Any tips for managing weather related triggers?


Community Answers
  • Chen
    1 year ago

    Has anyone tried “MigraineX® clinically proven to prevent Travel and Weather related migraine symptoms before they start”

  • LAnnSmith
    1 year ago

    Those nasal sprays for allergies (like Nasonex) which contain small doses of steroids help me during storm seasons. Found this by accident. For me if I start using a low dose a week or two before the expected stormy season and then every day or two during the season. It doesn’t take very much to work.

    Right now it’s fire season here and it’s actually helping me with this also. I’m very happy because the smoky air is usually a major trigger for me.

  • 20mari3ll3n16
    1 year ago

    I live in Fla So I call Hurricane season MIGRAINE SEASON b/c that’s when I get my Migraines. I don’t know what 2 do besides move & I don’t want 2 do that. My DR told me that as I got older it would get better but I am 70 now & am not looking forward 2 getting older. My mom is 93 & swears she’s NEVER had a Migraine, but my sister gets the ones wi ora in her sleep. NOT ME! I get full blown MIGRAINES! RATS!

  • Sunny
    1 year ago

    When the barometric pressure falls, the air pressure inside our sinuses can expand. This can create a feeling of fullness inside your head, and in some people with a tendency towards migraines, that sets off a cascade – fullness leads to pressure, which leads to expanded blood vessels, which leads to pain, which leads to more pressure, etc.

    Air pressure changes also happen when you are in an airplane, so if you are inclined towards weather-related migraines, air travel could be a trigger as well.

    The key is to treat the feeling of fullness the way you would any other indication of a migraine coming, so that you take an abortive early, before the migraine can develop. If you’re already at your weekly limit for triptan, an antihistamine combined with an NSAID may help relieve the pressure.

  • Tamara
    1 year ago

    What about you are pass you limit for NSAIDs too? I react to every little tiny change in weather … any front coming through, thunderstorms, getting sunny again after a storm (pressure raising I think?). I try to keep an eye on the weather and take meds early but months like June I hit 15 days on the 21st …. and the first migraine I tried to ride out sent me to the ER in very severe pain so I ended up with pain meds anyway. It’s a no win situation. All yes I am seeing a migraine specialist, tried many many preventatives (4 different ones right now) and watch my other triggers – sleep, dehydration, meal skipping etc. But I also have extremely bad stress right since my boss just fired up because of my slipping work performance from the migraines.

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    1 year ago

    Weather trigger migraines can be particularly tricky as there is no way to avoid changes in the barometric pressure or fluctuating temperatures. What we can do is be extra vigilant about avoiding our other triggers. And the thing is weather changes themselves may not trigger a migraine attack, but if we aren’t keeping a regular sleep schedule, become dehydrated, and/or eat something with MSG in it AND a weather front moves in, a migraine attack may occur. In addition to avoiding our known migraine triggers, staying indoors before or during inclement weather as well as tracking weather changes may also be helpful. Some doctors suggest taking acetazolamide brand name Diamox, if we are certain changes in the weather trigger our migraines. You can read more about this here; https://migraine.com/living-migraine/triggered-by-weather-this-medication-may-help/.

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