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Migraine is More Than Head Pain: The Many Symptoms of Migraine

Those who have never had a migraine tend to think of it as a raging headache. While sympathetic folks may understand that the pain is awful, even they don’t realize that a migraine is not only a headache. While it is certainly a major aspect, pain is one of many symptoms of migraine. The pain is a big deal, but it is only a small part of this neurological disorder that impacts the entire body. Migraine: The Complete Guide, a book published by the American Headache Society in 1994, has the most comprehensive list I’ve found. Though the book is old and no longer available this list is invaluable.

Visual Aura (before the pain begins)

  • a bright shape that spreads across the visual field of one eye and appears to block some or all of the vision; can be seen whether the eye is open or closed
  • flashes of light and color
  • wavy lines
  • geometric patterns
  • blurred vision
  • partial loss of sight

Sensory

Motor

  • partial paralysis
  • weakness or heaviness in the limbs on one side of the body

Cognitive


Digestive

Fluid disturbances

  • increased thirst
  • frequent urination
  • bloating/fluid retention

Mental/Personality

  • fatigue, lethargy
  • mood changes
  • irritability
  • high energy
  • depression
  • anxiety
  • nervousness
  • euphoria, feeling of intense well-being

Digestive

  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • intolerance of food odors
  • loss of appetite
  • diarrhea
  • constipation

Skin

  • paleness
  • cold, clammy hands and feet
  • facial swelling
  • goose bumps
  • bloodshot eyes
  • black circles around eyes
  • sweating

Respiratory

Circulatory

  • changes in blood chemistry
  • changes in blood pressure
  • blood vessel dilation
  • difficulty regulating temperature
  • changes in heart rhythms

Though quite detailed, this list is by no means complete. I can add dizziness and trembling. What about you? Which of these symptoms do you have? Do you have other symptoms not listed here?

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The Migraine.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

  • Shadow1234
    1 week ago

    Hi Curtie Carol, thank you for posting. I too am having more migraine problems as I get older. At 55 and beginning menopause, I can’t tell what’s what anymore. This weekend, I’m having hot episodes ( I don’t call them flashes because they last hours) with anxiety, headache, dizziness and trouble thinking straight. It can be downright scary.

  • CurtieCarol
    2 weeks ago

    I was recently hospitalized as psychotic. I had delusions, hallucinations, paranoia, and super-acute (painful) hearing. I had mild headaches throughout this time. I am now wondering how much migraine contributed to all these symptoms, given that I have no history of mental illness.

  • Whisper292
    2 weeks ago

    My ongoing symptoms include hallucinating odors, increased thirst, frequent urination, dizziness, sighing, earaches, neck pain, and nightmares.

    I’m curious to know of anyone has the unusual symptoms when pain doesn’t occur. I have these symptoms -all the time-, even when I don’t seem to be having a migraine.

  • Mylifematters
    4 months ago

    Vertigo, earache, jaw aches

  • Medicmom18
    4 months ago

    I’ve never heard anyone mention this, but at the beginning of a migraine and through the course of it I will have an auditory hallucination that takes the form of a line or a few bars of a piece of music, or a word that repeats in my head over and over. I’m curious if anyone else has ever experienced this

  • egret56181
    3 weeks ago

    Yes! I get a very sing-songy repetition of music, sometimes sung and sometimes instrumental. It’s very unnerving and I have to work to push it away.

  • maryanne59
    4 months ago

    Has anyone ever had marked gait disturbance and poor balance and coordination with their migraine?

  • Whisper292
    2 weeks ago

    Yes! I forgot to put that in my own list, but that’s very common for me, too.

  • RobinfromCA
    3 months ago

    Yes, coordination! I am super klutzy when a migraine is coming or going.

  • Steviegee
    4 months ago

    Yes, it has only started in the last 5 months after years of headaches. Not sure why it’s changed.

  • CurtieCarol
    2 weeks ago

    I am 74 years old, and my migraines have increased as I get older. I have now experienced almost every kind of migraine symptom, with or without headache. Some of that appears to be associated with decreased hormone production.

  • CurtieCarol
    2 weeks ago

    Yes, and poor balance and coordination.

  • Meemaless
    7 months ago

    Barometric pressure changes bring on headaches. In addition to the listed symptoms I also have ringing in my ears, earaches and ear drainage.

  • Kayeff
    11 months ago

    Doesthis book go into detail about how migraine causes these symptoms? I would love to know. Some of my symptoms aren’t acknowledged widely as migraine symptoms but here they are actually mentioned!!

  • Kerrie Smyres moderator author
    11 months ago

    Great question, Kayeff. The book doesn’t, likely because the science of migraine was so sparse at the time that they didn’t know. Do you mind sharing which symptoms? I can check if there’s more current research that looks at those symptoms. I’m not sure if I’ll be able to sleuth it out, but I’d like to try.

    Take care,
    Kerrie

  • willowbunny
    12 months ago

    Thought it my be of interest to list the lovely effects a migraine is causing me.

    Visual Aura (before the pain begins)
    blurred vision
    partial loss of sight

    Sensory

    numbness or tingling on the face or upper extremities
    heightened sensitivity to light, sound, and smells
    smelling odors that aren’t actually present (like natural gas or something burning)
    skin sensitivity and intolerance of being touched (allodynia)

    Motor

    partial paralysis
    weakness or heaviness in the limbs on one side of the body

    Cognitive

    inability to concentrate

    Digestive

    food cravings (particularly for carbohydrates, candy and chocolate)
    stomach rumblings
    constipation

    Fluid disturbances

    increased thirst
    frequent urination
    bloating/fluid retention

    Mental/Personality

    fatigue, lethargy
    mood changes
    irritability
    depression
    anxiety
    nervousness

    Digestive

    nausea
    intolerance of food odors
    loss of appetite
    diarrhea

    Skin

    paleness
    cold, clammy hands and feet
    facial swelling
    goose bumps
    bloodshot eyes
    black circles around eyes
    sweating

    Respiratory

    frequent yawning
    nasal congestion
    runny nose

    Circulatory

    changes in blood pressure
    difficulty regulating temperature
    changes in heart rhythms

  • tanya1969
    2 years ago

    My migraine were debilitating, until I was tested and treated for Lyme disease.. I still occasionally get them, but they are not as severe.

  • jackiers
    2 years ago

    Lately I have the feeling similar to having an eye lash in my eye. I know I don’t, but it leads to a migraine. That is one of many symptoms.
    I’m 56 and I started having migraines more frequently about 10 years ago with my monthly cycle. My cycle has stopped, but the headaches seem to be around the same time, so I’m guessing they are hormonal.
    Another thing that sets me off is turkey. I have been mostly pescatarian for over 40 years, but about 15 years ago I started eating turkey and regret it.
    I have had digestive problems for about 20 years. I know I have a very large appendix (diverticulosis and an ischemic bowel) and I have been having a lot of symptoms that someone with appendicitis would have…..can this just be from the migraines….I have been having migraines for weeks. They usually don’t last this long. Could the appendices cause migraines???

  • grammayumyum
    2 years ago

    My basilar migraines also come with spells of lethargy and unconsciousness.

  • nikkig127
    2 years ago

    I have aura, sensory, cognitive and motor symptoms and most recently, I had a 4 week dizzy spell. I saw an ENT who did all kinds of tests for vertigo and ear pressure, etc…while I do have some vestibular disturbanceS, they said it wasn’t enough to cause the amount of dizziness I was feeling. So I also switched my birth control, something my neurologist and gynecologist have been trying to get me to do for a couple of years, that didn’t change the dizziness. Final verdict, it was a month long type of migraine with no pain or other symptoms – just extreme dizziness and nausea.

    I also have migraines with aura that don’t have pain associated. I just see a bright, glowing/twinkling > shape in my right eye. I can’t see around the > or past it, so I have to look with my other eye because the light in my right eye obstructs my view. There’s no pain involved at first, but the constant eye strain eventually causes a headache.

    Then there’s the other no pain kind, where the right side of my body goes numb, I can’t hear out of my right ear, can’t see out of my right eye at all and head-to-toe, I can’t feel anhtbing on the right side. No pain though. Of course they thought it was a stroke the first time this happened. I was rushed to the ER, put through all the tests, not a stroke. Then a series of other tests for several months after. Just a migraine.

    All of those..then, I have the normal kind with pain. I’ve had painful migraines since I was a kid. The others have been popping up randomly over the past 10-15 years. Who knew there were so many different kinds of migraines??

  • cindyd
    2 years ago

    I work in a prison and one day I was walking through the prison and my coworkers were saying hello to me and I recognized their faces but could not remember their names.

  • fourposies
    2 years ago

    My ears feel as though I’m under water and my nose bone gets really pressured as though I have heavy glasses sitting on it. Weird!

  • kenfree
    2 years ago

    Kerrie,
    Thanks for this useful list. I do think that, yes, dizziness, in particular VERTIGO, should be included among the symptoms.
    Ken

  • DinaMay
    2 years ago

    I was diagnosed with migraines after a long trek through various medical offices including a psychiatric (who said, no, it’s not all in my head). I’d had “monster” headaches since at least 7th grade and I’d learned there was no use taking aspirin or Tylenol or Motrin or….I was diagnosed after several long-lasting severe migraines for which I was hospitalized. My symptoms made the doctors think I was having a stroke. But each time I got better spontaneously. Luckily, I was able to see a migraine specialist who developed a treatment plan and eventually I got better.
    As for symptoms, I would add difficulty speaking as well as understanding and sometimes even aphasia (inability to,speak at all). And like a previous commenter, on my affected side my hand takes on the “claw” pose and refuses to listen to my commands. Another comment referred to abdominal migraines, which afflict one of my sisters (who also went through that medical trek). From what she describes, it’s a lot like what I have but in reverse. For me the torture is mostly in my head and neck with other symptoms in my abdomen and limbs while my sister’s are mostly in her abdomen with others randomly attacking elsewhere. She has to be more careful about what she eats than I do and doesn’t take any of the triptans. One of the oddest symptoms that she and I share is the opposite of euphoria (feeling super good) — it’s a vague creeping sense of doom, feeling that there is something terribly horribly wrong, like the world is coming to an end. Then when the pain starts, we can relax. No, the world is not about to end, it’s another migraine.
    Finally, thank you all for being there.

  • egret56181
    3 weeks ago

    Holy cow! I had that happen.this morning for the first time: the total sense of doom and I thought I was having an anxiety attack and sat down to do breathing exercises. Then, about 10 minutes later the pain started. It’s like our nervous system figured it out before we do.

  • aks868
    2 years ago

    Oh my gosh–do I have so many of those symptoms–one of the weird ones is thinking I smell cigarette smoke. The visual disturbances are extremely annoying, but the worst is the word retrieval and mental fogginess and mood symptoms. The pain is awful, but somewhat easier to deal with because it feels “real” while the other symptoms are so amorphous and sometimes hard to catch–I mean everyone has good and bad days, so sometimes I don’t know when I am having a migraine and when I am just not having a good day. Sometimes I also feel like my cheeks are numb. Finally, my face looks totally different when I am getting a a migraine or when I have one–I get the puffy eyes, and dark rings, and one of my eyes loses some color. Thank you for the list–it is validating to not think one is imagining everything!

  • Karen Rudd
    2 years ago

    I would add extreme overstimulation of my skin…my clothes hurt, it hurts to brush my hair and anything rubbing on any part of me almost burns.

  • Scarby
    2 years ago

    Every single one on the cognitive list, plus thinking I hear someone talking, very faintly. As far as visual, the biggest for me is flashes of light, especially when my eyes are closed. The more “violent” the explosion of light then worse the pain will be. Even my rescue meds won’t help much. I found it rather amusing that irritability was listed twice. I have never experienced the high energy with my migraines. Certainly wish that I would as I might could accomplish something while at home with a migraine, like today. (Storms moving through the area, one of my biggest triggers). Thank you for sharing this list! I share such things with my husband and he also appreciates it. So happy I found this community!

  • pam bitterman
    2 years ago

    Sore achy muscles, particularly around the neck and shoulders! Could be a response to tightening up against the pain….

  • Poe15
    2 years ago

    Of all the migraine symptoms from which I suffer, I find the headache the easiest to deal with. It’s the other symptoms that have made migraines so challenging for me – especially the brain fog and language issues (I’m an English teacher!). There’s nothing quite like losing one’s ability to speak intelligibly or understand what others are saying in front of a classroom! Luckily, my students tend to be very understanding (more understanding than most of my colleagues). Depression, anxiety, and irritability have also made life difficult, though I think I might finally have found an anti-depressant that works to mitigate both the migraine and my mood changes. Strangely enough, though, the increased sensitivity to light and sound has changed my life the most. And I would be curious to know if others have experienced the following? I had migraines when I was younger (teens and early twenties), which went away at some point, but returned with peri-menopause (or a particularly stressful period in my life – hard to know the cause). Initially, while I was having a migraine (or getting one), I would experience increased sensitivity to external stimuli. But after a few years of this, I am now pretty much always sensitive to light, sounds, odors, etc. I no longer socialize because I can’t stand the buzz of voices; cities can be very difficult; I can’t be out in the sun without big hat and sunglasses (and even then it’s a challenge). I rarely play music at home. Does migraine permanently alter one’s brain chemistry?

  • Madskillz
    3 years ago

    God is good i been dealing with a chronic migraine that has not gone away 4 a sec since 10/2/2011 it may b less painful but not gone & these dr keep acting like i been makin this up all this time. I did have headaches alot when i was younger but im the kind of person that trys to push thru the pain and as a mom of 2 boys (they’ll be 22 & 14 this yr) i couldnt just lay in bed cuz that was my oldest son senior yr i had to get him ready 4 college and everything (we all know as parents there is no such thing as sick days) So now i am on my 7th neurologist now smh prayin they finally find wats causing this cuz i have like 98% of all these symptoms and its crazy cuz they told me it wasnt genetics but my mom had them, my youngest son been getting them since he was 5 but i just thought it was regular headaches. But this dr is a headache specialist so he had info at his office that told me it is genetic and all those problems i didnt make up in my head…so im not crazy

  • Meredith
    3 years ago

    I’ve recently discovered the articles and comments section of this website and rejoice. It’s great to find so many different look ups; that others have a crazy variety of symptoms that are part of Migraines. After just a couple of hours over a few days, I realize there are many like me.

    It took 62 years for me to get diagnosed! ( a young DO, 1st in her class, listened well, only 2 visits and she put together what numerous MD’s a few DO’s in 2 states never figured out.And I have about 95% of classic symptoms, along with some unusual ones! Among my apparently unusal combination of symptoms are: from weather related/barometric pressure trigger (drops are worse) by neck twists; when x-rayed it looks like I was hung. Cervical vertabra 1 goes right, C-2 goes left. Called Hangman’s injury on some websites. Excruciatingly painful.Referral pain, and subluxations travel down spine. This leads to ear pain in left ear, if chiropractic adjustments not received within 24-26 hrs. Ear infection develops, also sinus infections. Left unadjusted I then get sore throat, turns into strep throat. Bronchitis follows. Pneumonia comes neck. All from a migraine.

    edited comment with additional material added

  • Joanna Bodner moderator
    3 years ago

    Hi Meredith!

    Yay!!!! I am so happy to read you discovered how to connect further with members in our Migraine.com community! If you are active on Facebook, please feel free to visit our page where the conversation is always very active. Additionally, you can visit our forums section – https://migraine.com/forums/.

    It’s wonderful to read that finally after SO MANY years that it took a fresh, young & attentive DO to get to the bottom & provide you with a proper diagnosis. You certainly are contenting with many complicated symptoms.

    Thanks for taking the time to comment & we hope to read more more from you in the future. Please always feel free to reach out!

    Take care,
    Joanna (Migraine.com Team)

  • Meredith
    3 years ago

    I’ve recently discovered the articles and comments section of this website and rejoice. It’s great to find so many different look ups; that others have a crazy variety of symptoms that are part of Migraines. After just a couple of hours over a few days, I realize there are many like me.

    It took 62 years for me to get diagnosed! ( a young DO, 1st in her class, listened well, only 2 visits and she put together what numerous MD’s a few DO’s in 2 states never figured out.And I have about 95% of classic symptoms, along with some unusual ones!

  • Yohanna
    3 years ago

    I am new to this site. I do not know how to ask about migraine and stomach cramps. Anybody here know or have guidance to learn about “abdominal migraines” ? Have some of the other symptoms mentioned . Headaches are currently helped with Excedrin most times. Nothing helps with abdominal pain . Several years, multiple Drs . Hoping for guidance through this site

  • kenfree
    2 years ago

    Hi Yohanna,
    You have my sympathy. Abdominal migraines were my “introductory course” to migraine…I experienced them as a young adolescent, and can still recall them vividly…usually occurred around bedtime, a feeling of overwhelming stress without a known cause. I’d like to say I outgrew them, but truth is, I just “progressed” to other types of migraine which, believe it or not, were far worse (vertiginous migraine). I was reminded of my adolescent migraines recently when I contracted the shingles in the abdominal area…the pain was more acute, though, and while “nerve” pain, was not quite the same variety as the migraine. Hope you find some good info and will share if you do…

  • Rebecca Cheshire
    3 years ago

    I have severe basilar migraine and get partial paralysis down the right hand side of my face and my right arm. My right hand usually goes into what I call ‘the claw’ and I can’t move it. I get pins and needles. I stammer and stutter really badly and if I don’t get to bed quickly I can black out. I don’t really know what happens and my consultant refuses to believe I black out, he says I probably go to sleep but if standing i fall to the floor like I’m fainting or passing out. I am lucky I haven’t hurt myself doing this, other than cuts and bruises i get from the falls. This symptom is the one I struggle with the most as it causes great anxiety and stress. To such a point I have had to give up work. Does anyone else suffer these symptoms and can you offer any advice?

  • kenfree
    2 years ago

    Hi Rebecca,
    Sounds like you and I have a match of sorts. In the past four years I have had two “TIA’s,” as the professionals choose to call them, where I lose complete motor control, but do not quite pass out. Both instances occurred first thing in the morning. In the more recent episode, I had profound aura during the entire episode, but definitely did not lose consciousness, though I was unable to control my thinking. When I began recovering after a few minutes of collapsing, my left arm was numb, and I had no control over my left hand. The pins and needles there were severe. My neurologist thinks that my hypotension triggers the migraine, but I’m not convinced.

  • Joanne
    3 years ago

    Besides nausea and feeling like my head is going to explode, I also get very sensitive to sound (this is also a trigger for me but when I have a migraine, I can’t tolerate any noise at all), sensitive to strong smells. I also, can’t stop yawning (I thought this was just something strange my body does until I read it on this website), I start sweating and my face gets flushed, can’t deal with thinking or listening to anyone or anything. My sinuses get plugged up and my nose runs. If the migraine gets stronger, I have to go to the bathroom.

    I agree with the fact more attention need to be brought to how serious a migraine can be. I was recently in the hospital for something unrelated and the staff didn’t realize that all my triggers happen at once (no sleep, off schedule with my meds, not eating). It wasn’t until I had a migraines two nights in a row , that they realize that it was possible.

  • kimP
    4 years ago

    This list is enlightening for me. I never knew why I had a swollen eye or cold feet and hands. Ive had migraines since I was six but not diagnosed till my 30’s when my pcp finally figured out that my sinus infections were actually migraines. I personally have had no luck with neurologists but my pcp has me on triptan pill and sumatriptan injections. Ive tried all the preventatives with no luck. I get most of the listed symptoms unfortunately. As for other symptoms I have…I get bad kanker sores in my mouth right before onset. Its hard for me to decide what symptom is my fibro, nerve damage from cancer or migraine. This disease is just so debilitating and misunderstood.

  • roseburg
    4 years ago

    I’m a newbie. My experiences with migraines were always a headache that arriv d a day or two before my periods. At perimenopause I began having dizzy spells and severe neck tension and bouts of brain fog. These spells would often be precursor by a weird fuzziness in my vision and an odd kind of “confused” sensation…like my brain wasn’t working correctly. Yeah. My neurologist told me it’s very common during menopause to have migraines that don’t always produce the headache, but present like mine. Now I’m fully menopausal, and I’ve been having spells of full migraine head pain, and the postdrone of weariness, fogginess and wiped out feeling.
    Today I’m slowly recovering from a headache which peaked (I hope) yesterday. What I’ve experienced this time is feeling crummy and foggy and still head achey, plus muscle and joint achiness. Is that a common postdrome symptom? Thanks–

  • Meaghan Coneys moderator
    3 years ago

    Hi Andrea,

    Thank you for your post. We are glad you found our community here at Migraine.com! I realize you posted this a couple days ago, so I do hope you have moved through your migraine attack and are feeling better. Regarding postdrome symptoms, I feel you may find this article helpful – https://migraine.com/migraine-basics/migraine-phases/. It specifically identifies the symptoms you experience during the postdrome phase (phase 4), relating it to experiencing a “hangover”. You can also click on the specific symptoms and it will bring you to a new page that further discusses those symptoms. If you have any additional questions please do not hesitate to reach out. We love hearing from you. Wishing you all the best.

    Warmly,

    Meaghan (Migraine.com Team)

  • Stormy
    5 years ago

    Although I’m new to this amazing site, unfortunately I’m not new to migraines. I’m 46 now & have been having migraines since my late teens. In my teens I would know a migraine was upon me by having flaming red, hot to the touch cheeks & ears. However, with a couple OTC pills, the symptoms would go away. I didn’t necessarily have horrid head pain, but loss of focus, concentration & a sensation of a pressure in my head. I have this impression, I’d have to say, that the migraines were a really bright white light. I have an extremely high pain tolerance (gave birth to my 1st child in 1hr 7mins with no pain meds whatsoever!) Now my migraines are much more to the point! I still get flaming red cheeks, plus incredible migraine pain, weakness, nausea, vomiting, extreme sensitivity to light, sound, smells, spots & squiggly lines before my eyes, irritability, soaking sweats, exhaustion, but unfortunately so far I am unable to take preventative meds because I’m allergic, immediate relief meds don’t work & I’m unable to take the OTC meds because of the intense reactions to the cafiene. The shaking, jitteriness, jumpiness, etc are almost as unbearable as the migraines! So, all I’m left with is, as far as I know of, is a cloth bag filled with frozen corn on my head, darkness, soundless, cool room. My husband is gracious enough to sneak on tip toes into our room & check & switch out the corn bag for a new colder one & I require many hours of sleep. Oddly enough, I’ve noticed over the years that from a day to just hours before a NASTY migraine, I feel fantastic, tons of energy, get lots of things accomplished….then WHAM!! I’m down for the count. After browsing this site, I noted quite a few comments regarding foods to avoid, anyone have any good links so I can check the foods list to see if I can do any better with my diet? Thanks all. Much love, peace & relief to you all!

  • Jeannette
    2 years ago
  • dandy7
    7 years ago

    My experience has involved most of these symptoms. concentration being my biggest problem. one not mentioned is upsidedown vision. sometimes when the pain is just to demanding my vision has inverted and I see everything upsidedown for a few moments. By watching what I eat I am controlling the pain but it never leaves, one doctor said it’s all in my head-and I couldn’t agree more. No medication has ever helped.

  • janiceclemens
    7 years ago

    I have experienced at least 75% of the list of symptoms above.

    I have been to 2 neuro’s and I have finally just gone back to my PCP.
    Tired of being told it’s just a headache and to get over it. When people ask how I am, my answer is now, fine thank you, because no one thinks it is more than a head ache. I have goven up on the medical profession for a cure or even for help and am trying to use as many holistic and herbal remedies as I can to see if I can help myself since no one wants to believe it more than “just a headache” even thought this week I had to leave work early on tuesday and miss wednesday due to a severe migraine with the auram tunnel vision, and vomiting.

  • Ter-i
    3 years ago

    What somewhat helps is vomiting on people who tell you it it “just a headache” 🙂

  • ocprgmr
    7 years ago

    I have had almost 30 of the above symptoms. Thank you, so much, for posting this list!

    This is the first time that I’ve see the facial swelling mentioned as one of the symptoms. That has been one of my symptoms that confused the heck out of all of my doctors (other than my current neurologist who said it “might” be connected).

    If I’m lucky, only the tissue around my eyes swell. If I’m not,then my entire face and neck area swells up and it looks like I’ve put on about 50 lbs; I end up with a double or triple chin, and no defined jawline.

    The migraines certainly mess with my diabetes management — especially the food cravings.

  • elizabethglenn
    7 years ago

    I must have over 20 of the symptoms. I am always nauseated when my attack first starts. I also have hemi facial spasms. The right side of my face will draw. It usually starts with my eye. It will totally close. My family can tell when I’m in pain. Now, it also goes down my face to my mouth. It looks like Bell’s Palsey, which was the 1st diagnosis many years ago! Prayers go out to all on here! It is so miserable to have this disease!

  • Benice
    7 years ago

    I also get teary eyes with the yawning that is when I know it is time to take my medicine. A lot of these symptoms aren’t mentioned by doctors. I hate the fact that I have to get up and urinate during a migraine attack, that has to be the worse because you have to move. Thanks for listing them all, I sometimes forget how it effects every system in the body.

  • Aaron
    7 years ago

    Getting up has to be the worst part for me as well. I get so weak and dizzy that I end up crawling to the bathroom, and I hate to admit as a guy sitting down to urinate because I can’t stand is very weird LOL.

  • Cary Woodruff
    7 years ago

    I always thought the yawning was strange, but I yawn lots before any other noticeable symptoms. It’s my watch out.

  • Amy Morris
    7 years ago

    Terry and Keenan’s migraines are completely different. And Terry has 4 or 5 different migraines (jaw, shoulder, temple…etc.). Such a weird thing! I’ll ask them about the yawning thing. (Now I need to yawn…)

  • Cindy Frankenfield
    7 years ago

    As a doctor explained it during a seminar I attended many years ago, “Migraine is an incurable, disease Incurable, yes, but it can be CONTROLLED, if we watch what we eat, drink and how we exercise.” He’s correct, our behavior as with everything else we do, depends on us, too. I’ve had them since I was 4 years old and we’ve come a l-o-n-g way! With all the symptoms some of you describe, I would ask to be tested for fibromyalgia, too. Some of those symptoms seem like “crossover” symptoms to me, just a thought.

  • cindyd
    2 years ago

    I don’t think mine are controlled. I think that I attempt to manage them. If they were controllable, we wouldn’t all be on her with such atrange symptoms. I truly don’t think people that do not have them can ever completely understand what we go through.

  • Cindy Frankenfield
    7 years ago

    You posted this in Jan.2012. Where are you able to find Midrin? Walgreens says it’s no longer on the market. My doc’s office has called pharmacy’s only to be told the same thing. Right now, to get rid of one ****doc DID NOT RECOMMEND THIS*** I drink a Dr. Pepper & take 2 Aleve about 2 hours later it lets up. Takes a lot longer, but better than the alternative! I’m on 100mg of Topamax twice daily for prevention, so I don’t have many break-thru headaches.

  • Aaron
    7 years ago

    I like the Dr. Pepper part! I need a doctor that recommends me to drink it, that would be a doctor even my stubborn side would listen to.

  • Terri Williams-Yeadon
    7 years ago

    I have at least one from evrything that was listed and it is real hard to live when a migraine comes on the only thing I don’t get is the araua.

  • Aaron
    7 years ago

    For the longest time I wasn’t sure I got an actual aura either, and from what I have found a lot of people actually don’t get one, I thought that me getting overwhelmed by light was my only warning sign or the throbbing ice pick above my eye for a quick onset. But with my job I have been wearing sunglasses, because of the florescent lighting and staring at a computer screen for 8 hours a day, I have been able to notice that I get blurry vision before the light sensitivity and the sensation I was on a boat. Basically like Kerrie I have been able to discover more aspects of my symptoms because I didn’t have to focus just one one.

  • Angie Childs
    7 years ago

    My daughter has had some of theses symptoms and some other ones. The worst thing was this week is that they doctors were trying to say that she was making this up just to get out of school and stay home. I have a 13 year old daughter suffering from a bad Migranin this week who would rather be at school than home. After reading this I now know that the symptoms are all caused from the Miraine and not a possible illness also.

  • Jill Edwards McDowell
    7 years ago

    I have at least twenty of these symptoms. Many of them I have on a daily basis. Now that I’ve found this site, and this list, maybe I can better explain what I’m going through to my family and friends 🙂 May your day be migraine free!

  • Ann-Annie Parks Heck
    7 years ago

    I have ocular migraines–it may feel like something is squeezing my ocular nerves like crazy or other times it feels like a red hot poker is stabbing the backs of my eyes. My headaches are usually on both sides but sometimes just in 1 eye. Per my husband, my speech totally changes when I have a migraine–the pitch is lower and I speak more slowly. Thank you for the article–it’s wonderful!

  • Ann-Annie Parks Heck
    7 years ago

    no, Barb, they started in my early 30’s…thank heavens that at least I didn’t have them then, huh 🙂

  • Barb Giardina
    7 years ago

    did you have migraines as a child?

  • Danita Villarreal Heersche
    7 years ago

    I have a lot of those, some I didn’t even realize are from the migraine. I have had this one for almost 18 months and it has had “bad” and “worse” days. meaning some days are more tolerable. Like my friend Rosette posted, “don’t judge me till you walk a mile in my shoes or live a day in my life.” Like I said some days I feel like I can do what ever I want…. After all I can’t stop living so when my pain level is down from a 10 plus, to a 7 I try to do as many things as I can just to feel some what normal.

  • Barb Kalinski
    7 years ago

    Migraine is not just a headache- it is a brain attack. If you are “lucky” as I was to have the visual aura that is a precursor, you MAY be able to take some medication to ward it off. Otherwise just get ready to crawl off and disappear for a day or so.

  • Barb Kalinski
    7 years ago

    Cindy Frankenfield I found out, purely by accident, that mine were hormone related. When my doctor took me OFF hormone replacements due to breast abnormalities, suddenly my migraines stopped. I suffered for YEARS with them!

  • Cindy Frankenfield
    7 years ago

    AAactually, migraine is a DISEASE with no cure at this time according to my doctor.

  • Sue Ivany
    7 years ago

    excellent Kerrie. Thanks.

  • Stacy Phillips
    7 years ago

    I too have ringing ears, and even after the pain is gone, my ears will ring for at least a couple of days. And almost always 3 days of “hangover” feeling.

  • Dawn Barry Martin
    7 years ago

    I have experienced too many of these symptoms and am guilty of wishing a migraine on people just so they would understand what I’m going through.

  • Carolin Redin
    7 years ago

    Thank you. I can add forgetting words and finding it hard to string a sentence together.

  • Ellen Schnakenberg
    7 years ago

    Hi Kerrie, it’s good to meet another who uses indomethacin. There aren’t a lot of us out there who can tolerate it I suppose. I’m not sure what I would do without it. Doesn’t fix anything, but does keep me sane and fairly functional most of the time.

  • Karen Ludt Farley
    7 years ago

    Sure wish this book was still available. What a great article! Thanks so much.

  • Jaime Clark
    7 years ago

    Sarah, I get that feeling to that I’m larger than the things around me. It usually happens when I go to bed, then I suddenly feel like that, or I close my eyes and everything starts spinning. I also can feel pressure in my head where the pain will be before it starts. Always in the back of my head. I hate it.

  • Aaron
    7 years ago

    Jaime, do you also get like a ringing or a tone in your ears?

  • Carol D. Marsh
    7 years ago

    I have a symptom related to some of the above, but that I’ve never heard mentioned specifically: a bad taste in my mouth. Also, the pain above one eye radiates down through my jaw and gives me an earache. Like others below, cannot type well. Thanks for the list – I don’t want to live life as a victim, but sometimes you just want to be understood.

  • Cindy Frankenfield
    7 years ago

    Melanie Symonds I crave chocolate which is a trigger.. go figure!

  • Connie Wood Fulks
    7 years ago

    Growing up, my Mom said she could tell that I was going to get a migraine because of onset of bad breath; years of migraine caused me to realize that it was because my saliva production almost quit when I had a migraine.

  • Melanie Symonds
    7 years ago

    Yes, it finally dawned on me one day that the reason I “crave” sweet or salty foods when a migraine is coming on is to get rid of the bad taste in my mouth!

  • Michelle Devine Hallman
    7 years ago

    The part that really gets me is the drained feeling once they are over.

  • That M Word: A Migraine Blog
    7 years ago

    Thank you for this article! A migraine is NOT just a headache! (In lieu of an aura, my head also becomes very tender on the side where a migraine is coming.)

  • Mary Regina
    7 years ago

    I have everyone in respiratory and motor.

  • Debbie DiMarcantonio
    7 years ago

    Thanks for posting, this list has been very helpful as I have experienced many of these symptoms.A migraine truly isn’t just a headache.

  • Heather Macon Lawless
    7 years ago

    I agree with Sarah. I too have the curved sight and ringing in my ears, feel of freezing, inability to type what I am thinking, added to the list above. This is a very detailed list. However, not complete.

  • Heather Macon Lawless
    7 years ago

    If you have a loved one family or friend, read this so that you might understand. It is a full body experience. We aren’t withdrawn. We need our friends, but don’t want or feel like asking for companionship during this time. Just knowing someone is close is comforting.

  • Rosette Alcantara Doyle
    7 years ago

    Don’t judge me till you walk a mile in my shoes or live a day in my life…If there was only a way people could understand what it is like to have Hemiplegic Migraines. This is a wonderful list. Thank you for posting!

  • Bridget Marie Gilpin-James
    7 years ago

    My pain is so intense it feels like pieces of my brain. are exploding. When it is finally over, my brain feels bruised, every muscle aches, and the fatigue is overwhelming. During the migraine I have to rock, and touch count my fingers (1234, 4321) much like an autistic child, to block out and combat.the sensory overload my body is experiencing.

  • Sarah Hackley
    7 years ago

    I also get ringing in my ears, and feel dizzy. Sometimes the walls and things around me appear curved, and every once in a while I feel larger than the things around me – sometimes even houses! If I didn’t know I had migraines, I might very well think I was going crazy. 😉

  • Aaron
    7 years ago

    Hi Sarah, I have been experiencing some of those same symptoms, have you looked into Migraine Associated Vertigo?

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