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Pooping as migraine relief (yes, I said it)

Last year I came clean (or shall I say “unclean”?) and talked frankly about a very ugly side of migraine for many of us sufferers: IBS, diarrhea, constipation, and other stomach and poop issues. The responses were myriad, and several of you thanked me for laying it out on the line even though I was pretty uncomfortable doing so. Turns out even more people than I thought have stomach and intestinal issues that are likely to be related to our migraine disease.


But here’s something else related to this whole topic: pooping as migraine relief. (The first time someone close to me mentioned this to me, I definitely thought to myself, “What the….?”) I have a group of buddies who have had migraines for many years and used to compare notes when younger. My friend said, “My sister and I called them ‘poop headaches,’ because once we were able to poop, we felt immediately better.”

My analytical self wonders if maybe, for them, the migraine was already starting to dissipate and the need to use the restroom was just one last step before the pain totally subsided. But perhaps there’s something more to it. As I myself have never found migraine relief after going #2, I can’t identify with their story, but I admit that I am very, very curious. (Note: I have felt a little better after finally vomiting after having migraine with nausea, but no such luck with the poo-poo.)

Have you ever felt a migraine subside after you were able to make a bowel movement? Does this resonate at all with you, or am I sounding like a crazy person? If you’re willing to share, we’re willing to listen!

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • hlbx
    4 months ago

    Yes! I’ve had this a couple of times and I’ve thought that maybe it’s similar to why people die from a brain aneurysm whilst on the loo – any thoughts? The straining sometimes helps! TMI?
    I’m a paediatric nurse and we do get a lot of children suffering with stomach migraines but I feel like this is a little bit different.

  • Elyse
    7 months ago

    I have been searching desperately for someone who knows anything about this problem! I get headaches several times a week. They always start in the back of the neck and settle in the temples and around my eyes. In addition, I get feeling really ill and I feel gassy. After I have several bowel movements the headache lessens. I feel wiped out but headache free for the rest of the day. If I eat anything, it starts all over again! I take Milk of Magnesia caplets everyday to keep my bowels going. I also drink Miralax twice a day. The tight neck, which turns into a full blown migraine (nausea, sometimes vomiting), comes several times a week and is only relieved with going poop. I am not overweight and eat healthy foods. I make a point to drink lots of water. ANY IDEAS WHAT TO DO TO LESSEN THIS? Has anyone’s doctor been able to HELP??? Desperate for some solution to this!!

  • WillR
    9 months ago

    I totally get this. It’s not the case for all migraines I have but sometimes my body just knows that it needs to purge, almost. Whether that’s making myself sick or going to the toilet its almost always makes a huge immediate improvement in how I’m feeling.

  • chronicKenny
    9 months ago

    This is me! 100%. I’ve been telling the dr since day 1 that my migraine is completely related to my stomach and they look at me like I’m nuts. After a BM I feel like running a marathon. My migraine is nearly gone. It slowly builds back after eating meals until I feel horrible again.

  • nehaMelkani
    1 year ago

    It does works with me! Every single time! Some days my bowel movements are disturbed and I develop a throbbing headache. As soon as I’m able to take a dump the headache goes away in around 10 minutes.

  • lmack2175
    1 year ago

    Yep, if I wake with a headache and I know it’s a migraine then I take some excederin and go back to sleep. As soon as I go #2 I know 100% that my headache is going away. Actually happened this AM. I thought I was crazy also but I’m not.

  • BrianGJ
    2 years ago

    Just found this string and boy does it hit home. Since childhood I suffered with what were called sinus headaches. Medication helped but was not a sure thing. Fast forward to adulthood and the headaches continued on an almost weekly basis, usually Mondays. I’d buy the industrial size Tylenol Migraine meds at Costco since I had these headaches so often.
    One day I saw an ad for a lecture on headaches at a local hospital and thought I’d see what they had to say. They talked about headache types and triggers. Basically they were trying to sell the services of their pain management center. But one of the headache types they talked about (toxic headaches) really resonated with me. They talked about how if we don’t maintain regularity to flush these toxins from our systems, they build up and cause us varying types of pain. Although they didn’t really talk about poop I thought there might be a connection between my irregular bowel movements and my headaches.
    My research on methods to help you poop, brought me to the topic of enemas and I thought “what do I have to lose?” So I tried it. Since I didn’t have a headache when I tried it, there was no immediate or noticeable change in this area. What I did notice was a certain feeling of “relief”. I felt “lighter” and “better”
    The next time I had a headache (and after suffering for several hours) I decided to try the enema route. Much to my surprise they headache was gone in 20 minutes. This started me down the path of researching the benefits of enemas. What I found is that enemas aren’t all they are cracked up to be and can actually cause you to become dependent on them for a BM. That bit of info caused me to rethink my belief that I had found the miracle cure for my headaches. So I continued my research looking for more “natural” ways to improve regularity. What I found was that the solution was already in my kitchen, namely water, fruits and vegetables. So basically by upping my intake of fiber/roughage and making sure I was properly hydrated I’ve been able to improve my regularity to the point that if I don’t poop in the morning more that two days in a row, I can foresee a headache in my future. I have also noticed that this is more likely to happen on a Monday or Tuesday after a weekend (or vacation) when my normal dietary habits fall victim to laziness. In these cases I return to my original solution and pull out the enema bag and Wha La, I’m as good as new in about 20 minutes. Luckily, based on what I’ve learned, this doesn’t happen very often.
    I have a sister and niece who both suffer from migraine headaches and have even been to the ER seeking relief. but they refuse to listen when I tell them that relief may be only a couple quarts of water away. The “ick factor” I guess more than out weighs the potential for relief. Oh well. Sometimes you can lead a horse to water ……

  • Laur52
    1 year ago

    From your story, one could theorize that constipation (storage of feces in the lower colon, which stretches the colonic wall) stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, increasing cerebral vasodilation and the risk or severity of a migraine. Too much parasympathetic stimulus can also cause premature emptying of the colon (ie) before most of the water has been reabsorbed, which makes the feces more liquid and which we call diarrhea. That is why constipation and diarrhea are sometimes associated, constipation from older retained contents, diarrhea from the newly arrived.

    The improvement of migraine symptoms may thus be due solely to more regular bowel habits (resulting from a higher fiber diet and better hydration) minimizing colon distention, rather than from cleansing of toxins from the system.

    Whatever the mechanism, you seem to have discovered something that works, and is healthy, so go with it.

  • Elyse
    7 months ago

    Can you be more specific on how I can improve my colon function and reduce the killer headache?

  • reneofc
    2 years ago

    What do you all do to alleviate this? I wake up with a headache in my sinus area—feels dry—-feels better after a BM but when I sense there is more to eliminate it might get worse after initial BM….happens maybe one a month, oddly after a chiropractic adjustment…don’t know if that’s related. Usually the BM is bordering on diarrhea but once I flush out, headache is gone and i feel great. Trying to figure out triggers…gluten, onions and broccoli cause me distress…but not always…maybe in some combination…not sure. What else Can I do? Headache is debilitating. Thanks….

  • Laur52
    2 years ago

    This makes complete sense. The theorized mechanism for migraine is vasodilation of intracranial arterioles, which increases the volume of the tissue inside the skull, which increases the pressure and hence causes pain, often throbbing in synchrony with heartbeat (cyclical blood pressure rise).

    One of the mediators of vasomotor tone is the autonomic nervous system, parasympathetic causing vasodilation, and sympathetic causing vasoconstriction. The autonomic nervous system also responds to and affects other organ systems, a major one being the gastrointestinal tract. Among other things, a distended colon causes a parasympathetic stimulus. This stimulus could also encourage vasodilation of cerebral blood vessels, causing or potentiating migraines.

    Once defecation (pooping) has occurred, the autonomic balance becomes less parasympathetic, and more sympathetic, which would result in a relatively greater degree of vasoconstriction, thus decreasing the migraine.

    The fact that this is the case for many people would seem to validate the theory. That it does not work for all, underlines the fact that there are multiple mechanisms that contribute to cerebral vasomotor instability. For instance, progesterone, responsible for many peri-menstrual symptoms, is a potent smooth muscle relaxant which likely accounts for an increased incidence of monthly migraines in pre-menopausal women. Nitroglycerine-type medications used for angina or erectile dysfunction are also vasodilators, and can cause severe migraine-like headaches.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    2 years ago

    Thank you for this! I appreciate it so much (and I feel a little less crazy for having noticed this pattern in myself from time to time). I appreciate your explanation so very much.

    Take care,
    Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • KSV1
    2 years ago

    p.s. I have no BM/IT problems. BM’s regular and normal. Headaches and need for BM not necessarily connected. But, when have headache and BM comes along…always relief. So, I don’t think, for me, one triggers other. The connection seems more…strawberries and cream compliment one another than one necessitates the other. Not causal, complementary.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    2 years ago

    Thanks, KSV1! I appreciate your comment and thoughts on the matter.

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • KSV1
    2 years ago

    Just looked up “are BMs related to migraines? What I get are cluster headaches, I think. I call them mini-migraines. Only ever had 1fb migraine. But, I have noticed, since headaches have ncreased with menopause, that they are always relieved or dissipate entirely with BM. For me, same with cramps. I hardly know my body now days.
    Thanks for posting re: this

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    2 years ago

    You’re welcome! I appreciate your comment and hope that once menopause settles down you find some relief. Take care.

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • Acal
    2 years ago

    I suffer from regular migraine/neck tension headaches – I typically get them once maybe twice per week since 2006 or so. I also suffer from IBS-like or food-intolerance symptoms – gas, constipation and diarrhea depending on the day. When I am at my absolute best of personal self-care I still experience migraines at least once per month. They generally start with mild neck tension then move up the scalp and then settle into a temple and/or an eye region at which point a more heavy duty migraine with throbbing and neurological issues sets in accompanied by nausea. Vomiting often lessens the migraine but sometimes I have vomited/dry heaved over a dozen times without relief of the headache or nausea. The heaviest of these flareups feels like a serious hangover with migraine, vomiting and pooping.

    More recently I found that if I focused on taking a BM (even if I don’t feel like I need to) I am able to reduce the headache and nausea symptoms dramatically. Often times the symptoms completely dissipate within 15 minutes of the BM. A BM will help at any stage in the headache. I have been noticing this benefit for nearly a year now. Hydrating and taking fiber supplements and eating fibrous veg certain helps this process along.

    My hypothesis on triggers for the neck / headache are: dehydration, desk and screen time (related to neck tension and constipation), and to a large extent toxic or incompatible foods, and alcoholic beverages (especially one with un-fermented maltose or sucrose like beer). I once felt that gluten was the problem and have found that sugars in the disaccharide (lactose, sucrose, maltose) and oligosaccharide (“bean-fart” sugars like raffinose, stachyose) families are probably the issue with me instead. About 3/4 of a year ago I started taking a digestive enzyme complex with every meal and even desserts and alcohol with fantastic results in reducing the frequency of symptoms (and IBS). I can eat glutenous bread or pasta again as long as I eat with these supplements (bread has a lot of sucrose and maltose). I also find that sourdough is safer since the fermentation process breaks down the disaccarides. Depending on which you get, the supplements contain many things but for me the must haves are lactase, alpha-galactosidase, and maltase. Protease and lipase are also good to support protein and fat digestion and many of the enzyme complex supplements come with those too.

    My hypothesis on why the sugars have an impact on headaches. I believe I do not effectively digest sugars in the small intestine (where they should be digested via typical enzymatic secretions) to begin with which means that the undigested sugars reach the large intestine. The flora in the large intestine now have lots of extra food to eat and ferment. This in turn means lots of CO2 gas is produced causing bloating and flatulence. But more importantly a somewhat toxic and dehydrating byproduct of this fermentation is alcohol. So that these undigested sugars certainly can contribute to the hangover like symptoms and further dehydration, constipation and migraine symptoms.

    I would also argue that this sugar rich / alcohol rich bowel encourages an imbalance in gut flora. Ergo certain beneficial flora will be crowded out or even poisoned by the high levels of ethanol and CO2. This sugar intolerance issue may be even be related to other conditions like Type 2 Diabetes, IBS or Crohn’s – who knows??? My five cents!!!!

  • yfarnham
    2 years ago

    I just read your description and feel like this is what I am going thru. I have experienced these issues for approx 10 years now and have finally boiled it down to my sugar intake and volume of water I drink.
    It is so frustrating and painful when these headaches hit. It’s even more frustrating that Doctors have no idea what your talking about when you explain the symptoms to them.
    Thank you so your 5 cents! Very informational.

  • The Migraine Girl moderator author
    2 years ago

    Dear Acal,

    First of all, I’m sorry it took me so long to read and respond to your thoughtful comment. You sound like someone who is extremely self-aware and determined to figure out what is going on with your body. It’s inspiring to me, as I have let my self-care go down the tubes a bit and need to get back in gear. As someone who has psoriatic arthritis, chronic migraine, and IBS, I know the diagnoses are related, and often I have significant relief from all three if I eat and exercise well.

    Thanks for your very helpful five cents. And sorry again it took me so long to reply!

    -Janet G., “The Migraine Girl”

  • Pelican
    2 years ago

    Hi, I’m new around here and read this with interest.
    I have always maintained that if I don’t have a BM in the morning (unable to time-wise or physiologically), then I generally end up with a migraine later in the day. My doc doesn’t believe me. He says that constipation is a symptom. But for me it’s not always constipation, it’s often the lack of opportunity.
    And sometimes a BM will help the migraine decrease in severity. Although not all the time, and generally only for a short while. When I was a child this used to be the case with vomitting too.
    I’ve had migraine since I was 7 and am not in my 40s. And OMG I wish there was a cure. I’m on day 7 of an almost continuous one now, so really fed up.

  • Joanna Bodner moderator
    2 years ago

    Hi there Pelican, Nice to have you here and taking the time to share your experience. I am happy to hear that this article resonated with you.

    I am however very sorry to hear that you have been experiencing this attack for so many days now. Have you spoken to your doctor? We always recommend doing so for an attack lasting for more than 72 hours in duration. You can read more about that here – https://migraine.com/blog/what-is-emergency/.

    Thanks again for reaching out & welcome to our community!
    Hope you begin to experience the relief that you are in great need of.

    Take good care.
    Joanna (Migraine.com Team)

  • toboro
    3 years ago

    My mother suffered from severe migraines, not often, but often enough, if you know what I mean. She used to say that defecating , if possible, would fix her right up. I find that the same holds for me. I get very very infrequent migraines, perhaps 1 or 2 per year. The last 10 years or so, they are often preceded by, or are accompanied by flashing (and growing) spirals of chevrons in my vision, which did not happen in my youth. Just this week I had the flashing and spiraling lights, and felt like a migraine was starting, but after lying down with a pillow covering my eyes to avoid light , I had (or manufactured) a feeling of impending defecation. Not like I absolutely had to, but that maybe the operation was possible. Sure enough when I did defecate – not anything substantial or noteworthy – the flashing stopped, and the MIGRAINE DID NOT develop.

    Since some theories as to the origin or cause of migraines (some of them at least) have to do with fluid/blood amounts as well as vascular blockages and such, perhaps just lowering the amount of “stuff” in one’s body is what affords the relief. The same would hold true in the case of vomiting to relieve migraines, no?

    And, even if my wife is right (she has almost daily migraines, often several per day) that “pooping as migraine relief” is a manifestation of the placebo effect, I’ll continue to believe that my Mom was right, as always.

  • headhurts
    3 years ago

    I’ve found that having a BM sometimes stops a migraine, but sometimes it makes it worse. I usually have looser stools when I have a migraine, and its seems that they’re more “aromatic”.

  • Brooke H moderator
    3 years ago

    Hi headhurst! Thank you for taking the time to share! I’m sorry that you experience bowel changes with your migraines. You are certainly not alone. For some people it’s constipation, others diarrhea. I thought you may appreciate this article on the topic also from MigraineGirl: https://migraine.com/blog/the-ugly-truth-poop-issues-and-migraine-disease/. Please come here anytime for support! Best, Brooke (Migraine.com team)

  • Leilani Siplon
    3 years ago

    Some of my migraines are relieved with a good poop, but the other migraines are accompanied by diarrhea.

  • Renee Roberts
    3 years ago

    I get vomiting often with simultaneous BM… so i end up sitting on the toilet with a bucket on my lap… not a pretty site… it feels like my body is attempting to rid itself of poison… my head feels better for a few minutes after but the headache comes right back… sometimes the processes also causes spontaneous orgasms as well. I know that sounds strange. I’ve only heard of one other person saying the same thing. would like to know how common it is.

  • Sirish
    3 years ago

    Earlier it was always nausea as the primary relief. But this last month, I must say I agree with this article. As soon as my migraine peaks (around 10-15 minutes), the first instinct is no longer nausea, but bowel movement. The moment that is done, there is a 50-70% relief in the pain. Strange, but this is happening after 30 years of living with migraine. Wish I’d known it earlier.

  • Sherri
    4 years ago

    I suffer from migraines and IBS-C, so I’m constantly taking something for the constipation. If I get extremely constipated – Yes – I get a whopping migraine. I don’t get immediate relief from going to the bathroom, but I feel better in the days after. Thank you for sharing your story!

  • victoria
    4 years ago

    I too have experienced this but not very often, and I don’t always throw up during migraines but when I do my migraines go away or weaken. I am going to mention this during my next doctors visit and maybe try a probiotic to see if it helps.

  • Dolly Ward Paice
    4 years ago

    I have to say, as a migraine sufferer and diagnosed with IBS, I’ve never found relief from this….

  • Britt
    4 years ago

    I have never found relief from a migraine by pooping. I actually find myself avoiding it because of how much worse I feel in trying to go.

  • Chere
    5 years ago

    A huge BM always means I am nearing the end of my painful portion of the migraine.
    I have quite a few food triggers (soy, msg, chocolate, aged cheeses, fermented foods, etc.)
    I highly recommend going on the Migraine Diet in “Heal Your Headache” Buchholz to figure out your triggers. I’m in week5 and have gone from 10-15migraines/mo to almost none.
    I do have other triggers: weather changes, strong smells, glare/light, skipping meals, overheating,etc. so it isn’t all food … but obviously I have some food triggers that I’ll be able to identify when I start adding foods back into my diet.
    Crossing my fingers! I’d love to reduce my use of meds via my diet.

  • pjrumsey
    6 years ago

    For me, I get a soft formed, no pain easy poop with migraines. Sadly though, no relief is sight. I do notice the more poop, the more tennitis, the more severe the headache.

  • Toronto
    6 years ago

    Yes, I have this problem about 2 times per week.

    Migraine/headache/neck-tightness occurs (often when I wake up) and I will go and with 10 minutes the headache goes away.
    Other times the symptoms will happen during the evening or night. It’s worth sharing that the size of the bowel movements can vary but sometimes a great deal of pain seems to be related to ones that are quite small (eg: size of a pen cap). Sometimes I will go again 10 minutes after if the headache persists and then finally feel relief. This is not related to constipation.

    Info about me:
    – Fast metabolism
    – Male
    – 30 years of age
    – Healthy weight (6′ x 160 lbs)
    – Eat regular meals 3x day

    I will be monitoring my diet and exercise more closely to determine if there is a correlation but any advice or suggestions would be appreciated.

  • Leilani Siplon
    3 years ago

    You totally described my situation. I have not evaluated my diet, but I have added magnesium which makes me poop more. Maybe I need to stop the magnesium?

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    6 years ago

    Hi Toronto,

    Gastric stasis, delayed stomach emptying, can be part of a migraine attack for some people. You can read about this in this link; http://migraine.com/migraine-types/gastric-stasis-migraine/.

    Keeping a migraine journal may be very helpful with this. There are many apps available now for smart phones, you can always use your computer. The Migraine Meter is one of many you can take a look at; http://migraine.com/migraine-meter/.

    Nancy

  • cancan
    6 years ago

    I have suffered from migraines since I was 3 years old (I need to write my story on the Migraine.com site),. I am now 73 years old and have had them worse than ever for the past 10 years, but they have always been horrible! But when I was young, my mother used to give me an enema after vomiting with the migraine…this seemed to put off the next migraine for at least a week, or sometimes two weeks. So, yes, I do think the intestines, stomach, nerves, stress, etc…has to do with migraines, at least with my body experiences. I have tried everything imaginable in my 70 years of suffering…but not all sufferers are the same. It would be WONDEFUL if there were no such thing as a migraine. I am shocked that I am still living!!! If it wasn’t for codeine, I
    would not have had a life!

  • ares
    3 years ago

    hi carolyn can you say me how do you take codaine ? in pills or enema or ? thanks

  • georgiaslesinger
    6 years ago

    I never have bowel problems of any kind unless I get a migraine. So, for me it’s the migraine causing the bowel/digestive problems and not the other way around.

  • bere
    6 years ago

    When I first started getting migraines many years ago now, I went to the migraine institute in Toronto and toldthem I was sure it was connected to my bowels because the bowel symptoms started first..but, it was not taken seriously. Now I have chronic bowel problems with migraines and ‘sometimes’ a good go, will take away the migraine but not always. In my case they are 100% related and the situation gets progressively worse and it is hard to go at all even with fiber, lots of water, apple sauce, the dreaded prune juice and exercise. It seems there are different types of migraines and I would like to hear more about the gut / head connection and how to reverse the damage.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    6 years ago

    Hi bere,

    It is amazing when doctors treat us like we have no idea what is going on with our bodies! IBS, irritable bowel syndrome can be comorbid (means they occur at the same time but are not caused by one another) with migraine. Have you ever looked into IBS? We do have some information on gastroparesis in this link; https://migraine.com/blog/migraine-gastroparesis-nausea-vomiting-and-diarrhea/.

  • Stephen Rodrigues
    6 years ago

    This is a type of brain-gut connection it is a function of the discombobulate gut neurotransmitters. When Migraines or headaches are effectively treated the connect will resolve. Wellness, exercise, Myofascial Release techniques, Vitamins and Minerals esp Magnesium Glycinate and Herbal Lithium will help. In severe cases an SSRI will help. Do your research and talk to your doctor. I’ve been in medicine for 30 yrs and doing pain therapy for 15 yrs. Therapy meaning it is possible to treat pain issues with a combination of techniques used over decades and millennia. It started out as studying Acupuncture and I wound up stumbling upon Janet G. Travell, MD and C. Chan Gunn, MD. These 2 pioneers in pain treatments have textbooks on the subject. Their protocols can treat and reverse the tissue trigger points in complex pain issues from headaches/lower back pain to Fibromyalgia to neuropathy. They see pain as in the muscle tissues and NOT in the nerves proper.

  • deborah fayette
    6 years ago

    I have a time or two experienced nearly total relief of headache pain following a BM. Embarrassing though, I experience extremely excessive intestinal gas that seems to get even worse while in a bad cycle of chronic daily headaches.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    6 years ago

    Hi deborah,

    Many people with migraine have intestinal issues. We have some information on this you can read about in this link; http://migraine.com/blog/migraine-gastroparesis-nausea-vomiting-and-diarrhea/

  • Diana-Lee
    6 years ago

    I certainly can’t say I’ve ever had this experience, but sometimes my migraine attacks will start to receed after I vomit. Could just be coincidence, though. Gastroparesis (gastric statis) is part of the migraine attack, no emptying our stomachs may signal an end to the attack.

  • TNmigGal
    6 years ago

    Don’t remember that ever helping, but I definitely notice ‘tummy’ troubles before and/or during a migraine attack – usually diarrhea or intestinal cramps. I’m glad people are willing to talk about the ‘dirty’ side of migraines – the more information we have, the better prepared we can be. Who knows, it may have an impact on some study or research that may have been overlooked in the past…

  • georgiaslesinger
    6 years ago

    Same here. First sign of migraine for me is the scintillating scotoma. Second sign is violent cramps and diarrhea. Then it get’s worse from there:(

  • Diana-Lee
    6 years ago

    My thoughts exactly!

  • DebbyJ56
    6 years ago

    Nope, sorry to say that has never helped.

  • MickRain
    2 years ago

    This!

    Since nobody has mentioned it yet, I’d like to. I believe it may have something to do with Histamines. I’ve had headaches since I was a teenager and I’m now in my mid thirties. Took me quite a while to figure it out, but I believe my headaches are related to histamine. I usually get a delayed migraine, one to two days after I did something wrong, like drinking alcohol. Basically, once the offending “input” reaches the ‘right’ part of the intestine, I get a headache. I know histamine is a factor because I took some zinc pills once which were zinc plus histidine. Got the worst headache ever from those. Turns out histidine gets turned into histamine in the body. Why anyone would put those into pills is beyond me to be honest.

    Thus, pooping can either fix the headache or start it. I actually have a headache right now, which started with a poop. I had a small headache earlier, then I had to go and the pain went away. Some minutes later it hit really hard and I got nausea as well. I was able to go again and it hit me even harder. Now I can’t go unfortunately and I’m waiting to be able to go to get rid of my headache. The nausea is gone after eating (I ate a lot). Eating for some reason fixes the nausea in many cases and I hope to “push through” whatever is causing the headaches right now.

    The reason I drank alcohol two days ago? I’m testing out DAO supplements. Helped over the holidays, I was able to drink some beer and whiskey with a DAO pill or two with the family and I had zero headaches. I also had really great BMs, every morning. I could even feel it. After the initial BM, I had abdominal pain (and stayed on the loo) and lo and behold, the bowels moved again. Was on the loo for like 10 minutes, moving stuff several times until the pain subsided. I felt ’empty’ after that and really good. That was yesterday, so unfortunately it seems that now I pay the price for making space for whatever food leftovers made it to the wrong spot now. Having had very low water intake may have aggravated it (long flight, i.e. less water than usual plus very dry air for 8 hours).

    So basically that’s how I think a BM can fix a headache or cause it by either getting rid of (or making space for it to move) the stuff that releases the histamine or making space for it to move to the place where it can do its damage.

    I also get headaches from alcohol free beer (as alcohol is just what blocks even more DAO), some foods but not others that are supposedly high in histamine, sugary drinks, fermented foods sometimes, too many tomatoes, but not always etc.

  • Poll