to be a wuss for not powering through. I’ve powered through for 25-30 years, I am beyond burnt out. But not giving up!

  • litoria76
    1 year ago

    Well said! I have lost friends over the years of my chronic daily migraine and lead a pretty solitary life except for my mom who i live with and my ex-boyfriend. They understand that all plans made with me are conditional on how I’m feeling and whether I’m able to dip into my limited supply of Percocet for a few pain-free hours…

  • Kathy
    1 year ago

    WHAT SOCIAL LIFE?! My Chronic Migraines prevent me from HAVING A SOCIAL LIFE!

  • Amanda Workman moderator author
    1 year ago

    Chronic migraine definitely makes it extremely difficult to do so many things, especially being social. It’s definitely most important to take care of yourself first before anything else. Stay strong and hopefully some of the new medicines they are working on will help us out. Sending you lots of strength and love
    Amanda Workman

  • Anne
    1 year ago

    Migraines don’t even need to be chronic to have that effect. I’m at 8 migraines a month and I still avoid concerts or places where I won’t be able to make a get-away if the pain hits. I used to love to travel, I used to love to go dancing, but migraines have taken all the fun out of life 🙁 Now, I feel like I’m just getting through. I have just enough energy to hold down a job and not much more for other things.

  • RobinfromCA
    1 year ago

    I have learned one thing that has helped me quite a bit. There is no place I won’t leave. If I go to a movie (where I have to sit not too close and wear earplugs-sometimes sunglasses) if I still get overwhelmed, I leave. My husband is always willing to leave with me but for potential trigger places where I (or we) go with friends, I meet them there. That way I have my own car and can bolt if I need too. Of course, I still have dark room days but it has helped me to have more control over my opportunities to see family and friends if I have a way out and I’ve given myself permission to use it.

  • Steven Workman moderator
    8 months ago

    That’s great that you have found a system that allows you to be a part of more events. Migraines can be pretty relentless in their pursuit to shut you down. Any time you are able to “beat the system” is a win. I’m sure your family and friends appreciate it as well. Often times my wife and I have to leave family functions early due to her pain level. We have even gone to dinner that went perfectly, only to come home and a migraine shows up and makes her sick just out of the blue. I’m glad you found a system to help you spend more time with your loved ones. So many people suffering today could benefit from systems like this.
    Steven Workman (moderator)

  • Amanda Workman moderator author
    1 year ago

    While 8 migraines a month doesn’t meet the standard definition of chronic migraine, it is still a lot to deal with every month. Each migraine drains you on a physical and mental level. Holding a job with say two migraines a week is still very hard to do especially by the time you figure the predome and hangover effects in with the migraine. I cannot blame you. I have a hard time committing to plans that are extra outside of the demands of my job and household requirements. You are definitely not alone. I’m sending you lots of love and strength
    Amanda Workman (moderator & author)

  • Jc3.48
    1 year ago

    Well said!
    Adaptation takes time. Finding a good Neurologist, a Pain Specialist, and a Migraine specialist, that will all work together was the most difficult part. It is worthwhile. It makes living with migraines much easier.
    Be certain to ask these questions about all medications prescribed: What is contraindicated?; What are the side effects?; What supplements should not be taken with it/them?; Can magnesium citrate affect the medication(s)?
    Read up on magnesium citrate. It is a beneficial supplement that reduces pain and aids neuro-transmitters. Very effective at reducing muscular and tension related pain.
    I’ve been supplementing with magnesium citrate for over 15 years. It makes the pain much less severe. Migraines started in 1994.
    I’m 67. Learn as much as you can. Migraine.com has greatly helped me!

  • hikerbiker
    8 months ago

    Here is one more question to ask your doctors when they prescribe medication. I made the mistake of leaving my doctor without asking about the cost of the medication they were prescribing. I had them call it in to my local pharmacy, and when they called saying they were hesitant to fill it because of the cost, I was astounded. Well, the Cambia prescribed was around 700.00, and the Sumitriptan epi style injectable pen was a few hundred. The Cambia was for 4 pills! And 2 pens of the sumatriptan. Well, I couldn’t afford that. I called the doctor back and waited for a few days for them to reconsider the prescriptions. Toradol (sp?) was substituted for Cambia at 20.00 and the pens with generic sumatriptan were 100.00. Now I need to do my research and make sure the meds do what I want them to do. My point is and many people probably already know to do this, is to ask about cost and optional replacements while in the office. I sometimes am in the office with a terrible migraine, and can hardly get through the appointment let alone remember to ask some important questions.

  • Amanda Workman moderator author
    1 year ago

    We are definitely glad that our articles have helped you in your migraine journey. We definitely hope to always be able to continue to help you in this challenge. Your questions are definitely very good ones and everybody should remember to always ask about any vitamins, while they are not prescribed doctors need to be aware of them.
    Amanda Workman (moderator & author)

  • Laura Bascietto
    1 year ago

    All types of chronic ongoing pain including migraines cause significant amounts of draining non-stop fatigue. It is like our energy is drained by our pain and we have to fight through that to get the things that are necessary in our lives to get done. It is one of the most frustrating aspects of dealing with migraines as most people don’t “feel” or “see” our debilating fatigue….plus all the environmental sensory stimuli overload (strong light, noise, odor, etc.) that adds to it to make it even worse. Many of us also have more than migraines to deal with and feel like we are just burdens and complications not only to our doctors but our loved ones. And many of the things that are necessary for you to do for your health conditions (not drinking, not smoking, maintaining a good weight, exercising, etc.) also seem to take even more time for one struggling through the “mud” of the fatigue in addition to the pain! As someone who weighed 300 lbs in her 20’s (maintained since between 140-170 lbs), I have to be extremely attentive to watching my food intake and exercising thus I don’t go places with food to tempt me….since that is just about everywhere I am a homebody and isolated as well…me and my kitty, Snickerdoodle (oops, that is a great cinnamon cookie!). Thanks for being there.

  • Amanda Workman moderator author
    1 year ago

    Our never ending pain is definitely draining; especially since so many of us seem to have multiple chronic conditions at once. It can absolutely be so challenging to manage / handle. Unfortunately since so much of our illnesses are “invisible” it is hard to make others understand what we are dealing with…
    I remember seeing an article about a famous person being treated by a hospital for fibro and thinking we would not make it past triage. This just goes to show there is so much more work needed to be done in the medical community for our conditions.
    Your weight management accomplishment is an amazing and overwhelming in its own!!! That is something to be so PROUD of yourself for achieving. I hope you own that achievement everyday!
    Sending you lots of love.
    Amanda Workman (moderator & author)

  • John1381
    1 year ago

    Your post matches my difficulties with managing chronic migraine, I am struggling with feeling isolated as we don’t go out and I just haven’t got the energy any more. It is a dear friends 60th tonight and all my friends that I haven’t seen in a long while will be there. I have been in torment all day about whether I can make it; tears, self-recrimination, get a grip etc- all good stuff! I can’t do it though. Sometimes it is just too much. My wife always says it’s just for now you may get better sometime, I love her positivism but I am hitting 50 and no sign of improvement yet.

    Just keeping the dog entertained is about as much as I can manage, he’s worth it though.

    Thanks for your post, it hit the spot today.

    Good luck all,

    John.

  • bluebird
    8 months ago

    I hear you.

  • Luna
    1 year ago

    I don’t even bother going to social events anymore. They are held in toxic buildings and after being there for 20 minutes my brain is scrambled and conversation is too much of an ordeal. It’s no fun even being there anymore. Then I get to pay for the experience for several days. And that doesn’t even address the problem of driving. My oldest sister turns 81 next month and is having a party. If I go the day will have to be wildfire smoke free. It is 25 miles away and in the city that I avoid like the plague to be around people that have no contact with me anyway.

  • Luna
    1 year ago

    Had a rough night before but just after my sisters party started decided I felt well enough. Another sister and her husband was to be there that I hadn’t seen for 6 years so didn’t want to miss it. Was really thankful that I was able to be at the party. Took me a week to recover though. Thanks for asking.

  • DonnaFA moderator
    1 year ago

    Hi Luna! I’m at once so glad you got to attend and see your family, and sorry that you dealt with a bad week following. I hope this finds you feeling much better. -Warmest wishes, Donna (Migraine.com team)

  • Amanda Workman moderator author
    1 year ago

    I personally I do not attend many events myself. If we do, I make sure we are parked in a way that we can leave without getting blocked in by other cars etc. We definitely do not host holiday events at our home because I generally cannot stand that much commotion for that long of a time period.
    I hope you were able to attend the get together and not have to suffer so much for it afterwards. It’s always hard to have to miss important events in other people’s lives.
    Sending you much love and strength
    Amanda Workman (moderator & author)

  • Luna
    1 year ago

    I don’t even bother going to social events anymore. They are held in toxic buildings and after being there for 20 minutes my brain is scrambled and conversation is too much of an ordeal. It’s no fun even being there anymore. Then I get to pay for the experience for several days. And that doesn’t even address the problem of driving. My oldest sister turns 81 next month and is having a party. If I go the day will have to be wildfire smoke free. It is 25 miles away and in the city that I avoid like the plague to be around people that have no contact with me anyway.

  • Luna
    1 year ago

    That is strange. I clicked post comment once and it posted the comment twice. Strange but it just fits. Life is strange at times.

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