I Tried a Ginger Tincture for My Migraine

Last updated: November 2023

It was all over social media. Fellow migraineurs who claimed a ginger tincture was equally as effective as their prescription migraine medicine. They certainly had my attention.

I definitely embrace medicine, but if there’s a natural option that gets the same result, of course I’ll reach for that first. So, the next migraine I decided to give it a try. What did I have to lose?

How can ginger help with migraine?

After all, ginger has a long history of medicinal use. It been used in cultures around the world for its anti-inflammatory properties. Many people reach for it to address nausea and digestive issues, but some suggest that it could also reduce the intensity and duration of headaches. I heard this firsthand when I was in culinary school and an Ayurvedic chef recommended ginger tea for my migraine.

Has ginger worked for me in the past?

I actually found some relief with ginger tea so I was optimistic that the concentration of the ginger tincture would be even more effective. The only problem was, I had ordered it yet! I searched Amazon for a same day delivery, but the cost was double what I would pay at my local health store. I mustered up the energy to go to the store and took the ginger as soon as I got back in my car in the parking lot. I needed relief from the pain.

Did the ginger tincture work for me?

My first lesson with ginger tinctures was obvious – follow the directions to mix it with water. I took it straight and it was not pleasant. Yet, I still felt like maybe the concentration of it would make it even more effective.

I started driving home with hopeful anticipation of how soon I would feel relief. An hour later… I was still waiting, but with the awareness that this might not be the remedy for me. If ginger tinctures were effective for others, they certainly weren’t for me.

I was so disappointed. If even just cut the edge of the migraine. It didn’t do anything. Honestly, my body felt a little weird after taking it.

What did my cranial sacral therapist say?

A couple days later the migraine still didn’t break so I went to my cranial sacral therapist who often helps with bodywork. She pointed out that I had a lot of muscular tension in my body that could have been the root of the migraine. She went on to say, that if that’s the case, the ginger might not be effective when the migraines are muscular in nature.

Will I try it again?

That was an interesting perspective, that I shouldn’t be so quick to rule out the ginger just because it didn’t work for this one migraine. As we migraineurs know, there are countless triggers to migraine attacks – food, stress, muscular tension, environment, weather… the list goes on. So perhaps when we explore remedies, they may be dependent upon the nature of the migraine.

Honestly, I don’t know that I’ll try the ginger again, but I will remain open to remedies like this because you never know when one could just help cut the edge of the pain and bring you some much needed comfort.

I’m curious to know, have you tried the ginger tincture remedy? What was your experience? I would love to hear if you found relief from it.

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