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Has anyone else used fiorciet for headaches & migraine?

I have used fioricet for my headaches and migraines for 6 years and was able to get my life back. I'm frustrated because now doctors do not want to prescribe it saying it was an old medication and an addictive medication. I'm like if I was addicted I already would be. So not a good reason to take me off of it. And even though it's older doesn't mean it doesn't work, as a matter of fact I have PTSD seizuires and it also helps with that . Relaxing me when I'm around a lot of people. The doctors say it's not for that give me depression medicine say take motrin for the headaches and migraines . That firing me as a patient when I refuse it. I am not depressed . Please anyone I'm in Ohio please help me get my life back.

  1. Hi Tammy, thank you for reaching out! I hear how gut-wrenching it feels to have a medication that has been offering you some relief be pulled away due to its nature as a narcotic. It is so incredibly frustrating. You are not alone having your doctor deny or severely limit a prescription for fioricet. While you wait for others to share their experiences, I thought this discussion might be of interest to you:
    https://migraine.com/q-and-a/any-other-suggestions/
    I hope you are able to find a treatment option to help you manage your symptoms. Please know we are always here to listen when you need support. Wishing you a gentle day. ~Allyson (Migraine.com team)

    1. Hi Tammy williams,

      Thank you for your difficult question. I understand how frustrating it is when you find a medication that may be seemingly beneficial, and doctors what to change that. Having said that, it's true fioricet may not be the best option for treating migraine attacks. Here's why - pain relievers (whether they're over-the-counter or prescription) don't stop a migraine attack, which is what we want to do, they mask pain. There are medications out there called triptans that do stop a migraine attack from progressing if taken at the first sign of the attack. Let me share information on this type of medication with you; https://migraine.com/?s=triptans.

      When we have four or more severe migraine attacks a month, it's time to discuss migraine prevention with the doctor. I wonder if it's time to find a doctor who is more knowledgeable in treating migraine disease? There are over 20 doctors who are board certified in headache medicine, which is not the same as being certified in neurology, in Ohio! Here is the link; http://www.ucns.org/globals/axon/assets/12884.pdf.

      I hope that helps, please let me know how you make out,
      Nancy

      1. If you had a medication regimine that was beneficial, it seems odd for a doctor to change it unless you were having side effects.

        Did you change doctors?

        I had a similar experience with benzodiazapienes. In very small doses they help me with multiple ailments and I often had to advocate for myself with new providers. (I have socialized healthcare and my doctors often quit or relocate and I get a new one)

        Overtime, my medical records spoke for themselves, showing that I had reqular, long term use without addictive tendancies.

        About 2 yrs ago, I had a doctor recommend clonozapam for migraine, which was convienant as I already had them.

        While pain relieving medications (and especially opiods) can,cause rebound headaches or other side effects, each person is unique and is their medication response.

        Try to express to your doctors that you understand thier concerns and recommendations (and do seriously consider them), but I encourage everyone towards self-advocacy.

        Sometimes, the patient does know best.

        May you have access to compassionate, understanding providers and effective therapies.

        Hugs

        1. fioricet

          I didn't even know what this was.

          It's specifically for tension headache, but commonly prescribed off-label for migraine. Works on GABA system which is shown to have a role in anxiety disorders also.

          Off-label use is common. (Clonozapam for migraine is off-label yet common. And for me it works. Triptans fail)

          fioricet is Not an opiate.

          It is a narcotic, but pain reliever spcifically. It is a sedative-hypnotic mixed with and anti-inflamatory and caffiene. The combined effect of these medications can lead to pain relief.

          As a sedative-hypnotic (the barbituatel element, it is understandable that it would help with ptsd related anxiety, panic,etc.

          Just because it is an old drug is also a poor reason to stop prescribing it.

          Asprin is old.

          Long-term use of fioricet can be physically addictive and should be tapered or supplementes. Also long term use can cause liver damage. And it is easy to overdose (alone or with other meds) to toxic levels.

          But sometimes we accept the potential harm in exchange for the immediate help.

          I've had to say to my doctors "I understand the risk and am sticking with my choice" (Usually in response to refusing a treatment)


          Migraine is so darned complex! Lol

          I actually get no pain relief from Clonozapam. What I get is a reduction in other related symptoms and enough sedation to sleep off the pain.

          Thank you for sharing your experience. I learned much about fioricet and you have raised awareness on the complexity of treating migraines.

          Again, may you have access to effective therapies.

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