Getting Worse with Age? New Symptoms?

I’ve been having my migraines for over 30 years now. In my teenage years I had it twice a month, with a really bad headache. Gradually other symptoms came, sensitivity to light, smell, tingling all over my body, numb hands and feet, dizziness, nausea, vertigo, weakness, body aches, after migraine attacks fatigue, really bad. I started having panic attacks. Lost my first job due to migraines. Year after year it is getting worse. I practically have my migraines every day now. Most of them with a big headache and stiff neck. Unfortunately nothing helps. Excedrin migraine used to help ( I was talking about 8-10 pills a day). Sumatriptan is the only pill that helps ( for the most part of the day). Dark room, cold room, ice packs, massages, caffeine, does not respond. I tried almost everything.

I thought I knew and recognized all the symptoms. For past few weeks I am experiencing another weird feeling. Never had it before. My neurologist thinks it is another migraine symptom. Never had it before. So I feel very tired and weak for few minutes, sometimes with nausea. And after few minutes I feel wonderful. Fresh, energetic, I feel like dancing. And after another few minutes I am very tired and dizzy again. Several minutes go by, I feel great again. And so on and on and on throughout the day or days. It’s all new to me and I wonder if anyone has experienced something like this? Thanks!

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Comments

View Comments (19)
  • Soteria
    4 months ago

    I can so relate to these stories. Had my first migraine at about age 5 and had them twice a month or so (always right before my period). Wasn’t until I went through menopause that they kicked in big time. some lasting days at a time, vomiting, inability to walk, drive or make coherent sentences, massive brain fog, trips to he ER. I had been told by someone that hormone-related migraines tend to go away when a woman hits menopause – how wrong that was. They came every day. And I have also found that mine did ‘morph’ over time, never had the incredible nausea, or the tingling before, the stiff neck, dizziness, the crushing fatigue – all are now part of my migraine life. The occasional phantom smells that signify one is one the way (they say a migraineur can smell a lemon being sliced at 3 blocks…) So, yes, this is not unusual and you’re not alone. They hope I hang on to is that I was in a CGRP trial and it did work for me. So now I’m looking forward to the day when this med is approved by my insurance and I can find some relief again.

  • CaliAriesGirl author
    4 months ago

    Sense of smell, yes and sense of the sound. I can hear ice cubes rattling in the glass two rooms over and it bothers me to the extreme.

  • jmedlin
    4 months ago

    I get the elation , it passes quickly. Not the weakness but sudden abrupt fatigue,like have to stop right now dead tired. Like many have stated my symptoms have evolved over the years ,but I wonder if being younger you don’t connect until the cycles are chronic and overlapping each other. Another thing I did notice is during my pregnancies and breastfeeding years my migraines were much less.

  • migrainemom333
    4 months ago

    I have the exact same symptoms and have been to more than one Neurologist as well as more than one ENT. They seem baffled by the weird symptoms. I have been told I have migraine associated vertigo, vestibular migraine, chronic migraine, etc. I too have had the tingling, nausea dizziness, ear pain, balance issues, tiredness you name it. I am post menopausal and nothing has gotten better for me. I too have had headaches since I was young. However things have gotten worse. I don’t feel alone now having read other posts.

  • CaliAriesGirl author
    4 months ago

    Yes. Ear pain. Teeth pain. And balance issues. Sometimes I can’t take it anymore.
    My doctor says it’s going to get better after menopause. I don’t believe so.

  • SkiingIsBelieving
    4 months ago

    Hey, I too have had migraines for decades and they have morphed and worsened until recently, when I began a new approach. The elation and euphoria you mentioned, coming and going quickly, is a very common prodrome. Prodromes can feel like doom signals, but the good thing is, they can also be a sign to you that you are entering migraine territory and you can try to abort the process. I highly suggest you look into electrolyte equilibrium. I have begun a protocol that stresses hydration, potassium, magnesium and sodium in balance, and it has made a huge difference. If you are open to changing your diet, I recommend searching for Angela Stanton’s migraine protocol. I have learned that when I feel prodrome coming on, there are many things I can do. I have aborted many migraines without any meds. It’s so empowering! Good luck.

  • CaliAriesGirl author
    4 months ago

    Thank you! I’ll look into it.

  • fboho8
    4 months ago

    I’ve had migraine for over 30 years. In the past year, the usual head and neck pain, fatigue, upset stomach, etc, is now accompanied by body pain, mostly in my lower back and thighs, but can also involve shoulders and arms. It is an intense, deep achiness and stiffness, along with skin sensitivity. It disappears inbetween migraine attacks so I know it is related.
    So now I now longer call it a “headache”…my migraine is a whole body event.

  • marycr8on
    4 months ago

    Like you, I’ve had migraines for over 30 years with changing symptoms, the whole time. It’s difficult to keep up with them, they change so often. I don’t have anything that works consistently, either. I’ve never had the symptoms you described. But who knows, that could happen, too! I have been getting some nausea, lately and that didn’t happen until the past 6 months or so. I have been getting some awful, ice pick headaches that only last seconds but are really painful while they last. That’s new for me too. Thankfully, those don’t happen often but they have been happening more frequently.

    It’s too bad you couldn’t save all the energetic moments and use them when you wanted to. But migraines aren’t nice or considerate… Maybe you’ll start having more of the good moments than the bad and they will eventually go away. I’ll keep my fingers crossed for you!

  • CaliAriesGirl author
    4 months ago

    Thank you! Like everyone else on here, I am hoping that one day everything will be long gone….I know it happened to few people. Out of nowhere.

  • apascoe2
    4 months ago

    Yes! I have had some similar experiences that you describe, but I have also started having inner ear pain. After months of doctor’s visits, including an ENT, thyroid testing and a (thankfully benign) cancer scare I found out that the pain was actually a migraine! I’m also having some of my worse migraines stemming from allergy triggers. I use my 3-month supply of prescription meds in 2 week to one month time frames. I’m looking forward to visiting with my neurologist at my next appointment in 2 months to make sure the overuse of my meds isn’t actually working against me. It’s very frustrating. Hang in there–you’re not alone. I find this website to be very reassuring and helpful!

  • CaliAriesGirl author
    4 months ago

    Thank you for your nice words.
    Please, be careful with your meds.
    I know its easier to say than actually do it. My insurance covers only 9 pills of my triptan, (every 40 days!) and guess what…the prescription only lasts 9 days…

  • IntricatePurple
    5 months ago

    Preaching to the converted. My symptoms have also changed significantly within the past years. I’ve shared with my neurologist and she thinks because I am approaching my menopausal years that things are changing for me. Havent found a comfortable medium but she seems to think that my migraines will disappear after menopause. Hope can only hope right? Good Luck on your journey and i hope you find a resolve.

  • DangerMouse
    5 months ago

    I’m been having migraines since my early 20’s (43 now) and mine have changed a lot over the years. Everything from what sets them off, to frequency, intensity and even how well I can manage them. Very odd.

    It’s interesting you mention the tingling. I’ve started to experience that sensation over the past few months. Sometimes in my legs. Sometimes in my torso. It’s never been in conjunction with a migraine so I didn’t consider it might be related.

  • Joanna Bodner moderator
    5 months ago

    Hey there! Thanks for taking the time to share your experience. I noticed you mentioned a new symptom of tingling. While it may very well be associated with migraine, I just wanted to mention that anytime there is a new or worsening symptom it is always a good idea to discuss & share with your doctor. Nice hearing from you! -Joanna (Migraine.com Team)

  • petmigraine
    5 months ago

    Your story is interesting…I know my migraines have evolved and changed and just when I think I’ve got things figured out, they change again 🙁 Isn’t it frustrating to have new symptoms ?!
    I have not heard of your description before; feeling weak and then energetic that quickly. I do know that many times I will feel surprised at how energetic I feel one day and tell my husband, “I’m feeling really great today !” and always, always; the next day a migraine arrives (almost like I jinxed it !). So I do think there are definite waves of energy/fatigue highs and lows connected to migraines.
    And it’s challenging when you find that certain ‘treatment’ that worked well the last few times (ex: med dosage, massage, heat or combination of all) doesn’t work for the next attack 🙁
    Best wishes~
    Cheri

  • Nancy Harris Bonk moderator
    6 months ago

    Hi CaliAriesGirl,

    Thank you for sharing your journey with us. It’s not uncommon for our migraine patterns and symptoms to change over time. When this happens it’s always a good idea to check in with the doctor, which it sounds like you have.

    Migraine attacks can have a whole range of different symptoms including the ones you’ve mentioned. It may be a good idea to keep a detailed migraine diary for a few months to track your symptoms. Doing so can also help identify patterns and triggers. This link has information on keeping a diary; https://migraine.com/blog/keeping-migraine-diary-basics/.

    I hope this helps!
    Nancy

  • tucker
    4 months ago

    Thanks for the link for reminder and link about a migraine diary. I kept a very detailed one for years at the request of my PCP when I was first going down the road of really treating my migraines/chronic headaches. I still jot down that I have a migraine but no details. My neuro doesn’t ask for details so I got out of the habit. However, if I had a trend or knew some issues or triggers, I could probably help myself or guide them for better treatment.

    My journey too has evolved. Fortunately it seems to be tapering down at this time (I say after coming off a 5 day migraine during the rainy, hurricane weekend). That’s not to say the symptoms I get now aren’t just as bad in different ways. I think maybe our bodies also react to the medications we take and the “imbalances” from different disease states as we age and throw us for a loop in all different kinds of ways. So it would make sense that symptoms would change. (you know, biology + physics + science+humans + migraines = one hot mess!!)

  • AZReynolds
    4 months ago

    I have had migraines for over 50 years and they have gone from one or two a year to daily. The severity goes up and down, but my worst pain was in my 30-40s. Now I am in my 60s, I have developed sycope migraines. They really suck! I too have moments of euphoria, but I just assumed it was because I didn’t hurt! However, I do not swing back and forth quickly. But something my neurologist told me recently was that my Alice in Wonderland symptoms most likely are tied to my migraines. Those episodes are not new. I’ve had them since I was 11. Migraines started at 10 after a head injury. Anyway, I assume our migraines will always change. Maybe some day it will be for the better (?).

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