Draining the Life Out of You

Draining the Life Out of You

I am a fairly energetic person, or at least I was before the migraines became so consistent. Even through the episodic migraines I have lived with for years now, I always managed to find a way to power through and be productive on most days with exception to the really bad migraines. On the occasions that I get the extreme migraine, it definitely knocks me off of my feet until my medication can eventually get it under control again.

Medication losing effectiveness

Lately, I have discovered a downward spiraling trend with my migraine pain. My abortive, which used to work exceptionally well, has started to lose its effectiveness. I still count on my medication to break the cycle of most of my episodes, but on the rare occasion that I have a bad one, the medicine is beginning to falter. I have been able to count on my medication for quite some time to get the job done. Unfortunately, things are beginning to change. On some days, the medication works great while on other days, the medication barely even takes the edge off.

Exhaustion regardless of sleep

The result of the medicine beginning to not work as well leaves me to endure the pain for considerably longer, which can lead to a depression or just a generally unhappy mood. It has also begun to take its toll on me physically. I find that more and more, even after a good night’s sleep, that I have no energy in the mornings when I get up. The pain becomes a drain on my energy regardless of how much sleep I can get at night.

The alarm goes off, I sit up and turn the alarm off just like before, but lately, I spend the next fifteen to twenty minutes sitting there on the side of the bed with my face in my hands. I spend this time trying to grasp that the new day has arrived and it is time to get started once again. These are the days where I spend almost half of my day fighting falling asleep at work. Unfortunately, eating does not seem to help one way or another, beyond the fact that if I do not eat I am almost certain to end up with another migraine.

The doctor struggle

At this point I am not sure what to do about it. I am afraid to ask my doctor about trying a different abortive medication because on most days, the one I have really helps. But on the days that my current medication does not help, it almost seems to make things worse. I have also experienced that anytime I try explaining the feeling drained or exhausted from the migraine pain, the doctors simply want to prescribe antidepressants. It is like the doctors do not realize or understand that the pain from a severe migraine can drain you physically and emotionally without you having to be officially depressed daily.

Do your migraines drain you physically and emotionally?

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

View Comments (51)
  • Purvi
    1 month ago

    Yes at times the medications don’t seem to work and I have the added pressure from doctors to avoid the overdose of tryptans. But that’s the only thing that works. I have tried alternative medicine as well which does help with the frequency and intensity, but the demon is there every single day debilating my life.

  • Purvi
    1 month ago

    Yes at times the medications don’t seem to work and I have the added pressure from doctors to avoid the overdose of trusting. But that’s the only thing that works. I have tried alternative medicine as well which does help with the frequency and intensity, but the demon is there every single day debilating my life.

  • CobyMeg
    2 months ago

    It’s hopeless as far as I am concerned. I no longer talk to any medicos. Every possible treatment has failed (including Aimovig and cannabis). No pain medication works either. Like you I try to ignore it and I exercise like mad and compete in athletics (at 79) but really it is just damn hopeless.

  • deedeevee1
    2 months ago

    Yes they do. When I address this with my medical team I’m normally met with, change of diet or adding multi-vitamins. It’s never addressed as a symptom or by product of migraine disease. Very unfortunate.

  • harobed
    2 months ago

    Migraines for me are daily. This new medication called Aimovig, Ajovy are CGRP. Calcitonin gene related peptides are being givin out free to people with commercial insurance. But those of us on Medicare and limited budgets don’t qualify. My first injection cost me over $360.00 dollars. Insurance paid the other half. My doctor keeps trying to get coverage for me. They say I’m approved. Then nothing happens. Both companies have approved then turned me down. It gets confusing and frustrating.

  • Ld5townsend
    2 months ago

    I sympathize with that. My meds do and don’t work too.
    I have depression and migraines. They are often comorbid. You can take short term antidepressants and get off of them. My depression is chronic due to brain chemicals off balance, so I will have to take that permanently. Don’t fear talking to your doctor, and they are there to help.

  • Kate Koltun
    2 months ago

    I have the same experience Steve, and it is so frustrating. Doctors of any training, including migraine specialists do not seem to understand the full dynamic of migraine, at least not the ones I have seen in the past 5 years in California. My original neurologist got it, but I had to move because my migraines were so bad I was spending more time in hospital than at home and I still had one child at home to raise and I was trying to work. Anyways, I just wanted you to know that you are not alone, and I too, feel the frustration that my doctors cannot comprehend the level of exhaustion I feel from having intense migraines each day (with no appropriate abortive). I feel myself aging decades every year.

  • CelloGirl
    2 months ago

    Don’t be so quick to dismiss antidepressants. Some can actually help with migraines, as they raise the amount of serotonin in the brain, as low serotonin is thought to play a role in migraines.

    Antidepressants weren’t right for me for a long list of reasons, but, I am glad I tried them because my doctors and I now know that low serotonin is not what’s causing my migraines. This led my doctors and I to the conclusion that my migraines were due to inflammation, anxiety, and environmental triggers. Further testing also showed that I was deficient in iron, sodium, and potassium, so, I was told to increase my intake of those nutrients.

    Preventatively, I take Boswellia-Serrata extract (aka Indian Frankincense) for inflammation, and propranolol (beta blocker) to minimize the pain and pressure in my head, as well as help treat my anxiety. During a migraine, I drink Mountain Dew and Gatorade, as well as eating popsicles and taking cold showers. This works every time.

  • emwinn
    2 months ago

    Steve,
    I have been where you are. I won’t bore you with the details but please try Aimovig. Those shots have changed my life after 30 plus years of disabling migraines.

  • st24B-
    2 months ago

    To Steven Workman
    I understand where you are coming from. I have complex migraine disease every day. I have been to 2 neurologists…both of whom have declared there is nothing else out there for me. So, I’m on my own. Because of the last one, I had a TIA and spent 2 days in the hospital. The doctors said it was definitely not due to the migraine, but that I was having one of those episodes too. I was given antidepressants, which I cannot tolerate. I feel like I am going around in circles every day. Do You?

  • gabriel67
    2 months ago

    You have described my life also. I have dealt with severe migraines since 18. I’m now 68. After 50 years of this, I get frustrated by the categories the med professionals put me in. I’ve tried all the preventive meds like Topomax, Toporal, et.al. including Amitryptilene, and Botox.
    I currently take Relpax to stop one, but it not very effective anymore. Back to the neurologist.

  • sandyeeds
    2 months ago

    Steve, you have written my story. Those could be my words…..until I started taking Aimovig. I’m on the 140mg dose now (started at 70mg) and I am a new person. After 17 years of trying every off-label medication and alternative therapy on the market I was beyond frustrated and depressed – totally not like the “real Sandy”. I took early retirement from IBM because of the migraines. Aimovig has given me my life back. I have energy; the migraines that do happen are “mini migraines”; and there are far fewer of them. I’m so happy now I fear I am driving my friends crazy with my level of “Wow, I can participate in life again” feeling. Plus, when they get a text from me they no longer worry that I am again cancelling out of plans we’d made (always with an understanding I might have to cancel). Also, zero side effects from Aimovig. Truly. I hope you get an opportunity to try the amazing medication.

  • jd0144
    2 months ago

    Wow kudos to you your explination of what you go through is the same as me drs just want to medicat I been fighting the same fight but Iam Gona give this ajovi a try on the 18th of this month but at this point I just pray for a good day iam half the man I once was

  • jjmcwil
    2 months ago

    Oh for sure! Some days I am not even sure what is worse. Days like today I am just trying to get through the work day. But then I have a 4 year old to take care of. I hate not being “there” for him. I hate that he is 4 years old and so “used” to my migraines that he will pat my hand and say “it’s okay mom, it will get better”. Then when I retreat from my room he says with a hug and a big smile, “mom do you feel much better”? It’s heartbreaking.

  • ndw6888
    2 months ago

    Oh exhaustion, I feel you. Oh the utter life-suck! I’ve had daily chronic migraine for close to four years now. Top three things that get to me are the sensitivities to noise/touch, the mental fog, and the unbelievable exhaustion. I work full time. I’ve had to start being kinder to myself and accept that there are plenty of times I need to push through this unwelcome triad (let alone the pain), but there are equally as many times that I need to accept some limitations in my activity and seek rest. I’m finally getting to the point that I am not so angry and so overcome with the loss of a healthier, energy abundant life. That kindness and self-acceptance legitimately helps the actual intensity of the migraine. I still get whoppers that knock me off my butt more frenquently than I like, but anything that gives a boost to my quality of life is a grateful win. I hope you find a combo that makes life more bearable and enjoyable!

  • Cintrovert
    2 months ago

    I’ve been having migraine since I was twelve. So much more is known about it and the treatments are so much better than then. I, like you, have had to rethink my meds from time to time. I haven’t been afraid to talk to my doctor about how thing are working or not working in a long time. If your doctor is not treating your concerns about your migraine and is not willing to work with you and the various treatmentsfor migraine, then I would seriously be looking for a new doctor. I also have problems with the exhaustion that happens. I nor my doc have found a good solution for that yet.

  • shell
    3 months ago

    I deal with this too. Most of the time I can rely on my medicine but there are days it takes much longer to work or it doesn’t work at all. Some days I just can’t shake them.I wake up in the morning and I struggle to get ready for work waiting for the medicine to work. Then I am exhausted from the side effects of the medicine. Don’t want to change my preventative medicine cause it does work. The doctor is pushing antidepressants saying you have to control your stress. Yeh, right. Don’t want antidepressants . Maybe I need to try something new. I’m so tired I have to worry every minute of every day about getting a migraine and how to stay on schedule and stay away from things that cause one and you still end up with one breaking through. Ugghhh

  • mammapeaches (Susan McManus)
    3 months ago

    Steve,

    Great article!! I have been on the same “struggle bus” lately! My abortives have been doing the same thing, either working, or not touching my migraine at all. (I will say that I have a few different triptans that I use on a rotational basis. Different types and forms such as pills and nose spray). Lately, I have felt so much more fatigued and so much more “blue” and practically downright depressed. This has never happened before. I feel that the wet winter I’m experiencing is not helping either. Just trying to keep my chin up and get through each day and I don’t work anymore! Migraine stole that from me.

    Hang in there and ask your doctor if you can try a different abortive. Your body might be getting too used to the one you keep taking.

  • GGourgues
    3 months ago

    “Absolutely! Pain physically and mentally drains you.” My first doctor in college told me that. Though she was not specifically referring to migraine, it helps me understand why I feel physically and mentally drain dealing with migraine. Not only the pain does that but also all the planning, thinking, stategizing regarding migraine add to the drainage of energy. I read that unless the migraine specialist suffers from migraine him/herself they cannot understand the pain and struggle associated with migraine. I wholeheartedly agree.

  • Frosti
    4 months ago

    Many doctors do not understand migraines, even though it may be their specialty (Neurologist). I had one doctor tell me that I should just take some aspirin and stop complaining. He was filling in for my regular Neurologist at the time. This doctor would not refill my meds, would not tell me what to take with my current med as it was not breaking the cycle and I was on day 5 of a migraine. I hung up the phone exhausted and crying. I refused to talk with the doctor ever again via phone and refused his visit in the hospital where I ended up because of the migraine. My Neurologist understood as he too got migraines (although not as often). Really need a doctor that understands!

  • tucker
    6 months ago

    Wow, That exactly describes how I feel right now! I slept 11 hours last night and finally made myself get up. It’s 3pm and I’ve accomplished nothing. OK, I’m digging thru old emails and such. But you are so spot on. It doesn’t help that it’s been raining and dreary for days so my head has been aching too. Today is better even with the t-storms that are going on right now but I have a thermacare on my neck and shoulders for the stiffness and pain.

    I’m right there with you, I’ve gone thru lots of preventatives over the last 20 years. I’m at a point in my life where my migraines were slowing down a bit but when they come it’s for 2-5 days and I just get dysfunctional and exhausted. It’s not a matter of not sleeping, I sleep great unless the dogs wake me up to go out which is rare. I think it’s a matter of putting up a front and pretending you can still function normally. At home I still take out the trash or cook dinner- a mother job is never done…. sigh. The hardest part is being nice and functioning at work. That also take a huge toll on our mental and physical energy level

    I’ve used Botox for about 8 years and my new doctor (a headache specialist) wants to try Aimovig. In the meantime, my Botox has worn off so the migraines are getting worse with hurricanes and summer t-storms. So I cycle thru Maxalt, Imitrex shots, excedrin, advil, ice packs, thermacare, and sleep. I am trying to exercise more – walking the dogs and some yoga videos at home. Fresh air always helps but I’ll be glad when it cools down some.

    I hope you find something that works. It is an ongoing process. So much info and so many combos of preventive meds. Maybe you need to tinker with those? It’s worth a try. Best of luck!

  • theskyremains
    7 months ago

    “Migraine sleep,” as we call it in my house, has no effect on the fatigue for me. I can sleep all day with a migraine and wake up feeling just as fatigued as before. I suspect this is because it isn’t a body fatigue or the normal mental fatigue at the end of the day.

    Often when I’m in prodrome, the fatigue hits hard and I turn to coffee to try to stay alert at work. The more coffee I have, the more amped up my body gets (jittery, sweaty, increased heart rate, etc.), but it barely touches the fatigue. My body isn’t tired; the fatigue is literally all in my head.

    It’s frustrating for sure. I’m learning to accept that I just have to wait it out and not judge myself for needing to sleep or feeling exhausted for “no reason.” Instead of trying to fight an attack or power through with meds, I’ve been attempting to use only enough to cope (trying to avoid the MOH cycle) and instead focus on lifestyle factors, including the emotional aspect of migraine, to try to reduce the frequency and severity.

  • Nananina
    7 months ago

    I hear you Steven. The fatigue experienced during migraine attacks is almost as disabling as the headache phase.
    My migraines got worse about 2 years ago. Medication wasn’t working efficiently anymore. I would take Relpax (eletriptan) and the pain would come back after 6 hours and this would be a 3-4 day cycle.
    The neurologist told me that my body needed to detox after 30 years of taking migraine medication. I went through 3 months of no medication at all, not even a Tylenol. Pain medication is now working again. I started a preventive treatment with Amitriptyline which is an anti-depressant but also used to treat chronic pain. I have seen an improvement.
    In order to go through a detox period, you need to have the support from work. You’ll be missing work more often since you can’t treat the pain.
    It is tough, but for me worth it.
    Good luck my fellow migraneur, I hope you find a solution.

  • lightweaver
    7 months ago

    It becomes isolating and depressing so often.

  • l1rwdn
    7 months ago

    That’s the thing. I suffer from terrible aches and tiredness much more so than headache pain. But nobody understands that, so I just say I have a migraine headache. Mine last all day, and then the next day I am usually pretty fatigued despite a good night’s sleep. Fortunately I am retired now and no longer have to try to explain once again that I am suffering from a migraine and need to take another day off of work.

  • DizzyLizzy7
    7 months ago

    After having several months of vestibular migraines and before my migrainne episodes morphed into the more well known headaches I had about 6 months where my main symptom of a debilitating fatigue. My PCP could not find a reason for this. Finally someone who had adrenal fatigue suggested I may have that. A non traditional healer diagnosed adrenal fatigue and I got the help i needed. I am convinced that this period of fatigue was a different manifestation of the shape shifting migraine. have others had months of fatigue that they felt was due to migraine?

  • Wendy
    6 months ago

    I left my job in January because of severe fatigue that my doctor can’t find a medical reason for. I mostly tell people I left because of migraine as I do believe this fatigue issue was brought on somehow by my chronic migraine. I have no idea how but I feel that it has to be related as the migraines got really bad just before this fatigue kicked in hard. I do feel like my fatigue came on gradually though getting worse until I was no longer able to function on a daily basis. I felt like I was dying and there was nothing that my doctor could find or do to help me. It took months after I left my job to feel any better but now I can cook meals most nights unless migraine interferes.

  • mrst53
    8 months ago

    Steven, have you seen a pain doc? Sometimes they understand the pain better than other docs, Other than that you need to find a more compassionet Nuero doc. If they don’t specialize in migraines, then they may not understand the feeling of exhaustion that comes with migraines-pre, during and post. I feel for you.

  • Imjcn
    8 months ago

    Very well-written and true for me as well. Do you think the effectiveness of your abortive has been affected because it’s gone generic? I feel that is true for mine.
    I have also run into the problem of refilling my abortive prescription “too soon” so my insurance would not cover the cost. Why does the insurance company get to tell me how many pills they will give me for my migraines? They are okay with me suffering through the rest or going to the ER? I don’t like that at all.

  • Steven Workman moderator author
    8 months ago

    I really could not say with any certainty if medicines going generic had an effect one way or the other. I believe the meds I take we’re genetics before I started taking them. It is unfortunate that the insurance companies limit how many pills they will cover per month, but there seems to be a standard across the board with the insurance companies, because I’ve not heard of a company that does not apply limits like that. Thank you for sharing your experience.
    Steven Workman.

  • amp254
    8 months ago

    I am also have chronic severe migraines and have for many, many years. I use Zomig now as a rescue medication and have for over 15 years I think. When I first started I used half a 2.5 mg pill and that worked to stop my migraines years ago before they became as frequent and as bad as they are now. At some point had to start taking the whole 2.5 mg. pill to get rid of them. Just recently had to increase to 1 1/2 pills to stop my migraines. Don’t like increasing dose since it causes side effects (neck pain, muscle tightness and pain, constipation, etc.) but have tried many meds without success. Hope you can find what works for you!

  • Steven Workman moderator author
    8 months ago

    Amp254 thank you for sharing your experience. One thing I have noticed is that a lot of the time if my imitrex pill does not work, the imitrex shot will work. I do not know if that is due to dosage or the way the medicine is given. Another thing I fight with a lot is dehydration. I suppose I always stay right on the edge of being dehydrated. Many times that is what cause the migraines. Thanks again for sharing.
    Steven Workman

  • BayouTigress
    8 months ago

    Wow, this me! Being in constant pain just wears me out. Some Drs don’t get how physically exhausting it is to fight it day in and day out. Depression may or may not be part of it. I really don’t think anyone who is not in some kind of constant pain understands the physical toll on your body. I know I did not realize how bad it was until I started wearing a fitness tracker and monitoring my heart rate. My heart rate tracks my pain level. About once a quarter I hit a cycle where none of the standard protocols work. I have found a new Nureo who is more aggreessive once a treatment stops working and does acute interventions, like nerve blocks and infusion therapy, in his office instead of having to go to the ER or Urgent care. These are not something that can be done often but a few times a year to break a bad cycle. Something you might want to ask your Dr about. And if they cannot do it they may be able to arrange for another Dr who is trained to do it. I am on Neuro Dr #4 before I found one that is as agressive with treament as I would like.

  • Steven Workman moderator author
    8 months ago

    You are so right about others not understanding how drained you can feel. It is hard to even describe with enough detail to make them understand. It sounds like your current neurologist has some pretty solid determination and that’s awesome. Thank you for sharing your experience. Best wishes.
    Steven Workman

  • anonbutanon
    8 months ago

    No matter what changes I make in my life, migraine is something I contend with daily. That being said, I do have a firmer grip on it at the moment. But there seems to be a cyclical pattern I can’t break out of. I will go along pretty well – my abortive medication works and I’ve learned most of the triggers to avoid, even though they do change as I get older. But a few times a year – whether it be related to temperature, barometric pressure, allergies, light, what have you – I will go for a few weeks at a time with daily insurmountable head pain and all its cousins. This leads to fatigue which in turns triggers my depression. I’ve learned to head off the worst of the depression (it actually is depression in my case) by getting ridiculous amounts of rest balanced with exercise. I find that when I feel my fatigue building up regardless of rest, I will do something that would seem counter-intuitive like HITT on my stationary bike. Oddly, pushing myself on the bike seems to trigger something (beyond the ‘Oh boy. I’m dying now for sure’ feeling) and I can break free for a bit. I wish I understood it better. Endorphins probably play their part. But I can definitely relate to your struggle.

  • Steven Workman moderator author
    8 months ago

    I’m sorry that you have to go through that cycle, but it seems like you have a pretty solid counter measure for working through it. I’ve been looking into getting back in a local gym myself. I’ve been told by a number of people that exercise in general has made a huge impact on their migraines, both in frequency and intensity. Thank you for sharing your experiences.
    Steven Workman

  • Kate
    8 months ago

    Yes, I can so relate – chronic pain is draining! Also, so many of us have other health issues that can compound the effects (neck, gastro, bladder, skin, and lots of sleep issues for me). Depression is common, but I also think doctors are often too quick to jump to that if you are chronically ill and report feeling sleepy/tired/fatigued. I second the comment on getting a sleep study done, if you actually feel sleepy (not just tired or fatigued, which are actually 3 different things).

    They can diagnose more than just apnea, and apnea can occur even if you aren’t overweight and don’t snore. I have mild apnea, but also a limb movement disorder (kick in my sleep and cause micro arousals, disrupting sleep), insomnia, a need to sleep more hours/night than most (10+), and idiopathic hypersomnia (like narcolepsy, but diagnosed if a daytime nap test shows you fall asleep quickly, but not REM).

  • Steven Workman moderator author
    8 months ago

    You are so right. I’ve had a number of doctors try jumping straight to depression when I mention feeling fatigued due to lack of sleep. It’s so frustrating when depression seems to be the “go to” diagnosis. I’ve even tried a few different medications for it to appease the doctors so they could see for themselves that it didn’t help. Hopefully they will figure something out eventually. Thank you for sharing.
    Steven Workman

  • Looking for answers
    8 months ago

    Steven, have you had a sleep study done? As a respiratory therapist, the symptoms you are describing could be OSA (obstructive sleep apnea). Sometimes we get so focused on migraines (after all it controls my life on most days) that we forget our bodies could have other problems. It might be worth your time to take an overnight test. Lack of sleep is one of my biggest triggers for migraine. Best wishes!

  • Steven Workman moderator author
    8 months ago

    Actually yes I’ve had a sleep study. I also have sleep apnea and the little machine that goes with it. It definitely adds to the problem. But I also run into the problem of losing my breath while I’m wide awake as well. It happens at the most random times too like sitting at my desk at work or watching television. My hope is that losing some of the extra weight will at the very least help to improve my symptoms. Might just be wishful thinking, but that’s the hope. Thank you for sharing your thoughts on this.
    Steven Workman

  • boehmec
    3 months ago

    Steven, loosing the weight will help. I had to attack it twice…first was a breast reduction (probably not your issue, but…), and a month later, with some focused neck muscle work, they were reduced quite a bit. I’ve also had bariatric surgery, and the weight holds lots of inflammation, so I’ve been told. That helped, too. Good luck!

  • john0427
    8 months ago

    Doctors not only don’t realize the amount of pain they don’t care that’s the real problem

  • Steven Workman moderator author
    8 months ago

    I understand your frustrations as I’ve shared in them from time to time. But I can’t help but wonder is it truly is a lack of empathy, or if something else is holding them back from doing better. Maybe they simply don’t have the same level of understanding if they are perhaps new to the field, or maybe if they have been in this field for too long, perhaps they are simply stuck in older outdated remedies. Thanks for sharing your input. All the best.
    Steven Workman

  • Ladybugsy
    8 months ago

    Hello, are you by chance taking Milk Thistle? I began taking it years ago and found it changed the effectiveness of my migraine medicine to the point it stopped working. I talked to a pharmacist to see if he thought I was right and he said yes, only take milk thistle for 3 days, then stop for 2 weeks; repeat.

    I only eat organic food now and the days of my meds not working are much fewer. They take awhile to work at times, but eventually kick in and knock it down.

    The liver is key; if you can try to eat a liver friendly diet, it should help your meds work consistently,,, hopefully!

    I hope this helps! I can usually trace my meds not working back to something I’ve eaten that I shouldn’t have; or had too much; ,,, everything in moderation it seems, will help. Take care and good luck!

    One other thing; if you haven’t already; see if your doctor or a naturopath will order you a CRP blood test as well as do allergy testing for foods that cause an inflammatory response. Then cut those out of your diet and see if you feel better.

  • Steven Workman moderator author
    8 months ago

    Ladybugsy no I’ve not taken milk thistle. I have had blood work done to determine what allergies I do have and it was quite the eye opener. I’ve met several people that have all but completely gotten rid of migraines by changing their diet to organic and gluten free but it is not something I have tried personally. Thank you for sharing your input.
    Steven Workman

  • goldstein
    8 months ago

    Your article summarises well my feelings at several points in my life. As my “lines of defense” as I call them (first, triptans; then, NSAIDs; then, assorted medicines) fall, despair and desperation set in.

    I realize I go through phases, worse or not so much. What I try to do when a rough phase is settling in is to reduce the triggers, by abolishing alcohol, sleeping regularly, meditating, taking magnesium, fish oil and melatonin regularly, and using ice packs, homeopathic mecine and mint oil as soon as I have any signs of the migraine (that is, before pain sets in). All of this to try to reduce the general level of inflammation in the body and try to “ride out” the bad phase.

    When all else fails and pain and other symptoms are just too intense to endure, then emergency room or GP it is. I’ve had to undergo at least a couple of prophylactic treatments to be able to go back to a “base level” of low inflammation.

    Thanks for the article!

  • Steven Workman moderator author
    8 months ago

    Goldstein you brought up a good point about going through phases. I think most of us go through those phases of desperation, hopelessness and anxiety; but then also go through phases where things aren’t quite as bad. It is at times exhausting. You also mentioned homeopathic remedies which is something I’d personally like to research and try. Thank you so much for sharing your experience.
    Steven Workman

  • IntricatePurple
    8 months ago

    This spoke to me on volumes that could wake the dead, and exactly how i am feeling today. Thank you for sharing this because some days I think I am the only one or that I am crazy and need to be committed to an institution. I am starting to feel not so alone in my struggles.

  • Steven Workman moderator author
    8 months ago

    IntricatePurple you are definitely not alone. We are all in this together even though sometimes it may not feel that way. Sometimes we have to be our own support network to make it through the harder days. Thank you for sharing your own experiences. Hopefully you will find some relief and rest soon.
    Steven Workman. (Author, moderator)

  • JR
    2 months ago

    I have had Migraines/Cluster Headaches since 1991 A present from the 1st Gulf War. I have tried Botox & every other Med you could Prescribe to, I’m on my 3rd Month of Aimovig & they have Doubled up the amount to see if it helps?? I have had Occipital Nerve Blocks with no relief, I’m hoping the Double Dose Of Aimovig Helps!!! After that I don’t knew whats Next?? The Meds I’m taking give me a little relief, but when Your Body is so drained From the Migraines I do my Best to Get along!!! I don’t go anywhere without Shades & a Retired Marine Cap To block the Lights that Make it more Extreme!! One thing I learned is to stay away from the ER because just think I’m looking for DRUGS!!!All in all I work my way though it! Semper Fidelis!!!

  • Joanna Bodner moderator
    2 months ago

    Hi there @jrmartin, First…I’d like to thank you greatly for your service to our country and to say that we are grateful that you are part of our community to share your unique experiences with us. Additionally, I see that you mentioned you experience Cluster Headaches and I wanted to share that we have a specific forum page dedicated to that topic should you like to join in on any of the conversations there. – https://migraine.com/forum/cluster-headache/. Be gentle on yourself and as you said…keeping doing YOUR best! Know we are always here for support. -Joanna (Migraine.com Team)

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